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Logo University of London

University of London

London

The University of London (informally referred to as London University) is a collegiate research university located in London, England, consisting of 18 constituent colleges, 10 research institutes and a number of central bodies.

The university is the second largest university by number of full-time students in the United Kingdom, with around 135,000 campus-based students and over 50,000 distance learning students in the University of London International Programmes. The university was established by Royal Charter in 1836, as a degree-awarding examination board for students holding certificates from London University (UCL) and King's College, London and "other such other Institutions, corporate or unincorporated, as shall be established for the purpose of Education, whether within the Metropolis or elsewhere within our United Kingdom". The university moved to a federal structure in 1900.

For most practical purposes, ranging from admissions to funding, the constituent colleges operate on a semi-independent basis, with some recently obtaining the power to award their own degrees whilst remaining in the federal university. The nine largest colleges of the university are King's College London; University College London; Birkbeck; Goldsmiths; the London Business School; Queen Mary; Royal Holloway; SOAS; and the London School of Economics and Political Science. The specialist colleges of the university include Heythrop College, specialising in philosophy and theology, and St George's, specialising in medicine. Imperial College London was formerly a member before it left the University of London in 2007. On the 16th July 2015 it was announced that City University London would join the federal University of London, becoming one of its constituent colleges from August 2016.

Many notable individuals have passed through the university, either as staff or students, including at least 4 monarchs, 52 presidents or prime ministers, 74 Nobel laureates, 6 Grammy winners, 2 Oscar winners and 3 Olympic gold medalists.

In post-nominals, the University of London is commonly abbreviated as Lond. or, more rarely, Londin., from the Latin Universitas Londiniensis after their degree abbreviations.
Logo Open University

Open University

Kents HillComputer Science, RoboticsHuman Resources, Social WorkSociologyEarth ScienceEcology, Evolution, EnvironmentHistory

The Open University (OU) is a public distance learning and research university, and one of the biggest universities in the UK for undergraduate education. The majority of the OU's undergraduate students are based throughout the United Kingdom and principally study off-campus; many of its courses (both undergraduate and postgraduate) can also be studied anywhere in the world. There is also a number of full-time postgraduate research students based on the 48-hectare university campus where they use the OU facilities for research, as well as more than 1000 members of academic and research staff and over 2500 administrative, operational and support staff. The OU was established in 1969 and the first students enrolled in January 1971. The University administration is based at Walton Hall, Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire, but has regional centres in each of its thirteen regions around the United Kingdom. It also has offices and regional examination centres in many other European countries. The university awards undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, as well as non-degree qualifications such as diplomas and certificates or continuing education units.

With more than 250,000 students enrolled, including around 32,000 aged under 25 and more than 50,000 overseas students, it is the largest academic institution in the United Kingdom (and one of the largest in Europe) by student number, and qualifies as one of the world's largest universities. Since it was founded, more than 1.5 million students have studied its courses. It was rated top university in England and Wales for student satisfaction in the 2005, 2006 and 2012 United Kingdom government national student satisfaction survey, and second in the 2007 survey. Out of 132 universities and colleges, the OU was ranked 43rd (second quartile) in the Times Higher Education Table of Excellence in 2008, between the University of Reading and University of the Arts London; it was rated highly in Design, Art History, English, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Computer Science, Development Studies, Social Policy and Social Work and Sociology. It was ranked overall as a nationally top forty, and globally top five hundred university by the Academic Ranking of World Universities in 2011, as well as being ranked 247 for citations of its academics.

The Open University is also one of only three United Kingdom higher education institutions to gain accreditation in the United States of America by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, an institutional accrediting agency, recognized by the United States Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.
Logo Belfast Metropolitan College

Belfast Metropolitan College

BelfastBusiness

Belfast Metropolitan College is a further and higher education institution in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The college offers both vocational education and academic qualifications. With over 50,000 enrolments and an annual budget in the region of £45 million, it is Northern Ireland's largest college.

It was created in 2007 by the merger of the Belfast Institute of Further and Higher Education (BIFHE) (formerly the Belfast Technical College, Rupert Stanley and The College of Business Studies) and Castlereagh College.

The college encompasses a number of different campuses around the city. The largest are the Millfield Campus, Castlereagh campus and Titanic Quarter building which opened in September 2011 and resulted in the closure of the Brunswick Street and the College Square East campuses. Although some support staff remained based in College Square they were moved out by winter 2013 with the building being sold. College Square East was formally known colloquially as the 'Black Man Tech'. This is because of the statue of Dr Henry Cooke, a leading 19th century Presbyterian, which stands outside the building. The statue of Cooke is not marble, but copper, like most other architecture around the city of Belfast around the same time. Due to exposure to the elements, most of these statues and domes around the city have oxidised, producing a green colour of copper oxide, especially noticeable on the nearby City Hall.

