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Logo University of British Columbia

University of British Columbia

VancouverBusinessMedicine, General, Internal

The University of British Columbia, commonly referred to as UBC, is a public Canadian research university based in British Columbia. Founded in 1908 as the McGill University College of British Columbia, the University became independent and adopted its current name in 1915. It is the oldest institution of higher learning in British Columbia and enrolls over 58,000 students at its Vancouver and Okanagan Valley campuses. UBC's 4.02 km2 (993-acre) Vancouver campus is located within the University Endowment Lands, about 10 km (6 mi) west of Downtown Vancouver. The 2.09 km2 (516-acre) Okanagan campus, acquired in 2005, is located in Kelowna.

The University offers degrees and diplomas in over 300 fields of study, and in 2014 granted 12,421 degrees. Most students are enrolled in five larger Faculties, namely Arts, Science, Medicine, Applied Science and the Sauder School of Business. As of the 2014-2015 school year, UBC and its donors provided $35 million in scholarships annually. Estimated at $21,790 per student, the University maintains one of the largest endowments among Canadian universities on a per-student basis. With a research budget valued at $564 million, UBC funds 8,442 projects as of 2014.

According to Maclean's UBC has the second highest average entering grade among Canadian universities. UBC faculty, alumni, and researchers have won seven Nobel Prizes, 69 Rhodes Scholarships, 65 Olympic medals, 195 fellowships to the Royal Society of Canada, and alumni include two Canadian prime ministers. The University is ranked 30th in the world in U.S. News & World Report's 2015 rankings, 32nd in the world in the 2014-2015 Times Higher Education World University Rankings, 50th in the world in the 2015 QS World University Rankings and eighth among universities outside the United States by Newsweek.

UBC is a non-sectarian and coeducational institution, with more than 300,000 living alumni in 120 countries. The University is a member of Universitas 21, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, the Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning, the International Association of Universities, the U15 and the only Canadian member of the Association of Pacific Rim Universities. The University's varsity teams, known as the Thunderbirds in Vancouver and the Heat in the Okanagan, compete in the Canada West Universities Athletic Association of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistoryCommunication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo Concordia University

Concordia University

MontréalLanguages, Philology, Linguistic Studies

Concordia University (commonly referred to as Concordia) is a Canadian public comprehensive university with campuses and facilities in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Founded in 1974 following the merger of Loyola College and Sir George Williams University, Concordia is one of the two universities in Montreal where English is the primary language of instruction. As of the 2011-2012 academic year, there were 45,954 students enrolled at Concordia, making the university among the largest in Canada by enrollment. The university has two campuses, set approximately seven km apart: Sir George Williams Campus in the downtown core of Montreal, in an area known as Quartier Concordia and Loyola Campus in the residential district of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. With four faculties, a school of graduate studies and numerous colleges, centres and institutes, Concordia offers over 300 undergraduate and 100 graduate programs and courses.

Concordia is ranked 16th among Canadian universities in the 2015-2016 QS World University Rankings and is also included in Times Higher Education's list of the top 100 universities worldwide under 50 years old. Nationally, the 2012 Higher Education Strategy Associates' University Rankings placed Concordia 9th in the field of social science and 20th in science and engineering. The university's John Molson School of Business is consistently ranked within the top ten Canadian business schools, and within the top 100 worldwide. Furthermore, Concordia was ranked 7th among Canadian and 229th among world universities in the International Professional Classification of Higher Education Institutions, a worldwide ranking compiled by the École des Mines de Paris that uses as its sole criterion the number of graduates occupying the rank of Chief Executive Officer at Fortune 500 companies.

Concordia is a non-sectarian and coeducational institution, with over 175,000 living alumni worldwide. The University is a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, the International Association of Universities, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the Canadian Association of Research Libraries, the Canadian University Society for Intercollegiate Debate as well as the Canadian Bureau for International Education and the Canadian University Press. The university's varsity teams, known as the Stingers, compete in the Quebec Student Sport Federation of Canadian Interuniversity Sport.
Logo University of Ottawa

University of Ottawa

Ottawa

The University of Ottawa (uOttawa or U of O) (French: Université d'Ottawa) is a bilingual public research university in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The main campus is located on 42.5 hectares (105 acres) in the residential neighbourhood of Sandy Hill, adjacent to Ottawa's Rideau Canal. The university offers a wide variety of academic programs, administered by ten faculties. It is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada.

