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Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistoryCommunication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo University of Toronto Scarborough

University of Toronto Scarborough

TorontoUrban StudiesBusinessManagementNeurosciences, Neurology

The University of Toronto Scarborough (also known as U of T Scarborough or UTSC) is a satellite campus of the University of Toronto. Based in the Scarborough district of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the campus is set upon suburban parkland in the residential neighbourhood of Highland Creek. It was established in 1964 as Scarborough College, a constituent college of the Faculty of Arts and Science. The college expanded into a mid-sized university following its designation as an autonomic division of the university in 1972.

Academics of the campus are centered on a variety of undergraduate studies in the disciplines of management, arts and sciences, whilst also hosting limited postgraduate research programs. Its neuroscience program was the first to be offered in the nation. The campus is noted for being the university's sole provider of cooperative education programs, as well as the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Through affiliation with the adjacent Centennial Science and Technology Centre, it also offers enrolment in joint programs.

The campus has traditionally held the annual F. B. Watts Memorial Lectures, which has hosted several internationally renowned scholars, since 1970. Its nuclear magnetic resonance laboratory was the first of its kind in Canada, allowing the campus to conduct influential research in the environmental sciences. The original building of the campus was internationally acclaimed for its architectural design. The Dan Lang Field, home to the baseball team of the Toronto Varsity Blues, is also situated at the campus.
Logo York University

York University

TorontoBusiness Law Ecology, Evolution, Environment

York University (French: Université York) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is Canada's third-largest university.

York University has approximately 55,000 students, 7,000 faculty and staff, and 275,000 alumni worldwide. It has eleven faculties, namely the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Faculty of Science, Lassonde School of Engineering, Schulich School of Business, Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon College, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Health, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design (formerly the Faculty of Fine Arts), and 28 research centres.

York University participates in the Canadian Space Program and is home to Canada's only Space engineering program. The Faculty of Science and Lassonde School of Engineering are Canada's primary research facility into Martian exploration, and have designed several space research instruments and applications currently used by NASA. York has pioneered several PhD programs in Canada, including women's studies. The School of Social Work is recognized as having one of the most socially responsive programs in the country. York's psychology program is the largest in North America. York University's business school and law school have continuously and consistently been ranked among the top schools in Canada and the world.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto

Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto

Toronto

The Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto (U of T) is one of Canada's largest and most prestigious arts and science teaching and research institutions. With almost 22,000 undergraduate and 3,000 graduate students, Arts and Science represents over half the student population on the downtown campus. Overall, 73 per cent of the university's undergraduates and one third of graduates pursue degrees in the humanities, social sciences and sciences. It is home to 800 professors who teach some 2,000 courses arranged in 300 undergraduate and 70 graduate programs hosted by 29 departments, 16 centres and institutes, and seven colleges. Along with a dedicated administrative and technical staff of more than 400, the Faculty is among the most comprehensive in North America. The faculty's Department of Economics has been placed 23rd (1995–99) and 18th (2004–08) by the world rankings and is the strongest Economics faculty in Canada. The Department of Philosophy ranked 15th overall in the English-speaking world and 1st in Canada in the Philosophical Gourmet Report. The Department of Sociology ranks among the top 10 in North America. In the 2010 Academic Ranking of World Universities, the Department of Computer Science placed first overall in Canada, and ranked 10th worldwide.

For the 2012-2013 entrance year, Arts had an entry average of 86.6% and Science had an entry average of 88.8%. Commerce had an entry average of 91.7%. For professional and graduate studies, admission is competitive. For 2011-2012, programs such as public policy and global affairs accept about one-tenth of applicants, though they do not have standardized admissions test requirements. Doctoral-stream master's programs had an acceptance rate of 29.6%, while doctoral programs admitted 21.5% of applicants.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

TorontoManagementBusinessMathematics, Statistics, FinanceLawEcology, Evolution, Environment

The Joseph L. Rotman School of Management commonly known as the Rotman School of Management, the Rotman School or just Rotman, is the University of Toronto's graduate business school, located in Downtown Toronto. The University of Toronto has been offering undergraduate courses in commerce and management since 1901, but the school was formally established in 1950 as the Institute of Business Administration, which was then changed to the Faculty of Management Studies in 1972 and subsequently shortened to the Faculty of Management in 1986. The school was renamed in 1997 after the late Joseph L. Rotman (1935-2015), its principal benefactor.

The school offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs in business administration, finance and commerce, including full-time, part-time and executive MBA programs along with a Master of Finance program and a doctoral program, the Rotman PhD. Additionally, in collaboration with other schools at the university, it offers combined MBA degrees with the Faculty of Law (JD/MBA), the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (Skoll BASc/MBA), and the Munk School of Global Affairs (MBA/MGA); and Collaborative Programs in Asia-Pacific Studies and Environmental Studies.

