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Logo University of Maryland, College Park

University of Maryland, College Park

College Park

The University of Maryland, College Park (often referred to as The University of Maryland, Maryland, UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public research university located in the city of College Park in Prince George's County, Maryland, approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) from the northeast border of Washington, D.C. Founded in 1856, the University of Maryland is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland. With a fall 2010 enrollment of more than 37,000 students, over 100 undergraduate majors, and 120 graduate programs, Maryland is the largest university in the state and the largest in the Washington Metropolitan Area. It is a member of the Association of American Universities and competes athletically as a member of the Big Ten Conference.

The University of Maryland's proximity to the nation's capital has resulted in strong research partnerships with the Federal government. Many members of the faculty receive research funding and institutional support from agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Department of Homeland Security.

The operating budget of the University of Maryland during the 2009 fiscal year was projected to be approximately US$1.531 billion. For the same fiscal year, the University of Maryland received a total of $518 million in research funding, surpassing its 2008 mark by $118 million. As of May 11, 2012, the university's "Great Expectations" campaign had exceeded $950 million in private donations.
Logo George Washington University

George Washington University

Washington

The George Washington University (GW, GWU, or George Washington) is a private, coeducational research university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. with two other campuses including the Mount Vernon campus in the Foxhall neighborhood, as well as the Virginia Science & Technology campus in Loudoun County, Virginia. GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia.

President George Washington had indicated to Congress through various letters, as well as his last will and testament, that he wanted to establish a university within the nation's capital. Washington left fifty shares of the Potowmack Company in his estate for a national university in the District of Columbia. However, due to the company's financial status, the university never received the shares. The university was chartered by an Act of Congress on February 9, 1821, as the Columbian College in the District of Columbia. In 1904, it changed its name to the George Washington University in honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

The university awards undergraduate and graduate degrees in several disciplines through all of its ten different schools. GWU's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, Elliott School of International Affairs, Milken Institute School of Public Health, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Nursing offer undergraduate and graduate degrees. The university also has specialized schools within colleges such as the School of Media and Public Affairs and the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design.

George Washington is consistently ranked by The Princeton Review in the top "Most Politically Active" Schools. Many of the university's graduates have gone on to high positions within both the United States Government and in foreign governments. Notable alumni include US Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, former First-Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. There are currently four George Washington University alumni serving in the United States Senate, nine serving in the United States House of Representatives, and ten serving as United States ambassadors.

The school colors are buff and blue, and the sports teams and current and former students in general are called "Colonials".
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Catholic University of America

Catholic University of America

Washington

The Catholic University of America (CUA) is a private university located in Washington, D.C. in the United States. It is a pontifical university of the Catholic Church in the United States and the only institution of higher education founded by the U.S. Catholic bishops. Established in 1887 as a graduate and research center following approval by Pope Leo XIII on Easter Sunday, the university began offering undergraduate education in 1904. The university's campus lies within the Brookland neighborhood, known as "Little Rome", which contains 60 Catholic institutions, including Trinity Washington University and the Dominican House of Studies.

It has been ranked as one of the nation's best colleges by the Princeton Review, one of the best values of any private school in the country by Kiplinger's, "one of the most eco-friendly universities in the country," was awarded the "highest federal recognition an institution can receive" for community service, and has been recommended by the Cardinal Newman Society in The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College. It was described as one of the 25 most underrated colleges in the United States.

CUA's programs emphasize the liberal arts, professional education, and personal development. The school stays closely connected with the Catholic Church and Catholic organizations. The American Cardinals Dinner is put on by the residential U.S. cardinals each year to raise scholarship funds for CUA. The university has a long history of working with the Knights of Columbus; the university's law school and basilica have dedications to the involvement and support of the Knights.

