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Stord/Haugesund University College

HavanaCommunicationManagementSoins Infirmiers

Stord/Haugesund University College (HSH), Norwegian: Høgskolen Stord/Haugesund) is a medium sized state university college in Norway, with around 2700 students and 260 employees. The university college offers bachelor and master degrees in various fields (including information and communication technology, safety management, health sciences, and marine studies) and courses for professionals. The university college also has several PhD students working in various disciplines. The institution does not have the power to award doctoral degrees which must be awarded by an external institution.

The university college was established in 1994 when the Norwegian college system was restructured and Haugesund Sjukepleierhøgskole (Haugesund Nursing College), Stord Lærarhøgskule (Stord Teachers College) and Stord Sjukepleiarhøgskule (Stord Nursing College) merged. As a result, there are now campuses both in Haugesund and on Stord. The largest campus is located in Haugesund however as the administration is based in Stord, the Stord campus appears first in the name of the institution.

While HSH was formed fairly recently, the history of the founding institutions dates back to 1839 when teachers were educated on Stord. HSH in Haugesund dates back to 1985, when maritime education was offered. The development of HSH continues. Since 2008, HSH has been a partner in UH-nett Vest (Universitets- og høgskolenettet på Vestlandet). This organisation attempts to foster greater cooperation between the participating institutions.

As well as teaching, HSH also has a significant research output. In 2008, HSH recorded 53 publication points, a 49% increase on 2007.

National Art Schools (Cuba)

La HabanaArtDanceMusiqueEcologie, Evolution, Environnement

Cuba's National Art Schools (Escuelas Nacionales de Arte, now known as the Instituto Superior de Arte) are considered by historians to be one of the most outstanding architectural achievements of the Cuban Revolution. These innovative, organic Catalan-vaulted brick and terra-cotta structures were built on the site of a former country club in the far western Havana suburb of Cubanacán, which used to be Havana's "Beverly Hills" and was then mainly reserved for Communist Party officials. The schools were conceived and founded by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in 1961, and they reflect the utopian optimism and revolutionary exuberance of the early years of the Cuban Revolution. Over their years of active use, the schools served as the primary incubator for Cuba’s artists, musicians, actors and dancers.

By 1965, however, the art schools and their architects fell out of favor as Soviet-inspired functionalist forms became standard in Cuba. Additionally, the schools were subjected to accusations that their design was incompatible with the Cuban Revolution. These factors resulted in the schools’ near-complete decommissioning and the departure of two of their three architects. Never fully completed, the complex of buildings lay in various stages of use and abandonment, some parts literally overgrown by the jungle until preservation efforts began in the first decade of the 21st century. The schools’ legacy was eventually brought to light by regional and international architectural journals in the 1980s, piquing the curiosity of observers both internationally and within Cuba through the 1990s. This growing interest reached its apex in 1999 with the publication of the book Revolution of Forms - Cuba's Forgotten Art Schools, by John Loomis, a California-based architect, professor, and author. Following the publication of Revolution of Forms, the schools attracted even greater international attention and in 2000 they were nominated for the World Monuments Fund Watch List. In November 2010, the National Art Schools were officially recognized as national monuments by the Cuban Government, and they are currently being considered for inclusion on the World Heritage list of sites which have "outstanding universal value" to the world.

Cuba’s National Art Schools have inspired a series of art installations under the name of Utopia Posible by the Cuban artist Felipe Dulzaides, the documentary film Unfinished Spaces by Alysa Nahmias and Ben Murray, and an opera directed by Robert Wilson entitled Revolution of Forms (named after John Loomis' book) written by Charles Koppleman.
Logo ELAM (Latin American School of Medicine) Cuba

ELAM (Latin American School of Medicine) Cuba

La HabanaMédecine, Général, Interne

Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina (ELAM), formerly Escuela Latinoamericana de Ciencias Médicas (in Spanish; in English: Latin American School of Medicine (LASM), formerly Latin American School of Medical Sciences), is a major international medical school in Cuba and a prominent part of the Cuban healthcare system.

Established in 1999 and operated by the Cuban government, ELAM has been described as possibly being the largest medical school in the world by enrollment with approximately 19,550 students from 110 countries reported as enrolled in 2013. All those enrolled are international students from outside Cuba and mainly come from Latin America and the Caribbean as well as Africa and Asia. The school accepts students from the United States — 91 were reportedly enrolled as of January 2007. Tuition, accommodation and board are free, and a small stipend is provided for students.

An ELAM sister school operated by the Venezuela government and sited in Guri, Bolívar, Venezuela was scheduled to open in October 2006. However, it was only half built as of November 2008. The school is named Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina A.P. Réverénd after French physician Alejandro Próspero Réverénd.
Logo ELAM (Latin American School of Medicine) Cuba

ELAM (Latin American School of Medicine) Cuba

La HabanaMédecine, Général, Interne

Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina (ELAM), formerly Escuela Latinoamericana de Ciencias Médicas (in Spanish; in English: Latin American School of Medicine (LASM), formerly Latin American School of Medical Sciences), is a major international medical school in Cuba and a prominent part of the Cuban healthcare system.

Established in 1999 and operated by the Cuban government, ELAM has been described as possibly being the largest medical school in the world by enrollment with approximately 19,550 students from 110 countries reported as enrolled in 2013. All those enrolled are international students from outside Cuba and mainly come from Latin America and the Caribbean as well as Africa and Asia. The school accepts students from the United States — 91 were reportedly enrolled as of January 2007. Tuition, accommodation and board are free, and a small stipend is provided for students.

An ELAM sister school operated by the Venezuela government and sited in Guri, Bolívar, Venezuela was scheduled to open in October 2006. However, it was only half built as of November 2008. The school is named Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina A.P. Réverénd after French physician Alejandro Próspero Réverénd.
Logo German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases

German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases

HolguínNeurosciences, Neurologie

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