Millfield specialises in sports and social sciences. This campus offers courses from GCSE level to GNVQ and undergraduate courses. Castlereagh campus ( formerly Castlereagh college) specialises in Art and Design, Media and Business. The college also has campuses in Brunswick Street, Whiterock and Tower Street.

Past students include newsreader John Irvine, footballer Danny Blanchflower, actor Colin Morgan and TV personality Eamonn Holmes, Joseph Tomelty Northern Irish character actor and playwright, and television presenter and actor Aidan Browne.
Logo University of Manchester

University of Manchester

Manchester

The University of Manchester (UoM) is a public research university in the city of Manchester, England, formed in 2004 by the merger of the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (est. 1824) and the Victoria University of Manchester (est. 1851). Manchester is a member of the worldwide Universities Research Association, the Russell Group of British research universities and the N8 Group. The University of Manchester is regarded as a red brick university, and was a product of the civic university movement of the late 19th century. It formed a constituent part of the federal Victoria University between 1880, when it received its royal charter, and 1903–1904, when it was dissolved.

The main campus is south of Manchester city centre on Oxford Road. In 2012, the university had around 39,000 students and 10,400 staff, making it the largest single-site university in the United Kingdom. The University of Manchester had an income of £827 million in 2012–13, of which £200 million was from research grants and contracts.

The University of Manchester is ranked 30th in the world by QS World University Rankings. In an employability ranking published by Emerging, where CEOs and chairmans were asked to select the top universities which they recruited from, Manchester placed 25th in the world. In the 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities, Manchester is ranked 38th in the world and 5th in the UK. It is ranked 52nd in the world and 12th in Europe in the 2014 Times Higher Education World University Rankings. The university owns and operates major cultural assets such as the Manchester Museum, Whitworth Art Gallery, John Rylands Library and Jodrell Bank Observatory which includes the Grade I listed Lovell Telescope. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, Manchester came third in terms of research power and eighth for grade point average quality when including specialist institutions. More students try to gain entry to the University of Manchester than to any other university in the country, with more than 55,000 applications for undergraduate courses in 2014 resulting in 6.5 applicants for every place available. According to the 2012 Highfliers Report, Manchester is the most targeted university by the Top 100 Graduate Employers.

The University of Manchester has 25 Nobel laureates among its past and present students and staff, the fourth-highest number of any single university in the United Kingdom. Four Nobel laureates are currently among its staff – more than any other British university.
Logo Manchester Metropolitan University

Manchester Metropolitan University

ManchesterMechanical Engineering

Manchester Metropolitan University, often referred to as 'MMU' and simply referred to as 'Man Met', is a British public university located in North West England, and was established in 1970 as 'Manchester Polytechnic', and gained University Status in 1992. Its headquarters and central campus are in the city of Manchester, and there are additional facilities in the county of Cheshire. The university has its roots in the Manchester Mechanics' Institution (1824) and the Manchester School of Design (1838). It is the fifth largest university in the United Kingdom in terms of student numbers.

Teaching quality inspections place the university within the top twenty in the UK, according to The Complete University Guide. Teaching standards have also been described as 'among the highest in the country' by the Quality Assurance Agency. The university receives approximately 52,000 applications every year, making it the second most popular university in the UK by volume of applicants. The university is ranked fourth of the new universities in attracting research funds from the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

The university is an accredited member of the Association of MBAs, a member of the University Alliance, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the North West Universities Association and the European University Association. The university is home to the Manchester School of Art, the Manchester School of Theatre and, in conjunction with the University of Manchester, the Manchester School of Architecture.
Logo University College London

University College London

LondonTheology, ReligionNeurosciences, NeurologyPharmacology, Pharmacy

University College London (UCL) is a public research university in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Recognised as one of the most prestigious multidisciplinary research universities in the world, UCL is the largest higher education institution in London and the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment.

Founded in 1826 as London University, UCL was the first university institution established in London and the earliest in England to be entirely secular, to admit students regardless of their religion, and to admit women on equal terms with men. The philosopher Jeremy Bentham is commonly regarded as the spiritual father of UCL, as his radical ideas on education and society were the inspiration to its founders, although his direct involvement in its foundation was limited. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with the Institute of Neurology (in 1997), the Eastman Dental Institute (in 1999), the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (in 1999), the School of Pharmacy (in 2012) and the Institute of Education (in 2014).

UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals elsewhere in central London, and satellite campuses in Adelaide, Australia and Doha, Qatar. UCL is organised into 11 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL is responsible for several museums and collections in a wide range of fields, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology and the Grant Museum of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. UCL has around 36,000 students and 11,000 staff (including around 6,000 academic staff and 980 professors) and had a total income of £1.02 billion in 2013/14, of which £374.5 million was from research grants and contracts. UCL is a member of numerous academic organisations and is part of UCL Partners, the world's largest academic health science centre, and the 'golden triangle' of British universities.