The university has been visited three times by sitting popes. Pope John Paul II visited on October 7, 1979. On April 16, 2008, Pope Benedict XVI gave an address at the campus about Catholic education and academic freedom. Pope Francis visited on September 23, 2015 during his trip to the United States, where he said mass on the east portico of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo American University School of International Service

American University School of International Service

WashingtonCommunicationEcology, Evolution, Environment

The School of International Service (SIS) is American University's school of advanced international study in the areas of international politics, international communication, international development, international economic relations, peace and conflict resolution, global environmental politics, and U.S. foreign policy.

The School of International Service was created when AU's Hurst Anderson was urged by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to create a school of practitioners prepared for foreign policy beyond the U.S.–Soviet rivalry. Since 1957, SIS has prepared thousands of graduates to represent their country in the global arena by "waging peace" and employing the hallmarks of thoughtful diplomacy.

SIS is the largest school of international relations in the United States, enrolling more than 2,000 students from over 150 countries. The school makes extensive use of the academic and governmental resources offered by the university's location in Washington, D.C.

Foreign Policy, in its 2015 rankings of top international affairs programs, ranked the school's master's and undergraduate programs as 8th- and 9th-best in the world, respectively. SIS is also consistently ranked in conjunction with American University's School of Public Affairs as a leading program in the country by U.S. News & World Report's college and university rankings. SIS is also a full member of The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

WashingtonBusiness

The Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (commonly abbreviated SFS) is a school of international affairs within Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., United States. Currently ranked amongst the top foreign service schools, it stands first in the world at the graduate level. Jesuit priest Edmund A. Walsh founded the School of Foreign Service in 1919, recognizing the need for a school that would prepare Americans for roles as diplomats and business professionals in the wake of the U.S.' expanding involvement in the world after World War I. The school predates the U.S. Foreign Service by six years.

Today, SFS hosts a student body of approximately 2,100 from 80 nations each year. It offers an undergraduate program based in the liberal arts, which leads to the Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service degree, as well as eight interdisciplinary graduate programs. Its faculty include many distinguished figures in international affairs, such as former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, former U.S. Director of Central Intelligence George Tenet, former President of Poland Aleksander Kwaśniewski, and former Prime Minister of Spain José María Aznar.

The School of Foreign Service is widely recognized as one of the world's leading international affairs schools and is sometimes referred to as the "West Point of the U.S. diplomatic corps." In 2007, the Carnegie Endowment's Foreign Policy magazine ranked the school's undergraduate program third in the nation and its master's programs first in the nation. Famous alumni include former U.S. President Bill Clinton, former Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, King Abdullah of Jordan, John Cardinal O’Connor, and Željko Komšić, Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, among others.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo American University

American University

WashingtonLaw Political Science

American University (AU or American) is a private research university in Washington, D.C., United States, affiliated with the United Methodist Church, although the university's curriculum is secular. The university was chartered by an Act of Congress on February 24, 1893 as "The American University," when the bill was approved by President Benjamin Harrison. Roughly 7,200 undergraduate students and 5,230 graduate students are currently enrolled. AU is a member of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. A member of the Division I Patriot League, its sports teams compete as the American University Eagles.

AU was named the most politically active school in the nation in The Princeton Review's annual survey of college students in 2008, 2010, and 2012. American University is especially known for promoting international understanding reflected in the diverse student body from more than 150 countries, the university’s course offerings, the faculty's research, and from the regular presence of world leaders on its campus. The university has six schools, including the well-regarded School of International Service (SIS), currently ranked 8th in the world for its graduate programs and 9th in the world for its undergraduate program in International Affairs by Foreign Policy, and the Washington College of Law.
Logo School of Nursing and Health Studies, Georgetown University

School of Nursing and Health Studies, Georgetown University

WashingtonNursingLawHealth Care Sciences, ServicesMedicine, General, InternalInstruments, InstrumentationBiology, Biochemistry, Biotechnology

Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies (NHS) is one of the four undergraduate schools of Georgetown University. Founded in 1903 as the School of Nursing, it added three other health related majors in 1999 and appended its name to become the School of Nursing & Health Studies. The school has been at the forefront of education in the health care field, offering many programs unique to America's elite institutions. Offering undergraduate and graduate programs in the health sciences, graduates are prepared to enter the complex fields of medicine, law, health policy, and nursing. NHS is made up of the Department of Health Systems Administration, the Department of Human Science, the Department of International Health, and the Department of Nursing.