The University of Ottawa was first established as the College of Bytown in 1848 by the first bishop of the Catholic Archdiocese of Ottawa, Joseph-Bruno Guigues. Placed under the direction of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, it was renamed the College of Ottawa in 1861 and received university status five years later through royal charter. On 5 February 1889, the university was granted a pontifical charter by Pope Leo XIII, elevating the institution to a pontifical university. The University was reorganized on 1 July 1965 as a corporation, independent from any outside body or religious organization. As a result, the civil and pontifical charters were kept by the newly created Saint Paul University, federated with the university. The remaining civil faculties were retained by the reorganized university.

The university is co-educational and enrolls over 40,000 students, over 35,000 undergraduate and over 6,000 post-graduate students. The university has more than 185,000 alumni. The university's athletic teams are known as the Gee-Gees and are members of Canadian Interuniversity Sport.
Logo University of Alberta

University of Alberta

Edmonton

The University of Alberta (also known as U of A and UAlberta) is a public research university located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. It was founded in 1908 by Alexander Cameron Rutherford, the first premier of Alberta, and Henry Marshall Tory, its first president. Its enabling legislation is the Post-secondary Learning Act.

The university comprises four campuses in Edmonton, the Augustana Campus in Camrose, and a staff centre in downtown Calgary. The original north campus consists of 150 buildings covering 50 city blocks on the south rim of the North Saskatchewan River valley, directly across from downtown Edmonton. More than 39,000 students from across Canada and 150 other countries participate in nearly 400 programs in 18 faculties.

The University of Alberta is a major economic driver in Alberta. The university’s impact on the Alberta economy is an estimated $12.3 billion annually, or five per cent of the province’s gross domestic product. With more than 15,000 employees, the university is Alberta's fourth-largest employer.

The university has been recognized by the Academic Ranking of World Universities, the QS World University Rankings and the Times Higher Education World University Rankings as one of the top five universities in Canada and one of the top 100 universities worldwide.

According to the 2014 QS World University Rankings the top Faculty Area at the University of Alberta is Arts and Humanities (ranked 89th in the world), and the top-ranked Subject is English Language and Literature (22nd in the world).

The University of Alberta has graduated more than 260,000 alumni, including Governor General Roland Michener; Prime Minister Joe Clark; Chief Justice of Canada Beverley McLachlin; Alberta premiers Peter Lougheed, Dave Hancock, Jim Prentice and Rachel Notley; Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson and Nobel laureate Richard E. Taylor.

The university is a member of the Alberta Rural Development Network, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education and the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System.
Logo McGill University

McGill University

Montreal

McGill University is a public research university in Montreal, Canada, officially founded by royal charter in 1821. The University bears the name of James McGill, a prominent Montreal merchant from Scotland whose bequest in 1813 formed precursory McGill College.

McGill's main campus is set at the foot of Mount Royal in Downtown Montreal with the second campus situated near fields and forested lands in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, 30 kilometres west of the downtown campus on the Montreal Island. All the academic units are organized into 11 main Faculties and Schools. The University is one of the two members of Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

McGill offers degrees and diplomas in over 300 fields of studies with the highest average admission grade of any Canadian university. Most students are enrolled in the five larger Faculties, namely Arts, Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Management. Tuition fees vary significantly between in-province, out-of-province, and international students, and the scholarships are very generous yet highly competitive and relatively difficult to attain, compared to other institutions in the country.

McGill counts among its alumni 12 Nobel laureates and 138 Rhodes Scholars, both the most in the country, as well as three astronauts, two Canadian prime ministers, 13 justices of the Canadian Supreme Court, four foreign leaders, 28 foreign ambassadors, nine Academy Award winners, three Pulitzer Prize winners, and 28 Olympic medalists. Throughout its long history, McGill alumni were instrumental in inventing or initially organizing football, basketball, and ice hockey. McGill or its alumni also founded several major universities, including the Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Alberta, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
Logo Carleton University

Carleton University

OttawaBusinessManagementPolitical Science

Carleton University is a comprehensive university located in the capital of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. The enabling legislation is The Carleton University Act, 1952, S.O. 1952. Originally founded on rented premises in 1942, Carleton would grow in size to meet the needs of returning World War II veterans and later became Ontario's first private, non-denominational college. It would expand further in the 1960s, consistent with government policy that saw increased access to higher education as a social good and means to economic growth, and is today a public university, offering more than 65 academic programs across a wide range of disciplines. Carleton is reputed for its strength in a variety of fields, such as engineering, industrial design, humanities, international business and many of the disciplines housed in its Faculty of Public Affairs (including international affairs, journalism, political science, political management, public policy and administration, and legal studies).