UCL is one of the most selective British universities and ranks highly in national and international league tables. UCL's graduates are ranked among the most employable by international employers and its alumni include the "Father of the Nation" of each of India, Kenya and Mauritius, founders of Ghana, modern Japan and Nigeria, the inventor of the telephone, and one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA. UCL faculties have contributed to major advances in several disciplines; all five of the naturally-occurring noble gases were discovered at UCL by William Ramsay, the vacuum tube was invented by UCL graduate John Ambrose Fleming while a faculty of UCL and several foundational advances in modern statistics were made at UCL's statistical science department founded by Karl Pearson. There are 32 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists amongst UCL's alumni and current and former staff.
Logo University of Nottingham

University of Nottingham

Nottingham

The University of Nottingham is a public research university based in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom. It was founded as University College Nottingham in 1881 and granted a Royal Charter in 1948.

Nottingham's main campus, University Park, is situated on the outskirts of the City of Nottingham, with a number of smaller campuses and a teaching hospital (Queen's Medical Centre) located elsewhere in Nottinghamshire. Outside the United Kingdom, Nottingham has campuses in Semenyih, Malaysia and Ningbo, China. Nottingham is organised into five constituent faculties, within which there are more than 50 departments, institutes and research centres. Nottingham has about 44,000 students and 9,000 staff and had a total income of £520 million in 2012/13, of which £100 million was from research grants and contracts.

Several of its subjects have been consistently ranked in the top ten, including Economics, Law, and Pharmacy. It is ranked 5th in England in terms of the number of students and 15th for the proportion of students who achieved AAB+ at A-level. The university is one of 12 "elite" institutions that accommodates the top achieving students in England. A 2014 survey suggested it is the most targeted university by the UK's top employers. In 2012 Nottingham was ranked 13th in the world in terms of the number of alumni listed among CEOs of the Fortune Global 500. It is also ranked 2nd (joint with Oxford) in the 2012 Summer Olympics table of British medal winners. In the 2011 and 2014 GreenMetric World University Rankings, Nottingham was the world's most sustainable campus.

It is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the Virgo Consortium, the European University Association, the Russell Group, Universities UK, Universitas 21 and participates in the Sutton Trust Summer School programme.
Logo University of Leeds

University of Leeds

LeedsMedicine, General, Internal

The University of Leeds is a redbrick university located in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. Originally named the Yorkshire College of Science and later simply the Yorkshire College, it incorporated the Leeds School of Medicine and became part of the federal Victoria University alongside Owens College (which eventually became the University of Manchester) and University College Liverpool (which became the University of Liverpool). In 1904, a royal charter, created in 1903, was granted to the University of Leeds by King Edward VII.

The university has around 33,500 students, the eighth-highest number of any university in the UK. From 2006 to present, the university has consistently been ranked second in the United Kingdom for the number of applications received, second only to the University of Manchester. Leeds had a total income of £547.3 million in 2010/11, of which £124 million was from research grants and contracts. The university has financial endowments of £49.3 million (2009–10), ranking outside the top ten British universities by financial endowment.

The university is a founding member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities, the N8 Group for research collaboration, the Worldwide Universities Network, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, the White Rose University Consortium, the Santander Network and CDIO and is also affiliated to the Association of MBAs, EQUIS and Universities UK.

Leeds is ranked nationally between 19th (Times Higher Education) and 28th (The Guardian). Internationally, the university is ranked as the 41st best in Europe and globally ranked 97th in the 2014 QS World University Rankings and 101–150 (2014 ARWU). Leeds was ranked 8th in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, the best result in the Yorkshire and the Humber region and in 2010, Leeds was ranked as the 9th most targeted British university by graduate employers.

Notable alumni include former Secretary of State Jack Straw, former co-chairman of the Conservative Party Sayeeda Warsi, American actor Chris Pine, Piers Sellers (NASA astronaut) and five Nobel laureates.
Logo University of Edinburgh

University of Edinburgh

EdinburghComputer Science, Robotics

The University of Edinburgh (abbreviated as Edin. in post-nominals), founded in 1582, is the sixth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's ancient universities. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city of Edinburgh, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university.

The University of Edinburgh is ranked 17th in the world by the 2013–14 and 2014–15 QS rankings. The Research Excellence Framework, a research ranking used by the UK government to determine future research funding, ranked Edinburgh 4th in the UK for research power, with Computer Science and Informatics ranking 1st in the UK. It is ranked 12th in the world in arts and humanities by the 2014–15 Times Higher Education Ranking. It is ranked the 15th most employable university in the world by the 2013 Global Employability University Ranking. It is ranked as the 6th best university in Europe by the U.S. News' Best Global Universities Ranking. It is a member of both the Russell Group, and the League of European Research Universities, a consortium of 21 research universities in Europe. It has the third largest endowment of any university in the United Kingdom, after the universities of Cambridge and Oxford.