The Department of Human Science completed the Discovery Center in 2006. The Discovery Center includes a Basic Health Science Teaching Laboratory, a Molecular and Cell Biology Research Laboratory, a Cell Culture Room, a Preparation and Instrument Room, and a Zeiss Axiovert 200 microscope.

In 2011, the Department of Nursing launched an online nursing initiative at the graduate level. The online initiative builds upon Georgetown’s on-campus graduate nursing program and is the university's first-ever online degree-granting program.

NHS is home to GUS - Georgetown University Simulator - a full-body, robotic mannequin that can realistically replicate physiological conditions and symptoms and pharmacological responses. The simulator is within the O'Neill Family Foundation Clinical Simulation Center, which includes adult patient simulators, a pediatric patient simulator, five primary care offices, and two hospital units. The Simulation Center is used extensively for clinical education by undergraduate and graduate level nursing programs, as well as by undergraduates in the Department of Human Science.

Several graduate programs within NHS were ranked in the 2012 "America's Best Graduate Schools" edition of U.S. News & World Report. The Nurse Anesthesia Program was ranked 17th, the Healthcare Management Program was ranked 29th, the Nurse Midwifery Program was ranked 19th, and the nursing graduate program was ranked 36th. The school also has an active research program.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo American University School of Communication

American University School of Communication

WashingtonCommunicationElectrical, ElectronicTelecommunication, MultimediaEconomicsPolitical ScienceFilm, Radio, TelevisionLanguages, Philology, Linguistic Studies

The School of Communication at American University is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. The school offers five undergraduate majors: communication studies, print/broadcast journalism, public communication, visual media, and foreign language and communication media (jointly administered with the College of Arts and Sciences). Interdisciplinary degrees in communication, legal institutions, economics, and government (CLEG, which is housed in the School of Public Affairs), and multimedia design and development (which is housed in the College of Arts and Sciences). The school offers several advanced degrees: Master of Arts (M.A.) in Media Entrepreneurship, Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Film and Electronic Media, M.A. in Film & Video, M.A. in Game Design (offered jointly with the College of Arts and Sciences), M.A. in Producing for Film & Video, M.A. in Journalism & Public Affairs (Print/Broadcast/Interactive), M.A. in Strategic Communication, M.A. in Political Communication (offered jointly with the American University School of Public Affairs), M.A. in International Media (offered jointly with the American University School of International Service), and a 3-year Ph.D program in Communication Studies.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Catholic University of America

Catholic University of America

Washington

The Catholic University of America (CUA) is a private university located in Washington, D.C. in the United States. It is a pontifical university of the Catholic Church in the United States and the only institution of higher education founded by the U.S. Catholic bishops. Established in 1887 as a graduate and research center following approval by Pope Leo XIII on Easter Sunday, the university began offering undergraduate education in 1904. The university's campus lies within the Brookland neighborhood, known as "Little Rome", which contains 60 Catholic institutions, including Trinity Washington University and the Dominican House of Studies.

It has been ranked as one of the nation's best colleges by the Princeton Review, one of the best values of any private school in the country by Kiplinger's, "one of the most eco-friendly universities in the country," was awarded the "highest federal recognition an institution can receive" for community service, and has been recommended by the Cardinal Newman Society in The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College. It was described as one of the 25 most underrated colleges in the United States.

CUA's programs emphasize the liberal arts, professional education, and personal development. The school stays closely connected with the Catholic Church and Catholic organizations. The American Cardinals Dinner is put on by the residential U.S. cardinals each year to raise scholarship funds for CUA. The university has a long history of working with the Knights of Columbus; the university's law school and basilica have dedications to the involvement and support of the Knights.