It is named after the former Carleton County, Ontario, which included the city of Ottawa at the time Carleton was founded. Carleton County, in turn, was named in honour of Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, an early Governor-General of British North America. Carleton currently houses more than 22,000 undergraduate and more than 3,000 postgraduate students. Its campus is located west of Old Ottawa South, within close proximity to The Glebe and Confederation Heights, and is bounded to the north by the Rideau Canal and Dow's Lake and to the south by the Rideau River. The university is represented in Canadian Interuniversity Sport by the Carleton Ravens.
Logo Akitsiraq Law School

Akitsiraq Law School

IqaluitLawHistory

The Law School has no permanent classrooms, employees or assets, and the admissions process has no formal education requirements. The Akitsiraq Law School focuses on the practical abilities of potential students based on life experience and work history. The program is strongly supported by legal professionals and by members of the Nunavut Judiciary through in-kind and volunteer services, developing effective programs and bringing legal resources from across Canada to teach each Akitsiraq cohort.

Akitsiraq programs have provided legal training to residents of Nunavut and the surrounding Arctic region, leading to professional and para-professional legal qualifications.

The provenance of the name "Akitsiraq" is explained on the school website.

The original program offering was the Akitsiraq Jump-Start Program which partnered with Nunavut Arctic College to provide 16 students with an enhanced background in law. Through this work the Akitsiraq Society was able to develop the Law School model eventually implemented as Akitsiraq I (2001) and II (2011). These four-year programs deliver the equivalent of a Canadian three-year law degree for students in this isolated region and in a strongly Inuit cultural context.

The Akitsiraq I program was a partnership between the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria, Nunavut Arctic College and the Akitsiraq Law School Society. It offered a Bachelor of Laws Degree (LL.B) in Iqaluit, Nunavut. to residents of Nunavut and the surrounding Arctic region. This program accepted one intake of students in 2001-02 who graduated in 2004-05. The Akitsiraq I final report Lawyer Making in the Arctic ( [July 2007] Browne, Crawford and Tulloch), is an extensive record of this program, and includes seven appendices incorporating contracts, course selections, timetables, budgets and program evaluation by graduates.

The Akitsiraq II program has been announced by the parent society in conjunction with the University of Ottawa Law Faculty, using infrastructure and support from Nunavut Arctic College. The announced intention is to proceed with a second cohort of students in 2011. The recruiting and admission process for the 2011 cohort have been funded by Justice Canada, including Akitsiraq Law Days in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet, Iqaluit and Ottawa in the spring of 2010, but the program launch has been on hold since November 2009 awaiting a decision by the Government of Nunavut to provide core support.

The Akitsiraq Law School Society is a not-for-profit organization incorporated in Nunavut. Its Board of Directors and membership are drawn from the Nunavut judiciary, legal profession and supporting members of the public, along with nominees of supporting agencies.

The cohort-based, culture-enhancing, learning-in-Nunavut format of the Akitsiraq Law Program has frequently been promoted as a prototype for training in other professions including accounting "The Akitsiraq of Accounting", education administration "MEd. Graduates Set a Good Example", and for doctors and engineers.
Logo Queen University

Queen University

Kingston

Queen's University at Kingston (commonly shortened to Queen's University or Queen's) is a public research university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Founded on 16 October 1841 via a royal charter issued by Queen Victoria, the university predates the founding of Canada by 26 years. Queen's holds more than 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of land throughout Ontario and owns Herstmonceux Castle in East Sussex, England. Queen's is organized into ten undergraduate, graduate and professional faculties and schools.

The Church of Scotland established Queen's College in 1841 with a royal charter from Queen Victoria. The first classes, intended to prepare students for the ministry, were held 7 March 1842 with 13 students and two professors. Queen's was the first university west of the maritime provinces to admit women, and to form a student government. In 1883, a women's college for medical education affiliated with Queen's University was established. In 1888, Queen's University began offering extension courses, becoming the first Canadian university to do so. In 1912, Queen's secularized and changed to its present legal name.

Queen's is a co-educational university, with more than 23,000 students, and with over 131,000 living alumni worldwide. Notable alumni include government officials, academics, business leaders and 56 Rhodes Scholars. The university was ranked 4th in Canada by Maclean's University Ranking Guide for 2015, 206th in the 2015-2016 QS World University Rankings, 251-300th in the 2015-2016 Times Higher Education World University Rankings, and 201-300 in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities. Queen's varsity teams, known as the Golden Gaels, compete in the Ontario University Athletics conference of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport.
Logo University of Victoria

University of Victoria

VictoriaArchitectureLawEarth Science

The University of Victoria (UVic or Victoria) is a public research university located in Saanich and Oak Bay within Greater Victoria, 5.71 km northeast of downtown Victoria, British Columbia. It was founded as Victoria College in 1903 and affiliated with McGill University, which is also credited with the beginnings of the University of British Columbia. A non-denominational institution, it transitioned to its current status as the University of Victoria in 1963. The university's annual enrollment is about 20,000 students. UVic's campus is known for its innovative architecture, beautiful gardens and mild climate.