The university played an important role in leading Edinburgh to its reputation as a chief intellectual centre during the Age of Enlightenment, and helped give the city the nickname of the Athens of the North. Alumni of the university include some of the major figures of modern history, including physicist James Clerk Maxwell, naturalist Charles Darwin, philosopher David Hume, mathematician Thomas Bayes, surgeon Joseph Lister, signatories of the American declaration of independence James Wilson, John Witherspoon and Benjamin Rush, inventor Alexander Graham Bell, first president of Tanzania Julius Nyerere, and a host of famous authors such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, J.M. Barrie and Sir Walter Scott. Associated people include 20 Nobel Prize winners, 2 Turing Award winners, 1 Abel Prize winner, 1 Fields Medal winner, 1 Pulitzer Prize winner, 3 Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom, 2 currently-sitting UK Supreme Court Justices, and several Olympic gold medallists. It continues to have links to the British Royal Family, having had the Duke of Edinburgh as its Chancellor from 1953 to 2010 and Princess Anne since 2011.

Edinburgh receives approximately 50,000 applications every year, making it the fourth most popular university in the UK by volume of applicants. Entrance is competitive, with 2012–2013 having an acceptance rate of 11.5% and offer rate of 38.6%. After St Andrews, it is the most difficult university to gain admission into in Scotland, and 9th overall in the UK.
Logo University of Birmingham

University of Birmingham

BirminghamMedicine, General, InternalSurgery

The University of Birmingham (informally Birmingham University) is a public research university located in Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Queen's College, Birmingham (founded in 1828 as the Birmingham School of Medicine and Surgery) and Mason Science College (established in 1875 by Sir Josiah Mason), making it the first English civic or 'red brick' university to receive its own royal charter. It is a founding member of both the Russell Group of British research universities and the international network of research universities, Universitas 21.

The university was ranked 11th in the UK and 64th in the world in the QS World University Rankings for 2014-15. In 2013, Birmingham was named 'University of the Year 2014' in the Times Higher Education awards. The Global Employability University Ranking conducted by THES places Birmingham at 57th world-wide. Birmingham is also ranked 4th in the UK for Graduate Prospects in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015.

The student population includes around 19,000 undergraduate and 9,000 postgraduate students, which is the 11th largest in the UK. The annual income of the institution for 2013–14 was £528.2 million, with an expenditure of £499 million.

The university is home to the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, housing works by Van Gogh, Picasso and Monet, the Lapworth Museum of Geology, the Cadbury Research Library home to the Mingana Collections of Middle Eastern manuscripts and the Chamberlain Collection, and the Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower, which is a prominent landmark visible from many parts of the city. Academics and alumni of the university include former British Prime Ministers Neville Chamberlain, and Stanley Baldwin, and eight Nobel laureates.
Logo Edge Hill University

Edge Hill University

Ormskirk

Edge Hill University is a campus-based public university situated in Ormskirk, Lancashire, England. The institution was opened on 24 January 1885 as Edge Hill College, the first non-denominational teacher training college for women in England, before admitting its first male students in 1959. In 2005, Edge Hill was granted Taught Degree Awarding Powers by the Privy Council and became Edge Hill University on 18 May 2006.

Edge Hill was named University of the Year in 2014 in the 10th annual Times Higher Education Awards. The University had been shortlisted three times previously, 2007/8, 2010/11 and 2011/12 making it the only university to be shortlisted four times in seven years. In 2015 the university was named the Times Higher Education's Best University Workplace after claiming the number one spot in all four key markers of a contented workforce in the Times Higher Education (THE) Best University Workplace Survey.

The university's campus is situated in Ormskirk in West Lancashire and was named the safest campus to live at in the North West and the fifth-safest in the country by The Complete University Guide. A focus on sustainability has resulted in Edge Hill winning a Green Flag Award as well as a commendation in the 2011 Green Gown Awards made by the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges.

The university has three faculties: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Health and Social Care which teach at both undergraduate and post-graduate level.
Logo Ulster University

Ulster University

Coleraine

Ulster University (Irish: Ollscoil Uladh, Ulster Scots: Ulstèr Universitie or Ulstèr Varsitie) is a multi-campus, co-educational university located in Northern Ireland. It is the second largest university in Ireland, after the federal National University of Ireland. The university was established in 1968 as the New University of Ulster, merged with Ulster Polytechnic in 1984, and can trace its roots back to 1845 when Magee College was endowed in Derry, and 1849, when the School of Art and Design was inaugurated in Belfast. The University held the name University of Ulster for a number of years before rebranding in October 2014 as Ulster University.

The university incorporated its four campuses in 1984 under the University of Ulster banner; these are located in Belfast, Coleraine (site of the administrative headquarters), Magee College in Derry, and Jordanstown. The university has branch campuses in both London and Birmingham, and an extensive distance learning provision.