The university has been visited three times by sitting popes. Pope John Paul II visited on October 7, 1979. On April 16, 2008, Pope Benedict XVI gave an address at the campus about Catholic education and academic freedom. Pope Francis visited on September 23, 2015 during his trip to the United States, where he said mass on the east portico of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.
Logo Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University

BaltimoreMathematics, Statistics, Finance History Physics Business Nursing

The Johns Hopkins University (commonly referred to as Johns Hopkins, JHU, or simply Hopkins) is a private research university in Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1876, the university was named after its first benefactor, the American entrepreneur, abolitionist, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. His $7 million bequest—of which half financed the establishment of The Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States at the time. Daniel Coit Gilman, who was inaugurated as the institution's first president on February 22, 1876, led the university to revolutionize higher education in the U.S. by integrating teaching and research.

Johns Hopkins is organized into ten divisions on campuses in Maryland and Washington, D.C. with international centers in Italy, China, and Singapore. The two undergraduate divisions, the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the Whiting School of Engineering, are located on the Homewood campus in Baltimore's Charles Village neighborhood. The medical school, the nursing school, and the Bloomberg School of Public Health are located on the Medical Institutions campus in East Baltimore. The university also consists of the Peabody Institute, the Applied Physics Laboratory, the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the education school, the Carey Business School, and various other facilities.

The first research university in the United States and a founding member of the American Association of Universities, Johns Hopkins has been considered one of the world’s top universities throughout its history. The University stands among the top 10 in US News' Best National Universities Rankings and top 20 on a number of international league tables. Over the course of almost 140 years, thirty-six Nobel laureates and a United States president have been affiliated with Johns Hopkins. Founded in 1883, the Blue Jays men’s lacrosse team has captured 44 national titles and joined the Big Ten Conference as an affiliate member in 2014.
Logo George Washington University

George Washington University

Washington

The George Washington University (GW, GWU, or George Washington) is a private, coeducational research university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. with two other campuses including the Mount Vernon campus in the Foxhall neighborhood, as well as the Virginia Science & Technology campus in Loudoun County, Virginia. GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia.

President George Washington had indicated to Congress through various letters, as well as his last will and testament, that he wanted to establish a university within the nation's capital. Washington left fifty shares of the Potowmack Company in his estate for a national university in the District of Columbia. However, due to the company's financial status, the university never received the shares. The university was chartered by an Act of Congress on February 9, 1821, as the Columbian College in the District of Columbia. In 1904, it changed its name to the George Washington University in honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

The university awards undergraduate and graduate degrees in several disciplines through all of its ten different schools. GWU's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, Elliott School of International Affairs, Milken Institute School of Public Health, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Nursing offer undergraduate and graduate degrees. The university also has specialized schools within colleges such as the School of Media and Public Affairs and the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design.

George Washington is consistently ranked by The Princeton Review in the top "Most Politically Active" Schools. Many of the university's graduates have gone on to high positions within both the United States Government and in foreign governments. Notable alumni include US Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, former First-Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. There are currently four George Washington University alumni serving in the United States Senate, nine serving in the United States House of Representatives, and ten serving as United States ambassadors.

The school colors are buff and blue, and the sports teams and current and former students in general are called "Colonials".
Logo School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University

School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University

WashingtonBusinessEthnic, Family StudiesMedicine, General, InternalLaw

Established in July 1997, and renamed in March 2014, the Milken Institute School of Public Health brought together three longstanding university programs in the schools of medicine, business, and education that have since expanded substantially. Today, more than 900 students from nearly every U.S. state and more than 35 nations pursue undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral-level degrees in public health. Its student body is one of the most ethnically diverse among the nation's private schools of public health.

The School also offers an array of joint degree programs, allowing students to couple a law degree with the Master of Public Health (MPH), or to combine an MPH with a medical degree or an MA in International Affairs. An MPH/Physician Assistant program, the first in the world, is available at the Milken Institute SPH, as is the opportunity to serve as a Peace Corps volunteer while pursuing an MPH.