Academically, the University of Victoria is noted for its programs in Earth and Ocean Sciences, Fine and Performing Arts, Engineering, and Law along with a strong focus on co-operative education. It is the nation's lead institution in the VENUS and NEPTUNE deep-water seafloor observatory projects.

The Victoria Vikes (more commonly known as the UVic Vikes or simply the Vikes) represent the university in the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) community in a number of competitive sports, as well as through a variety of intercollegiate leagues. The Vikes have especially long and eminent ties to competitive rowing and basketball.

Victoria ranks well in global rankings. In 2014-2015, Times Higher Education World University Rankings ranked UVic 173 in the world, and at seventh place in Canada. It ranked first in Canada in the Times Higher Education’s ranking of schools under 50 years old. UVic was the top-ranked university in Canada without an autonomous medical school in the THE rankings. The university has also been home to more than 40 faculty members who are Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada since it was founded.
Logo University of Saskatchewan

University of Saskatchewan

SaskatoonTheology, ReligionUrban StudiesAgriculture, Fisheries, FoodCultural StudiesInfectious, Tropical Diseases

The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) is a Canadian public research university, founded in 1907, and located on the east side of the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. An "Act to establish and incorporate a University for the Province of Saskatchewan" was passed by the provincial legislature in 1907. It established the provincial university on April 3, 1907 "for the purpose of providing facilities for higher education in all its branches and enabling all persons without regard to race, creed or religion to take the fullest advantage". The University of Saskatchewan is the largest education institution in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. It is also the only Canadian University that has a partnership agreement with University of Oxford. The University of Saskatchewan is one of Canada’s top research universities (based on the number of Canada Research Chairs) and is a member of the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities (the 15 most research-intensive universities in Canada).

The university began as an agricultural college in 1907 and established the first Canadian university-based department of extension in 1910. 300 acres (121 ha) were set aside for university buildings and 1,000 acres (405 ha) for the U of S farm, and agricultural fields. In total 10.32 km2 (3.985 sq mi) was annexed for the university. The main University campus is situated upon 2,425 acres (981 ha), with another 500 acres (202 ha) allocated for Innovation Place Research Park. The University of Saskatchewan agriculture college still has access to neighbouring urban research lands. The University of Saskatchewan's Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) facility, (2003) develops DNA-enhanced immunization vaccines for both humans and animals. The University is also home to the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron, which is considered one of the largest and most innovative investments in Canadian science. Since its origins as an agricultural college, research has played an important role at the university. Discoveries made at the U of S include sulphate-resistant cement and the cobalt-60 cancer therapy unit. The university offers over 200 academic programs. Duncan P. McColl was appointed as the first registrar, establishing the first convocation from which Chief Justice Edward L. Wetmore was elected as the first chancellor. Walter Charles Murray became the first president of the university's board of governors.
Logo Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Kwantlen Polytechnic University (commonly abbreviated to KPU) is a public degree-granting undergraduate polytechnic university in British Columbia with campuses located in Surrey, Richmond, Cloverdale, and Langley. KPU is one of the largest institutions by enrolment in British Columbia with a total of 20,000 students and 1,600 faculty members across its four locations encompassing the Metro Vancouver disctrict. KPU operates as the only polytechnic university in Canada and provides undergraduate education including bachelor's degrees, associate degrees, diplomas, certificates and citations in more than 200 diverse programs.

Prior to being granted authority as a University college, Kwantlen Polytechnic University was founded as Kwantlen College. In 2008, the provincial government announced its intention to amend the University Act to appoint Kwantlen University College a polytechnic university. The legislation renaming the University College to University received royal assent on May 29, 2008 and KPU began operation as Kwantlen Polytechnic University on September 1, 2008.

KPU became a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) on October 24, 2008. Also in affiliation with KPU include: the International Association of Universities (IAU), the Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan), the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU), the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE), and the Canadian University Press (CUP).