Ulster is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, Universities Ireland and Universities UK.

The university has one of the highest further study and/or employment rates in the UK, with 95% of graduates being in work or undertaking further study six months after they have completed their degree. In the 2008 RAE 86% of research activity at the university was rated as being of international quality, with 20% being classified as world-leading. Of particular note are the submissions within Biomedical Sciences, the Institute of Nursing and Health Research and Celtic Studies, which were all ranked within the top three for UK universities.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 exercise identified Ulster University as one of the top five universities in the UK for world-leading research in law, biomedical sciences, nursing and art and design; under some metrics, it ranked Ulster University top in Northern Ireland for research into biomedical sciences, law, business and management, architecture and built environment, art and design, social policy, sport, media studies and nursing.
Logo Nottingham Trent University

Nottingham Trent University

NottinghamBusinessEcology, Evolution, Environment

Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a public university in Nottingham, England. It was founded as a new university in 1992 from Trent Polytechnic (later Nottingham Polytechnic). Its roots go back to 1843 with the establishment of the Nottingham Government School of Design which still exists within the university today. It is one of the largest universities in the UK with around 28,000 students split over three different campuses.

Nottingham Trent University was ranked in the number 700 and above (701+) category in the world by the QS World University Rankings. In 2008 The Complete University Guide named Nottingham Trent the "top post-1992 University" in the country. The university has "one of the best employability records of any university in England and Wales". It maintains close ties to over 6,000 businesses and 94% of students progress to full-time employment or further education within six months of graduating.The Guardian calls Nottingham Trent "the most environmentally friendly university in the country".

In 2009 it was awarded the title of "the most environmentally friendly university in the UK", by The People & Planet Green League (the only independent ranking of British universities' environmental and ethical performance). Also since 2009, 100% of the university's electricity has been generated by renewable sources.

The university has a strong research arm with, in 2008, 74% of the university's research considered of "international status" and "an impressive 8% ranked as world-leading". The 2014 REF upgraded the status of the university's research, with 90% considered of either "world-leading", "internationally-excellent", or "internationally-recognised" status.
Logo King's College London

King's College London

LondonMedicine, General, InternalNursingPsychiatry

King's College London (informally King's or KCL; formerly styled King's College, London) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious universities, forming a part of the academic 'golden triangle' of highly research intensive and elite southern English universities.

King's was founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829 and received its royal charter in the same year, making it arguably the third-oldest university in England. St Thomas' Hospital, which is now a teaching hospital of King's College London School of Medicine, the Europe's largest healthcare training facility, which has roots dating back to 1173 with its medical school established in 1550. King's became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with Queen Elizabeth College and Chelsea College of Science and Technology (in 1985), the Institute of Psychiatry (in 1997), and the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals and Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery (in 1998).

King's has its main campus on the Strand in central London, and has three other Thames-side campuses and another in Denmark Hill in south London. Its academic activities are organised into nine faculties which are subdivided into numerous departments, centres and research divisions. King's is the largest centre for graduate and post-graduate medical teaching and biomedical research in Europe; it is home to six Medical Research Council centres and is a founding member of the King's Health Partners academic health sciences centre. It is a member of numerous academic organisations, including the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association and the Russell Group. King's has around 25,000 students and 6,113 staff and had a total income of £604 million in 2013/14, of which £172 million was from research grants and contracts.

King's is known for its several noted alumni and staff, including 12 Nobel Prize laureates amongst King's alumni and current and former faculty. The university performs highly in international rankings, in 2015 it ranked 19th in the world (5th in the UK and 7th in Europe) in the QS World University Rankings, and 40th in the world (7th in the UK and 10th in Europe) in the 2014 Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In rankings produced by Times Higher Education based upon the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, King's was ranked 6th overall for "research power" and 7th for GPA. In a survey by The New York Times assessing the most valued graduates by business leaders, King's College London graduates ranked 22nd in the world and 5th in the UK. In the 2014 Global Employability University Survey of international recruiters King's is ranked 35th in the world and 7th in the UK.
Logo University of Hertfordshire

University of Hertfordshire

HatfieldAerospaceAstronomy, AstrophysicsBusinessArchitectureHistoryPharmacology, Pharmacy

The University of Hertfordshire is a public research university in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. The university is based largely in Hatfield, Hertfordshire. Its antecedent institution, Hatfield Technical College, was founded in 1952 and was identified as one of 25 Colleges of Technology in the United Kingdom in 1959. In 1992, Hatfield Polytechnic was granted university status by the British government and subsequently renamed University of Hertfordshire. From the time it was awarded university status, Hertfordshire's enrolment has steadily increased. As of 2013, it has 25,130 students and 2,358 staff, 812 of which are academic members of staff. It has more than 5,200 international students and a global network of more than 160,000 alumni. Hertfordshire is a member of Association of Commonwealth Universities and University Alliance. The university has an annual turnover of £234m.

