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Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistoryCommunication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo University of Toronto Scarborough

University of Toronto Scarborough

TorontoUrban StudiesBusinessManagementNeurosciences, Neurology

The University of Toronto Scarborough (also known as U of T Scarborough or UTSC) is a satellite campus of the University of Toronto. Based in the Scarborough district of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the campus is set upon suburban parkland in the residential neighbourhood of Highland Creek. It was established in 1964 as Scarborough College, a constituent college of the Faculty of Arts and Science. The college expanded into a mid-sized university following its designation as an autonomic division of the university in 1972.

Academics of the campus are centered on a variety of undergraduate studies in the disciplines of management, arts and sciences, whilst also hosting limited postgraduate research programs. Its neuroscience program was the first to be offered in the nation. The campus is noted for being the university's sole provider of cooperative education programs, as well as the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Through affiliation with the adjacent Centennial Science and Technology Centre, it also offers enrolment in joint programs.

The campus has traditionally held the annual F. B. Watts Memorial Lectures, which has hosted several internationally renowned scholars, since 1970. Its nuclear magnetic resonance laboratory was the first of its kind in Canada, allowing the campus to conduct influential research in the environmental sciences. The original building of the campus was internationally acclaimed for its architectural design. The Dan Lang Field, home to the baseball team of the Toronto Varsity Blues, is also situated at the campus.
Logo York University

York University

TorontoBusiness Law Ecology, Evolution, Environment

York University (French: Université York) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is Canada's third-largest university.

York University has approximately 55,000 students, 7,000 faculty and staff, and 275,000 alumni worldwide. It has eleven faculties, namely the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Faculty of Science, Lassonde School of Engineering, Schulich School of Business, Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon College, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Health, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Graduate Studies, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design (formerly the Faculty of Fine Arts), and 28 research centres.

York University participates in the Canadian Space Program and is home to Canada's only Space engineering program. The Faculty of Science and Lassonde School of Engineering are Canada's primary research facility into Martian exploration, and have designed several space research instruments and applications currently used by NASA. York has pioneered several PhD programs in Canada, including women's studies. The School of Social Work is recognized as having one of the most socially responsive programs in the country. York's psychology program is the largest in North America. York University's business school and law school have continuously and consistently been ranked among the top schools in Canada and the world.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo University of Toronto

University of Toronto

TorontoHistory Communication

The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses located in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities located outside the United States.

The Varsity Blues are the athletic teams representing the university in intercollegiate league matches, with particularly long and storied ties to gridiron football and ice hockey. The university's Hart House is an early example of the North American student centre, simultaneously serving cultural, intellectual and recreational interests within its large Gothic-revival complex.

The University of Toronto has educated two Governors General and four Prime Ministers of Canada, four foreign leaders, fourteen Justices of the Supreme Court, and has been affiliated with ten Nobel laureates.
Logo Fields Institute

Fields Institute

TorontoMathematics, Statistics, FinanceComputer Science, RoboticsTelecommunication, MultimediaPhysicsDecision Support, StatisticsEconomicsMedicine, General, Internal

The Fields Institute is an international centre for research in mathematical sciences at the University of Toronto. The institute is named for University of Toronto mathematician John Charles Fields, founder of the Fields Medal. It was established in 1992, and was briefly based at the University of Waterloo before relocating to Toronto in 1995.

As a centre for mathematical activity, the institute brings together mathematicians from Canada and abroad. It also supports the collaboration between professional mathematicians and researchers in other domains, such as statistics, computer science, engineering, physical and biological sciences, medicine, economics and finance, telecommunications and information systems. It also holds monthly meetings on mathematics education, attended by participants from secondary school boards, university mathematics departments and the private sector.

The institute occupies a building at the university that was specially conceived and constructed for its activities, designed by Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects. It accommodates up to 66 visitors and their support staff, providing office spaces and full access to the mathematics collection of the University of Toronto Libraries.

The Fields Institute Monographs (FIM) features the research work of the institute, and is jointly published with the American Mathematical Society.
Logo Ryerson University

Ryerson University

TorontoBusinessManagementUrban StudiesCommunication

Ryerson University (commonly referred to as Ryerson) is a public research university located in downtown Toronto, Ontario. Its urban campus surrounds the Yonge-Dundas Square, located at the busiest intersection in downtown Toronto. The university has a focus on applied, career-oriented education. The majority of its buildings are in the blocks northeast of the Yonge-Dundas Square in Toronto's Garden District. Ryerson's business school, Ted Rogers School of Management is on the southwest end of the Yonge-Dundas Square, located on Bay Street, slightly north of Toronto's Financial District and is attached to the Toronto Eaton Centre. The university's most recent expansion, the Mattamy Athletic Centre, is located in the historical Maple Leaf Gardens arena, formerly home of the Toronto Maple Leafs. The university is composed of 36,000+ undergraduate students, 2,000+ graduate students, and 70,000 yearly certificate and continuing education registrations. Ryerson is ranked 4th in Ontario and 10th in Canada by student enrollment.

Ryerson University is home to Canada's largest undergraduate business school, the Ted Rogers School of Management, and Canada's third largest undergraduate engineering school, the George Vari Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science, as well as the Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Communication & Design, Faculty of Community Services, and the Faculty of Science.

In addition to offering full-time and part-time undergraduate and graduate programs leading to Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral degrees, the university also offers part-time degrees, distance education and certificates through the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education.
Logo Schulich School of Business

Schulich School of Business

TorontoBusinessMathematics, Statistics, FinanceAudit, AccountingPublic Administration

The Schulich School of Business is York University's business school located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Schulich offers undergraduate and graduate degree and diploma programs in business administration, finance, accounting, business analytics, public administration and international business as well as a number of PhD and executive programs. Originally known as the Faculty of Administrative Studies (FAS), it was renamed in 1995 after Seymour Schulich, a major benefactor who has donated $15 million to the School. Although the Schulich School of Business is a Faculty of York University, it operates under a separate budget. The dean of the School, Dezsö J. Horváth, was first appointed in 1988, making his tenure one of the longest at any business school in the world. The School is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA).

Primarily located at the Seymour Schulich Building on the Keele Campus in Toronto, Ontario, the School also maintains an executive education centre in Toronto's Financial District in downtown Toronto and a satellite campus in Hyderabad, India. The School also operates representative offices in Beijing and Shanghai, China; Mumbai, India; Seoul, South Korea; and Moscow, Russia. Schulich offers undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate business degrees that lead to careers in the private, public and nonprofit sectors, and has more than 25,000 alumni working in approximately 90 countries. Schulich pioneered Canada’s first International MBA (IMBA) and International BBA (iBBA) degrees, as well as North America’s first cross-border executive MBA degree, the Kellogg-Schulich Executive MBA. Schulich’s Executive Education Centre provides executive development programs annually to more than 16,000 executives in Canada and abroad.

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