The public health programs of the Milken Institute SPH have full accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health. The program in health services administration is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education. The Athletic Training Education Program is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. The Milken Institute SPH is a member of the Association of Schools of Public Health.

Within the departments, sixteen specialist centers, institutes and special programs are sites for state-of-the-art research and training across the many disciplines of public health. The School's current research portfolio is approximately eighteen million dollars.
Logo George Washington University

George Washington University

Washington

The George Washington University (GW, GWU, or George Washington) is a private, coeducational research university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. with two other campuses including the Mount Vernon campus in the Foxhall neighborhood, as well as the Virginia Science & Technology campus in Loudoun County, Virginia. GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia.

President George Washington had indicated to Congress through various letters, as well as his last will and testament, that he wanted to establish a university within the nation's capital. Washington left fifty shares of the Potowmack Company in his estate for a national university in the District of Columbia. However, due to the company's financial status, the university never received the shares. The university was chartered by an Act of Congress on February 9, 1821, as the Columbian College in the District of Columbia. In 1904, it changed its name to the George Washington University in honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

The university awards undergraduate and graduate degrees in several disciplines through all of its ten different schools. GWU's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, Elliott School of International Affairs, Milken Institute School of Public Health, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Nursing offer undergraduate and graduate degrees. The university also has specialized schools within colleges such as the School of Media and Public Affairs and the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design.

George Washington is consistently ranked by The Princeton Review in the top "Most Politically Active" Schools. Many of the university's graduates have gone on to high positions within both the United States Government and in foreign governments. Notable alumni include US Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, former First-Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. There are currently four George Washington University alumni serving in the United States Senate, nine serving in the United States House of Representatives, and ten serving as United States ambassadors.

The school colors are buff and blue, and the sports teams and current and former students in general are called "Colonials".
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo School of Continuing Studies, Georgetown University

School of Continuing Studies, Georgetown University

WashingtonCommunicationHuman Resources, Social WorkManagementUrban Studies

The Georgetown University School of Continuing Studies (SCS) is a school at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., United States. SCS provides a Georgetown education to students at every stage of learning, including high school programs, summer school programs for college students, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degree programs, certificate programs for professionals. Founded as the School of Summer and Continuing Education in 1956, it graduated its first students in 1975. Today SCS enrolls more than 5,000 students annually in all of its programs.

The school specializes in Master of Professional Studies (MPS) degree programs in Emergency & Disaster Management; Global Strategic Communications; Hospitality Management; Human Resources Management; Integrated Marketing Communications; Journalism; Program & Portfolio Management; Project Management; Public Relations & Corporate Communications; Real Estate; Sports Industry Management; Systems Engineering;Technology management; and Urban & Regional Planning.

The school also offers a Bachelor or Arts in Liberal Studies, a Master of Arts in Liberal Studies, and a Doctorate in Liberal Studies, the first known doctorate of its kind in the world. Another branch of SCS is the Georgetown University Center for Continuing and Professional Education (CCPE), which offers certificate programs in paralegal studies, financial planning, project management, executive leadership, organizational development, and other areas related to professional advancement. CCPE also engages corporate and government entities to customize educational offerings to fit specific needs of organizations.

Courses are offered at the Georgetown University main campus and the metro-accessible downtown campus in the heart of Washington, DC.
Logo Georgetown University

Georgetown University

WashingtonLaw

Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill and Georgetown has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar.

Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized earlier efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that had been thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave by law. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities.

Comprising 9 undergraduate and graduate schools, the university has about 7,000 undergraduate and over 10,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including 130 foreign countries. The university's most notable alumni are prominent in public life in the United States and abroad. Among them are former U.S. President Bill Clinton, U.S. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, dozens of U.S. governors and members of Congress, heads of state or government of more than a dozen countries, royalty and diplomats.