The University's academic activities are organised into 11 schools, within which there are around 50 academic departments and 24 research centres. The university has a unique history in training aerospace engineers. The university offers courses in architecture, astronomy, business, computing, education, engineering, humanities, natural sciences, pharmacy and social sciences. Hertfordshire is recognised as internationally excellent and world leading for research in the field of History.

The University of Hertfordshire is recognised as one Hertfordshire's largest employers with over 2,700 staff and a turnover of more than £235 million. With a student community of over 24,500 including more than 2,000 international students. The university exhibits an international character with 85 countries represented in its student body. It also has a global network of over 165,000 alumni. It has good transport links to the rest of the UK, with London only 25 minutes by train, and the University's own bus company providing student transport.

The University of Hertfordshire is recognised for its excellent teaching and focus on employability of its graduates. It takes a flexible approach to learning, teaching and research, offering e-learning and part-time study options. The creative and entrepreneurial environment is enhanced by close links with business and professions, providing great opportunities for work placements and travel.
Logo Birmingham City University

Birmingham City University

BirminghamBusinessLawEcology, Evolution, Environment

Birmingham City University (abbrev. as BCU; and previously Birmingham Polytechnic and the University of Central England in Birmingham) is a newly established British university in the city of Birmingham, England. It is the second largest of five universities in the city, the other four being Aston University, University of Birmingham, University College Birmingham, and Newman University. It is the third most highly ranked of the five universities in Birmingham according to the Complete University Guide, below both the University of Birmingham and Aston University. Initially established as the Birmingham College of Art with roots dating back to 1843, it was designated as a polytechnic in 1971 and gained university status in 1992.

The university has three main campuses serving four faculties, and offers courses in art and design, business, the built environment, computing, education, engineering, English, healthcare, law, the performing arts, social sciences, and technology. A £125million extension to its campus in the city centre of Birmingham, part of the Eastside development of a new technology and learning quarter, is opening in two stages, with the first phase having opened its doors in 2013. The university is a member of the million+ group of New Universities.

Roughly half of the university's full-time students are from the West Midlands, and a large percentage of these are from ethnic minorities. The university runs access and foundation programmes through an international network of associated universities and further education colleges, and has the highest intake of foreign students in the Birmingham area.
Logo University of Warwick

University of Warwick

CoventryBusinessMedicine, General, Internal

The University of Warwick ((/ˈwɒrɪk/)) is a public research university in Coventry, England. It was founded in 1965 as part of a government initiative to expand access to higher education. Warwick Business School was established in 1967 and Warwick Medical School was opened in 2000. Warwick merged with Coventry College of Education in 1979 and Horticulture Research International in 2004.

Warwick is primarily based on a 290 hectare campus on the outskirts of Coventry with a satellite campus in Wellesbourne and a London base at the Shard in central London. It is organised into four faculties—Arts, Medicine, Science and Social Sciences—within which there are 32 departments. Warwick has around 23,400 full-time students and 1,390 academic and research staff and had a total income of £481 million in 2013/14, of which £90 million was from research grants and contracts. Warwick Arts Centre, a multi-venue arts complex in the university's main campus, is the largest venue of its kind in the UK outside London.

Warwick consistently ranks in the top ten of all major domestic rankings of British universities and is the only multi-faculty institution aside from Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial to have never been ranked outside of the top ten. It is ranked by QS as the world's third best university under 50 years (and first in Europe) and as the world's 13th best university based on employer reputation. It was ranked 7th in the UK amongst multi-faculty institutions for the quality of its research in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. Entrance is competitive, with around 6.74 applicants per place for undergraduate study.

Warwick is a member of AACSB, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the Association of MBAs, EQUIS, the European University Association, the M5 Group, the Russell Group and Universities UK. It is the only European member of the Center for Urban Science and Progress, a collaboration with New York University. The university has extensive commercial activities, including the University of Warwick Science Park and Warwick Manufacturing Group.
Logo University of Wolverhampton

University of Wolverhampton

WolverhamptonNursing

The University of Wolverhampton is an English university located on four campuses across the West Midlands, Shropshire and Staffordshire. The city campus is located in Wolverhampton city centre, with a second campus at Walsall and a third in Telford. There is an additional fourth campus in Wolverhampton at the University of Wolverhampton Science Park. The university also operates a Health Education Centre in Burton-upon-Trent for nursing students.