The Globe and Mail Canadian University Report ranked KPU among the top post-secondary institution relative to enrollment across Canada, earning numerous grades in the "A to B Range" in categories such as quality of teaching and learning, career preparation, student satisfaction and information technology. Published in Maclean's magazine, the National Survey of Student Engagement also listed KPU among the top Canadian institutions relative to student participation, educational practices, and quality of education.
Logo Dalhousie University

Dalhousie University

Halifax

Dalhousie University (commonly known as Dalhousie or Dal) is a public research university in Nova Scotia, Canada, with three campuses in Halifax, and a fourth in Bible Hill. Dalhousie offers more than 4,000 courses and 180 degree programs in twelve undergraduate, graduate, and professional faculties. The university is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada.

Dalhousie was established as a nonsectarian college in 1818 by the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia, George Ramsay, 9th Earl of Dalhousie, after whom the university was named. The college did not hold its first class until 1838, until then operating sporadically due to financial difficulties. It reopened for a third time in 1863 following a reorganization which brought a change of name to "The Governors of Dalhousie College and University". The university formally changed its name to "Dalhousie University" in 1997 through provincial legislation, the same legislation which had merged the institution with the Technical University of Nova Scotia.

The Dalhousie library system currently operates the largest library in Atlantic Canada, as well as holds the largest collection of agricultural resource material in the region. The university operates a total of fourteen residences. There are currently two student unions that represent student interests at the university, the Dalhousie Student Union, and the Dalhousie Association for Graduate Students. Dalhousie's varsity teams, the Tigers, compete in the Atlantic University Sport conference of Canadian Interuniversity Sport. Dalhousie’s Faculty of Agriculture varsity teams are the Dalhousie Rams, and compete in the ACAA and CCAA.

Dalhousie is a coeducational university with more than 18,000 students and over 110,000 alumni. Notable alumni include government officials, academics, business leaders and 89 Rhodes Scholars. The university ranked 235th in the 2014 QS World University Rankings, 226-250th in the 2014-2015 Times Higher Education World University Rankings, and 201–300th in the 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities. Dalhousie is a centre for marine research, and is host to the headquarters of the Ocean Tracking Network.
Logo University of Toronto Scarborough

University of Toronto Scarborough

TorontoUrban StudiesBusinessManagementNeurosciences, Neurology

The University of Toronto Scarborough (also known as U of T Scarborough or UTSC) is a satellite campus of the University of Toronto. Based in the Scarborough district of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the campus is set upon suburban parkland in the residential neighbourhood of Highland Creek. It was established in 1964 as Scarborough College, a constituent college of the Faculty of Arts and Science. The college expanded into a mid-sized university following its designation as an autonomic division of the university in 1972.

Academics of the campus are centered on a variety of undergraduate studies in the disciplines of management, arts and sciences, whilst also hosting limited postgraduate research programs. Its neuroscience program was the first to be offered in the nation. The campus is noted for being the university's sole provider of cooperative education programs, as well as the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Through affiliation with the adjacent Centennial Science and Technology Centre, it also offers enrolment in joint programs.

The campus has traditionally held the annual F. B. Watts Memorial Lectures, which has hosted several internationally renowned scholars, since 1970. Its nuclear magnetic resonance laboratory was the first of its kind in Canada, allowing the campus to conduct influential research in the environmental sciences. The original building of the campus was internationally acclaimed for its architectural design. The Dan Lang Field, home to the baseball team of the Toronto Varsity Blues, is also situated at the campus.
Logo University of Winnipeg

University of Winnipeg

WinnipegBusinessEconomics

The University of Winnipeg (UWinnipeg) is a public university in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada that offers undergraduate faculties of art, business and economics, education, science and kinesiology and applied health as well as graduate programs. UWinnipeg's founding colleges were Manitoba College and Wesley College, which merged to form United College in 1938. The University of Winnipeg was established in 1967 when United College received its charter. The governance was modeled on the provincial University of Toronto Act of 1906 which established a bicameral system of university government consisting of a senate (faculty), responsible for academic policy, and a board of governors (citizens) exercising exclusive control over financial policy and having formal authority in all other matters. The president, appointed by the board, was a link between the bodies to perform institutional leadership.

UWinnipeg's current President and Vice-Chancellor is Dr. Annette Trimbee (August 2014), succeeding Dr. Lloyd Axworthy who served from 2004 to 2014.

Maclean's magazine and the Globe and Mail newspaper consistently rank the university in the top fifteen of all Canadian universities whose primary focus is undergraduate education in the category of student satisfaction. In 2013 the U of W ranked 13th out of 19 primarily undergraduate institutions.

The U of W was the first university in Canada to ban the sale of plastic bottled water on campus.

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