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Logo Qatar University

Qatar University

DohaBusinessEconomicsLawPharmacology, PharmacyMathematics, Statistics, Finance

Qatar University (Arabic: جامعة قطر‎; transliterated: Jami'at Qatar) is a public university in Qatar, located on the northern outskirts of the capital Doha. As of 2014, there are over 16,000 students. Courses are taught in Arabic (in education, arts and social sciences courses) or English (in natural sciences, engineering and business courses). The university is the only government university in the country. The university hosts seven colleges – Arts and Sciences, Business and Economics, Education, Engineering, Law, Sharia and Islamic Studies, and a College of Pharmacy – with a total of almost 8000 students at a 13:1 student-teacher ratio.

Students entering the university are placed in a “Foundation Program”, which ensures the acquirement of skills such as math, English, and computer technology.

Many of its academic departments have received or are currently under evaluation for accreditation from a number of organizations. In addition to undergraduate academics, QU has a research infrastructure including research labs, an ocean vessel, technical equipment and a library housing thousands of books, including a collection of rare manuscripts.

The university serves on behalf of the government and private industry to conduct regional research, particularly in areas of the environment and energy technologies. Qatar University has a student body of fifty-two nationalities, 65% of which are Qatari nationals. About 35% are children of expats. Women make up approximately 70% of the student population, and are provided their own set of facilities and classrooms. QU has an alumni body of over 30,000 graduates.
Logo Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

College StationMechanical Engineering Mining, Mineral Processing Mathematics, Statistics, Finance Agriculture, Fisheries, Food Cultural Studies Languages, Philology, Linguistic Studies Literature

Texas A&M University (Texas A&M, TAMU (/ˈtæmuː/), or A&M) is a coeducational public research university located in College Station, Texas, United States. It is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System, the fourth-largest university in the United States and the largest university in Texas. Texas A&M's designation as a land, sea, and space grant institution reflects a range of research with ongoing projects funded by agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. The school ranks in the top 20 American research institutes in funding and has made contributions to such fields as animal cloning and petroleum engineering.

The first public institution of higher education in Texas, the school opened on October 4, 1876 as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas under the provisions of the Morrill Land-Grant Acts. Originally, the college taught no classes in agriculture, instead concentrating on classical studies, languages, literature, and applied mathematics. After four years, students could attain degrees in scientific agriculture, civil and mining engineering, and language and literature. Under the leadership of President James Earl Rudder in the 1960s, A&M desegregated, became coeducational, and dropped the requirement for participation in the Corps of Cadets. To reflect the institution's expanded roles and academic offerings, the Texas Legislature renamed the school to Texas A&M University in 1963. The letters "A&M", originally short for "Agricultural and Mechanical", are retained only as a link to the university's past. The school's students, alumni, and sports teams are known as Aggies.

The main campus is one of the largest in the United States, spanning 5,200 acres (21 km2), and includes the George Bush Presidential Library. About one-fifth of the student body lives on campus. Texas A&M has approximately 1,000 officially recognized student organizations. Many students also observe the traditions of Texas A&M University, which govern daily life, as well as special occasions, including sports events. On July 1, 2012, the school joined the Southeastern Conference. A&M operates two branches: Texas A&M at Qatar and Texas A&M University at Galveston. Working with agencies such as the Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M has a direct presence in each of the 254 counties in Texas. The university offers degrees in over 150 courses of study through ten colleges and houses 18 research institutes. Texas A&M has awarded over 320,000 degrees, including 70,000 graduate and professional degrees.

As a Senior Military College, Texas A&M is one of six American public universities with a full-time, volunteer Corps of Cadets who study alongside civilian undergraduate students.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon University

PittsburghMusic

Carnegie Mellon University (Carnegie Mellon or CMU; /ˈkɑrnɨɡi ˈmɛlən/ or /kɑrˈneɪɡi ˈmɛlən/) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The university began as the Carnegie Technical Schools founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1900. In 1912, the school became the Carnegie Institute of Technology and began granting four-year degrees. In 1967, the Carnegie Institute of Technology merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research to form Carnegie Mellon University. The university's 140-acre (57 ha) main campus is 3 miles (4.8 km) from Downtown Pittsburgh and abuts the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, the main branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, the Carnegie Music Hall, Schenley Park, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, the Pittsburgh Golf Club, and the campus of the University of Pittsburgh in the city's Oakland and Squirrel Hill neighborhoods, partially extending into Shadyside.

Carnegie Mellon has seven colleges and independent schools: the College of Engineering, College of Fine Arts, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Mellon College of Science, Tepper School of Business, H. John Heinz III College and the School of Computer Science.

Carnegie Mellon fields 19 varsity athletic teams, most of which compete in the University Athletic Association conference of the NCAA Division III.

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