The faculty, 72 per cent of which is international, is currently ranked 9th in the world by the Financial Times for its research output. Out of 113 faculty members, 98% have doctorates. Roger Martin, who served as the school's dean from 1998 to 2013, is considered by Business Week as one of the most influential management thinkers in the world. The school has developed a curriculum built around Martin's concepts of Integrative thinking and Business design.

The school publishes the Rotman Magazine.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo Faculty of Communication & Design, Ryerson University

Faculty of Communication & Design, Ryerson University

Waco

The Faculty of Communication & Design is composed of nine schools, offering undergraduate and/or graduate degrees of major study.

Additional graduate programs of study are available in documentary media, journalism, media production, photographic preservation and collections management and professional communications. The faculty also houses the Rogers Communications Centre, which provides an innovative and technical environment to study and research different aspects of media and society.
Logo Glendon College, York University

Glendon College, York University

TorontoLaw

Glendon College (French: Collège universitaire Glendon) is a federated campus of York University in Toronto, Canada. An internationally oriented, bilingual liberal arts college with 84 full-time faculty members and a student population of about 2,700, Glendon is located in midtown Toronto's Lawrence Park neighbourhood. The college was founded as the first permanent establishment of York University when it began academic operation under the mentorship of the University of Toronto in September 1960. Under the York University Act 1959 legislation, York was once an affiliated institution of the University of Toronto, where the first cohort of faculty and students originally utilized the Falconer Hall building (now part of the Faculty of Law) as a temporary home before relocating north of the St. George campus to Glendon Hall — an estate that was willed by E.R. Wood for post-secondary purposes.

In 1962, a landlot grant was offered by the Province of Ontario to build a new campus, which eventually ceased the bilateral partnership between the two institutions. York University became an independent institution, however, Glendon refused to transfer to Keele, as the University of Toronto had no interest in reacquiring or maintaining the donated Wood property. Murray G. Ross OC OOnt and diplomat Escott Reid CC, who mutually proposed a novel plan for the college to educate students for fields in civil service, governance and academia, were appointed president and principal in 1959 and 1965, respectively. In 1966, the college was officially inaugurated by Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson with the objective for Glendon to become a fully bilingual institution. Formally, Glendon is one of York's 11 faculties. It was modelled on Swarthmore College.
Logo York University

York University

TorontoBusiness Law Ecology, Evolution, Environment

York University (French: Université York) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is Canada's third-largest university.

York University has approximately 55,000 students, 7,000 faculty and staff, and 275,000 alumni worldwide. It has eleven faculties, namely the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Faculty of Science, Lassonde School of Engineering, Schulich School of Business, Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon College, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Health, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design (formerly the Faculty of Fine Arts), and 28 research centres.

York University participates in the Canadian Space Program and is home to Canada's only Space engineering program. The Faculty of Science and Lassonde School of Engineering are Canada's primary research facility into Martian exploration, and have designed several space research instruments and applications currently used by NASA. York has pioneered several PhD programs in Canada, including women's studies. The School of Social Work is recognized as having one of the most socially responsive programs in the country. York's psychology program is the largest in North America. York University's business school and law school have continuously and consistently been ranked among the top schools in Canada and the world.
Logo Schulich School of Business

Schulich School of Business

TorontoBusinessMathematics, Statistics, FinanceAudit, AccountingPublic Administration

The Schulich School of Business is York University's business school located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Schulich offers undergraduate and graduate degree and diploma programs in business administration, finance, accounting, business analytics, public administration and international business as well as a number of PhD and executive programs. Originally known as the Faculty of Administrative Studies (FAS), it was renamed in 1995 after Seymour Schulich, a major benefactor who has donated $15 million to the School. Although the Schulich School of Business is a Faculty of York University, it operates under a separate budget. The dean of the School, Dezsö J. Horváth, was first appointed in 1988, making his tenure one of the longest at any business school in the world. The School is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA).

Primarily located at the Seymour Schulich Building on the Keele Campus in Toronto, Ontario, the School also maintains an executive education centre in Toronto's Financial District in downtown Toronto and a satellite campus in Hyderabad, India. The School also operates representative offices in Beijing and Shanghai, China; Mumbai, India; Seoul, South Korea; and Moscow, Russia. Schulich offers undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate business degrees that lead to careers in the private, public and nonprofit sectors, and has more than 25,000 alumni working in approximately 90 countries. Schulich pioneered Canada’s first International MBA (IMBA) and International BBA (iBBA) degrees, as well as North America’s first cross-border executive MBA degree, the Kellogg-Schulich Executive MBA. Schulich’s Executive Education Centre provides executive development programs annually to more than 16,000 executives in Canada and abroad.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.

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