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Logo University of Oslo

University of Oslo

OsloMathematics, Statistics, FinanceLawUrban StudiesTheology, ReligionDentistry, Oral SurgeryMedicine, General, Internal

The University of Oslo (Norwegian: Universitetet i Oslo), until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University (Norwegian: Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), is the oldest, largest and most prestigious university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. The university is recognized as one of Northern Europe's most prestigious universities. The Academic Ranking of World Universities has ranked it the 58th best university in the world.

The university has approximately 27,700 students and employs around 6,000 people. Its faculties include (Lutheran) Theology (Norway's state religion since 1536), Law, Medicine, Humanities, Mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, Dentistry, and Education. The university's original neoclassical campus is located in the centre of Oslo; it is currently occupied by the Faculty of Law. Most of the university's other faculties are located at the newer Blindern campus in the suburban West End. The Faculty of Medicine is split between several university hospitals in the Oslo area.

The university was founded in 1811 and was modelled after the University of Copenhagen and the recently established University of Berlin. It was originally named for King Frederick VI of Denmark and Norway, and received its current name in 1939. The university is informally also known as Universitetet ("the university"), having been the only university in Norway until 1946, and was commonly referred to as "The Royal Frederick's" (Det Kgl. Frederiks) prior to the name change.

The University of Oslo is home to five Nobel Prize winners. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in the university's Atrium from 1947 to 1989. Since 2003, the Abel Prize is awarded in the Atrium.
Logo University of Tromsø

University of Tromsø

TromsøEcology, Evolution, EnvironmentAgriculture, Fisheries, FoodBiology, Biochemistry, BiotechnologyCultural StudiesLanguages, Philology, Linguistic Studies

The University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway (Norwegian: Universitetet i Tromsø – Norges arktiske universitet; is the world's northernmost university. Located in the city of Tromsø, Norway, it was established in 1968, and opened in 1972. It is one of eight universities in Norway. The University of Tromsø is the largest research and educational institution in northern Norway. The University's location makes it a natural venue for the development of studies of the region's natural environment, culture, and society.

The main focus of the University's activities is on the Auroral light research, Space science, Fishery science, Biotechnology, Linguistics, Multicultural societies, Saami culture, Telemedicine, epidemiology and a wide spectrum of Arctic research projects. The close vicinity of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research and the Polar Environmental Centre gives Tromsø added weight and importance as an international centre for Arctic research. Research activities, however, are not limited to Arctic studies. The University researchers work within a broad range of subjects and are recognised both nationally and internationally.

On January 1, 2009 the University of Tromsø merged with Tromsø University College.

On August 1, 2013 the university merged with Finnmark University College to form Universitetet i Tromsø – Norges arktiske universitet (The University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway), thereby adding campuses in Alta, Hammerfest and Kirkenes.
Logo Faculty of Law, University of Oslo

Faculty of Law, University of Oslo

OsloLawCriminology, PenologyEconomicsSociology

The Faculty of Law (Norwegian: Det juridiske fakultet) of the University of Oslo is Norway's oldest law faculty, established in 1811 as one of the four original faculties of The Royal Frederick University (renamed the University of Oslo in 1939). Alongside the law faculties in Copenhagen, Lund and Uppsala, it is one of Scandinavia's leading institutions of legal education and research.

Prior to 1811, the University of Copenhagen was the only university of Denmark-Norway, and the curriculum of the new law faculty in Christiania (renamed Oslo in 1925) was based on that of the University of Copenhagen Faculty of Law and long retained strong similarities, even after the dissolution of the Dano-Norwegian union in 1814. As the only faculty of law in Norway until 1980, it traditionally educated all lawyers of Norway and remains the country's most important law faculty, educating around 75% of all new legal candidates in Norway. Its law programme is one of the most competitive programmes to get into at any Norwegian university, with an acceptance rate of 12%. The faculty offers education and conducts research in both law and in related areas such as criminology and sociology of law, and historically also in economics (its former Dean, Ragnar Frisch, was awarded the first Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences).

The faculty occupies the old university campus in the centre of Oslo, near the National Theatre, the Royal Palace, and the Parliament, constructed 1841–1851 by Christian Heinrich Grosch with the assistance of world famous Prussian architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel in Schinkel's neoclassical style, with strong similarities to Schinkel's famous museums on the Museum Island in Berlin. The old campus includes three main buildings, called Domus Academica, Domus Media and Domus Bibliotheca, centered on the University Square and facing Karl Johans gate. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in the atrium of the central building of the old campus, Domus Media, 1947–1989, and since 2003, the Abel Prize is also awarded in this building. The Parliament of Norway convened in the Old Ceremonial Hall in Domus Academica 1854–1866. The faculty publishes several academic journals, including the English-language journal Oslo Law Review.
Logo University of Oslo

University of Oslo

OsloMathematics, Statistics, Finance Law Urban Studies Theology, Religion Dentistry, Oral Surgery Medicine, General, Internal

The University of Oslo (Norwegian: Universitetet i Oslo), until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University (Norwegian: Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), is the oldest, largest and most prestigious university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. The university is recognized as one of Northern Europe's most prestigious universities. The Academic Ranking of World Universities has ranked it the 58th best university in the world.