The university's roots lie in the 19th-century growth of the Wolverhampton Free Library (1870) whose evening classes were formalised as the Science, Technical and Commercial School in 1899, and grew into the Wolverhampton and Staffordshire Technical College in 1926. It was renamed Wolverhampton and Staffordshire College of Technology in 1951 and became Wolverhampton College of Technology in 1966 following county boundary changes. Wolverhampton School of Art was founded in 1851, becoming the Municipal School of Art in 1878, and finally Wolverhampton College of Art in 1950. Wolverhampton College of Technology merged with Wolverhampton College of Art in 1969 to form The Polytechnic, Wolverhampton in 1969. The Polytechnic changed its name to Wolverhampton Polytechnic in 1988 and gained university status as the University of Wolverhampton in 1992.

The university has seven academic schools/faculties and several cross-disciplinary research centres and institutes. It has approximately 23,000 students and currently offers over 380 undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The university is noted for its success in encouraging wider participation in higher education.
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University of Southampton

Southampton

The University of Southampton (occasionally abbreviated as Soton) is a public research university located in Southampton, England. Southampton is a research intensive university and a founding member of the Russell Group of elite British universities.

The origins of the university date back to the founding of the Hartley Institution in 1862 following a legacy to the Corporation of Southampton by Henry Robinson Hartley. In 1902, the Institution developed into the Hartley University College, with degrees awarded by the University of London. On 29 April 1952, the institution was granted a Royal Charter to give the University of Southampton full university status. It is a member of the European University Association, the Association of Commonwealth Universities and is an accredited institution of the Worldwide Universities Network.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework Southampton was ranked 8th for research intensity. Besides being recognised as one of the leading research universities in the UK, Southampton has also achieved consistently high scores for its teaching and learning activities. It additionally has one of the highest proportions of income derived from research activities in Britain, and is regularly ranked in the top 100 universities in the world. As of 2014 Southampton is one of the few universities to achieve a top 20 UK position in the most established national and international rankings (along Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, LSE and Warwick).

The University of Southampton currently has over 16,000 undergraduate and 7,000 postgraduate students, making it the largest university by higher education students in the South East region. The university has seven teaching campuses. The main campus is located in the Highfield area of Southampton and is supplemented by four other campuses within the city: Avenue Campus housing the Faculty of Humanities, the National Oceanography Centre housing courses in Ocean and Earth Sciences, Southampton General Hospital offering courses in Medicine and Health Sciences, and Boldrewood Campus an engineering and maritime technology campus housing also the university's strategic ally Lloyd's Register. In addition, the university operates a School of Art based in nearby Winchester and an international branch in Malaysia offering courses in Engineering. Each campus is equipped with its own library facilities.

The university has over 5000 places at university-owned halls of residence, spread over two main complexes and several other smaller halls located within a couple of miles from the university. The University of Southampton Students' Union, provides support, representation and social activities for the students ranging from involvement in the Union's four media outlets to any of the 200 affiliated societies and 80 sports. The university owns and operates a sports ground at nearby Wide Lane for use by students and also operates a sports centre on the main campus. Highfield Campus also houses three main art venues supported by the university and Arts Council England.
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University of Glasgow

GlasgowLawUrban StudiesMedicine, General, Internal

The University of Glasgow (Scottish Gaelic: Oilthigh Ghlaschu, Latin: Universitas Glasguensis) is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. It was founded in 1451. Along with the University of Edinburgh, the University was part of the Scottish Enlightenment during the 18th century. It is currently a member of Universitas 21, the international network of research universities.

In common with universities of the pre-modern era, Glasgow originally educated students primarily from wealthy backgrounds, however it became a pioneer in British higher education in the 19th century by also providing for the needs of students from the growing urban and commercial middle class. Glasgow served all of these students by preparing them for professions: the law, medicine, civil service, teaching, and the church. It also trained smaller but growing numbers for careers in science and engineering.

Originally located in the city's High Street, since 1870 the main University campus has been located at Gilmorehill in the West End of the city. Additionally, a number of university buildings are located elsewhere, such as the University Marine Biological Station Millport on the Island of Cumbrae in the Firth of Clyde and the Crichton Campus in Dumfries.

Alumni or former staff of the University include philosopher Francis Hutcheson, engineer James Watt, economist Adam Smith, physicist Lord Kelvin, surgeon Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister, seven Nobel laureates, and two British Prime Ministers.
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Newcastle University

Newcastle upon TynePhysicsMedicine, General, InternalSurgeryAgriculture, Fisheries, Food

Newcastle University (formally, the University of Newcastle upon Tyne) is a public research university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the North-East of England. The University can trace its origins to a School of Medicine and Surgery (later the College of Medicine), established in 1834, and to the College of Physical Science (later renamed Armstrong College), founded in 1871. These two colleges came to form one division of the federal University of Durham, with the Durham Colleges forming the other. The Newcastle colleges merged to form King's College in 1937. In 1963, following an Act of Parliament, King's College became the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, and latterly, Newcastle University.