Campus organizations include the country's largest student-run business and largest student-run financial institution. Georgetown's athletic teams, nicknamed the Hoyas, include a men's basketball team that has won a record-tying seven Big East championships, appeared in five Final Fours, and won a national championship in 1984.
Logo Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

WashingtonInternational Relations

The Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University (GWU) is a professional school of international relations founded in 1898 as the School of Comparative Jurisprudence and Diplomacy. It is located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the capital city of the United States, at the university's Foggy Bottom campus.

As a leading professional school of international affairs, the Elliott School offers undergraduate and graduate degrees with majors covering a range of global issues and world regions. It is a full member of The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs, a grouping of the world's foremost academic institutions in the field of international relations.

The school is located opposite to the U.S. State Department's headquarters, the Harry S Truman Building. Additionally, it is blocks from the International Monetary Fund (which is on GWU's campus), the World Bank, and the White House. More than 2,100 undergraduates and 750 graduate students attend the Elliott School, making it the largest school of international affairs in the United States.

Ambassador Reuben E. Brigety II , former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs and ambassador to the African Union, serves as the Dean of the Elliott School, formally assuming the position in October 2015. His predecessor, Michael E. Brown had served as the Dean since June 2005. Brown, who founded and directed the Center for Peace and Security Studies at Georgetown University, has a background in international security, conflict and conflict resolution, and U.S. foreign and defense policy.
Logo George Washington University

George Washington University

Washington

The George Washington University (GW, GWU, or George Washington) is a private, coeducational research university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. with two other campuses including the Mount Vernon campus in the Foxhall neighborhood, as well as the Virginia Science & Technology campus in Loudoun County, Virginia. GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia.

President George Washington had indicated to Congress through various letters, as well as his last will and testament, that he wanted to establish a university within the nation's capital. Washington left fifty shares of the Potowmack Company in his estate for a national university in the District of Columbia. However, due to the company's financial status, the university never received the shares. The university was chartered by an Act of Congress on February 9, 1821, as the Columbian College in the District of Columbia. In 1904, it changed its name to the George Washington University in honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

The university awards undergraduate and graduate degrees in several disciplines through all of its ten different schools. GWU's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, Elliott School of International Affairs, Milken Institute School of Public Health, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Nursing offer undergraduate and graduate degrees. The university also has specialized schools within colleges such as the School of Media and Public Affairs and the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design.

George Washington is consistently ranked by The Princeton Review in the top "Most Politically Active" Schools. Many of the university's graduates have gone on to high positions within both the United States Government and in foreign governments. Notable alumni include US Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, former First-Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. There are currently four George Washington University alumni serving in the United States Senate, nine serving in the United States House of Representatives, and ten serving as United States ambassadors.

The school colors are buff and blue, and the sports teams and current and former students in general are called "Colonials".
Logo University of Northern Virginia

University of Northern Virginia

Annandale

The University of Northern Virginia or UNVA was a unaccredited for-profit private undergraduate and graduate university in Annandale, Virginia. Founded in 1998, the university offers bachelors, Masters and doctoral degrees. Although UNVA is not well known within the United States, it calls itself the most popular American university for students from India.

UNVA has received government scrutiny and media coverage for its academic and immigration practices. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents raided UNVA offices and informed school officials on July 28, 2011, that the government was ending UNVA's authorization to admit foreign students. Kapil Sibal, a minister in India's current cabinet, compared UNVA to a "sham university," stating UNVA does not have acceptable accreditation. Although media sources in India speculated that UNVA would close permanently in 2011, the university remained open and moved to South Dakota in 2013 when the Commonwealth of Virginia revoked its license to operate in that state. On October 1, 2013, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement ended UNVA's authorization to admit foreign students.

In October 2013, UNVA announced its move to Sioux Falls, South Dakota. At its new location, UNVA is facing scrutiny as well. UNVA is investigated by the South Dakota Attorney General's office, and its office suite sits empty. As of March 6, 2014, UNVA has removed the references to their new location in South Dakota from their website.

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