The university has approximately 27,700 students and employs around 6,000 people. Its faculties include (Lutheran) Theology (Norway's state religion since 1536), Law, Medicine, Humanities, Mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, Dentistry, and Education. The university's original neoclassical campus is located in the centre of Oslo; it is currently occupied by the Faculty of Law. Most of the university's other faculties are located at the newer Blindern campus in the suburban West End. The Faculty of Medicine is split between several university hospitals in the Oslo area.

The university was founded in 1811 and was modelled after the University of Copenhagen and the recently established University of Berlin. It was originally named for King Frederick VI of Denmark and Norway, and received its current name in 1939. The university is informally also known as Universitetet ("the university"), having been the only university in Norway until 1946, and was commonly referred to as "The Royal Frederick's" (Det Kgl. Frederiks) prior to the name change.

The University of Oslo is home to five Nobel Prize winners. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in the university's Atrium from 1947 to 1989. Since 2003, the Abel Prize is awarded in the Atrium.
Logo Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics, NTNU

Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics, NTNU

TrondheimEarth ScienceDance

The Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics (IPT) was established in 1973, shortly after the start of production (Ekofisk field) from the Norwegian continental shelf. The department came to include Petroleum Engineering as well as Geophysics, which is seen as a major strength of the petroleum education at NTNU. The department has elected chairman and vice chairman, and 4 informal groups of professors; geophysics, drilling, production and reservoir engineering. The stated primary purpose of maintaining the informal groups is to take care of the teaching in their respective disciplines. Each group is responsible for offering a sufficient number of courses, semester projects and thesis projects at M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels in their discipline, and to make annual revisions of these in accordance with the needs of society and industry. The total number of professors, associate professors, assistant professors and adjunct professors is 32. The administrative staff is led by a department administrator, and consists of a total of 6 secretaries. The technical support staff reports to the department head, and consists of 8 engineers and technicians. Until 2000, the department was part of the Applied Earth Sciences faculty, together with the Geology-department. After that, the department is part of the Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology (one of a total of 10 departments).
Logo Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

TrondheimPhysics Architecture Medicine, General, Internal

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norwegian: Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, abbreviated NTNU) is a public research university located in the city of Trondheim, Norway. NTNU is the second largest of the eight universities in Norway, and, as its name suggests, has the main national responsibility for higher education in engineering and technology. In addition to engineering and the natural and physical sciences, the university offers advanced degrees in other academic disciplines ranging from the social sciences, the arts, medicine, architecture and fine art.

Norwegian Theatre Academy

TheatrePhysics

The Norwegian Theatre Academy is a department of the Østfold University College and is located in Fredrikstad, approximately 80 km from Oslo.

Norwegian Theatre Academy offers a challenging undergraduate education in theatre and welcomes aspiring performing artists and scenographers who wish to explore the interaction between visual art and theatre, between theatre and society, and between theory and practice. Through a strategy that emphasizes collaboration between the two degree programs - scenography and acting - students are provided with training that combines the skills, knowledge and methods from conceptual visual art with the skills, techniques and methods of classical and contemporary theatre. Particular focus is placed on physical theatre, devised performance, and multi-disciplinary work.

Under the supervision of the leadership, students work with international guest artists and teachers in an intimate setting that allows close individual attention in both independent projects and directed productions. The goals are to challenge students to think about performance and scenography in innovative ways, to help them develop their own artistic practice, and to prepare them to meet the professional demands of working with directors, choreographers, filmmakers, composers, playwrights and other artists in both traditional and experimental genres.

The Academy functions as a meeting place for students and artists from around the world who are a vital part of creating tomorrow's artistic expression. As a consequence of this international profile, all tuition is in English.

School of Business and Law (University of Agder)

BusinessLawEconomics

School of Business and Law at the University of Agder, Norway, builds on academic traditions that dates back to 1969 when the two-year economics and business administration programme was a cornerstone of Agder Regional College (ADH) in Kristiansand. In 1994 ADH was included in Agder University College (HiA) as a result of a national reform, and in 2007 the University of Agder (UiA) was established.

A four-year programme in economics and business administration has been given since 1988 and since 1992 the title siviløkonom has been awarded. The school comprises as a faculty all study programmes at the University of Agder in the fields of business administration and law. In autumn 2013 nearly 1 700 students was registrered at study programmes belonging to the School of Business and Law. (Source DBH

The School’s main base is in Kristiansand, but it has students and staff at both UiA campuses in Kristiansand and Grimstad.

The School of Business and Law is formally organized as a faculty at the University of Agder, which was nationally accredited university by NOKUT (Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education) in 2007. The School of Business and Law is a member of EFMD and AACSB, and is currently working with international accreditation.

The School’s main base is in Kristiansand, but it has students and staff at both UiA campuses in Kristiansand and Grimstad.

The School of Business and Law is formally organized as a faculty at the University of Agder, which was nationally accredited university by NOKUT (Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education) in 2007. The School of Business and Law is a member of EFMD and AACSB, and is currently working with international accreditation.

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