Newcastle University can be described as a red brick university and is a member of the Russell Group, an association of research-intensive UK universities. The university has one of the largest EU research portfolios in the UK. Newcastle attracts over 20,000 students from more than 120 different countries. Teaching and research are delivered in 24 academic schools and 40 research institutes and research centres, spread across three Faculties: the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; the Faculty of Medical Sciences; and the Faculty of Science, Agriculture and Engineering. The university offers around 175 full-time undergraduate degree programmes in a wide range of subject areas spanning arts, sciences, engineering and medicine, together with approximately 340 postgraduate taught and research programmes across a range of disciplines.
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University of Bristol

Bristol

The University of Bristol (abbreviated as Bris. in post-nominal letters, sometimes referred to as Bristol University) is a red brick research university located in Bristol, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1909, and its predecessor institution, University College, Bristol, had been in existence since 1876.

Bristol is organised into six academic faculties composed of multiple schools and departments running over 200 undergraduate courses situated in the Clifton area along with three of its nine halls of residence. The other six halls are located in Stoke Bishop, an outer city suburb located 1.8 miles away. The university had a total income of £485.5 million in 2013/14, of which £131.5 million was from research grants and contracts. It is the largest independent employer in Bristol.

The University of Bristol is ranked 11th in the UK for its research, according to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 by GPA. The University of Bristol has been ranked 37th (joint 34th) by the QS World University Rankings, and is ranked amongst the top ten of UK universities by QS, THE, and ARWU. A highly selective institution, it has an average of 6.4 (Sciences faculty) to 13.1 (Medicine & Dentistry Faculty) applicants for each undergraduate place. Bristol's undergraduate program is highly selective, admitting 7.2% of undergraduate applicants in the 2015-16 admissions cycle (for the Class of 2018-19). The University of Bristol is the youngest British university to be ranked among the top 40 institutions in the world according to the QS World University Rankings.

Current academics include 21 fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences, 13 fellows of the British Academy, 13 fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 44 fellows of the Royal Society. The university has been associated with 11 Nobel laureates throughout its history, including Paul Dirac, Sir William Ramsay, Cecil Frank Powell, Sir Winston Churchill, Dorothy Hodgkin, Hans Albrecht Bethe, Max Delbrück, Gerhard Herzberg, Sir Nevill Francis Mott, Harold Pinter and Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio.

Bristol is a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive British universities, the European-wide Coimbra Group and the Worldwide Universities Network, of which the university's previous vice-chancellor, Eric Thomas, was chairman from 2005 to 2007. In addition, the university holds an Erasmus Charter, sending more than 500 students per year to partner institutions in Europe.
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University of Hull

Hull

The University of Hull is a public university, founded in 1927, located in Kingston upon Hull, a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The main university campus is located in Hull and there is a smaller campus in Scarborough on the North Yorkshire coast. The main campus is home to the Hull York Medical School, a joint initiative with the University of York. Students are served by Hull University Union.

The University's Brynmor Jones Library was the workplace of the poet Philip Larkin who served as its Head Librarian for over thirty years. The Philip Larkin Society organises activities in remembrance of Larkin including the Larkin 25 festival which was organised during 2010 in partnership with the University. The Library was also the workplace of former poet laureate Andrew Motion. Lord Wilberforce was chancellor of the University from 1978 until 1994. Robert Armstrong was the chancellor from 1994 to 2006. Virginia Bottomley was installed as the current chancellor in April 2006.

Alumni of the University of Hull are especially prominent in the fields of politics, academia, journalism and drama. They include former MP and later Deputy Prime Minister Lord Prescott (John Prescott), former MP and Deputy Leader of the Labour Party Lord Hattersley (Roy Hattersley) and current deputy leader Tom Watson (Tom Watson), politician and author Chris Mullin, social scientist Lord Giddens (Anthony Giddens), poet Roger McGough, journalist John McCarthy and film director, playwright and screenwriter Anthony Minghella.
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University of Oxford

Oxford

The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University or simply Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England. While having no known date of foundation, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest surviving university. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled northeast to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two "ancient universities" are frequently jointly referred to as "Oxbridge".

The university is made up of a variety of institutions, including 38 constituent colleges and a full range of academic departments which are organised into four divisions. All the colleges are self-governing institutions as part of the university, each controlling its own membership and with its own internal structure and activities. Being a city university, it does not have a main campus; instead, all the buildings and facilities are scattered throughout the city centre.

Most undergraduate teaching at Oxford is organised around weekly tutorials at the self-governing colleges and halls, supported by classes, lectures and laboratory work provided by university faculties and departments. Oxford is the home of several notable scholarships, including the Clarendon Scholarship which was launched in 2001 and the Rhodes Scholarship which has brought graduate students to study at the university for more than a century. The university operates the largest university press in the world and the largest academic library system in the United Kingdom. Oxford has educated many notable alumni, including 27 Nobel laureates, 26 British prime ministers (most recently David Cameron, the incumbent) and many foreign heads of state.

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