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Logo Karolinska Institutet

Karolinska Institutet

SolnaUrban StudiesMedicine, General, Internal

Karolinska Institutet (KI, unofficially known as the Karolinska Institute and in older English texts as the Royal Caroline Institute) is a medical university in Solna within the Stockholm urban area, Sweden, and one of the largest and most prestigious medical universities in the world. It was founded in 1810 on Kungsholmen on the west side of Stockholm; the main campus was relocated decades later to Solna, just outside Stockholm. A second campus was established more recently in Flemingsberg, Huddinge, south of Stockholm. Karolinska Institutet consistently ranks among the top universities in the world on a number of prestigious ranking tables, and is currently the eighth best university to study medicine in the world.

Karolinska Institutet is Sweden's third oldest medical school, after Uppsala University (founded in 1477) and Lund University (founded in 1666). Research at Karolinska Institutet accounts for more than 40% of all academic medical research in Sweden.

The Karolinska University Hospital, located in Solna and Huddinge, is associated with the university as a research and teaching hospital. Together they form an academic health science centre. It is one of Sweden's largest centres for training and research, accounting for 30 percent of the medical training and 40 percent of the medical academic research conducted nationwide. While most of the medical programs are taught in Swedish, the bulk of the Ph.D. projects are conducted in English.

A committee of the institute appoints the laureates for the Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine. The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet is a body at Karolinska Institutet that awards the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The Nobel Assembly consists of fifty professors from various medical disciplines at Karolinska Institutet.
Logo Stockholm University

Stockholm University

StockholmMathematics, Statistics, Finance Law

Stockholm University (Swedish: Stockholms universitet) is the state university of Stockholm, Sweden. Stockholm University has two scientific fields: the natural sciences and the humanities/social sciences. With over 70,000 students at four different faculties, law, humanities, the mathematical and natural sciences, it is one of the largest universities in Scandinavia. The institution is regarded as one of the top 100 universities in the world by both the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) and the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (THE) - whereas, in the QS World University Rankings, the SU is among the 200 universities in the world. Stockholm University was granted university status in 1960, making it the fourth oldest Swedish university. Stockholm University's primary mission is to provide education and high quality research for the betterment of the Swedish community.
Logo Science for Life Laboratory

Science for Life Laboratory

SolnaBiology, Biochemistry, BiotechnologyEcology, Evolution, EnvironmentPhysiologyMedicine, General, Internal

SciLifeLab (Science for Life Laboratory) is a world leading Swedish national center for large-scale research and one of the largest molecular biology research laboratories in Europe at the forefront of innovation in life sciences research, computational biology, bioinformatics, training and services in molecular biosciences with focus on health and environmental research. The center combines frontline technical expertise with advanced knowledge of translational medicine and molecular bioscience. SciLifeLab is a joint effort between four of the best ranked institutions in Sweden and Scandinavia (Karolinska Institutet—the institution that awards the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University and Uppsala University). The National Genomics Infrastructure (NGI) hosted at SciLifeLab offers large-scale DNA sequence data generation and analysis.

SciLifeLab was established in 2010 and was appointed a national center in 2013 by the Swedish government. More than 200 elite research groups composed by 1,500 researchers are associated and work at SciLifeLab's two campuses in Stockholm and Uppsala. The Stockholm campus is surrounded by one of the largest hospitals in Europe both the old and the new Karolinska University Hospital buildings, the Karolinska Institute and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. SciLifeLab is provided with SEK 150 million per year in state funds separate from other national and European grants and infrastructure support in the fields of drug discovery, drug development and fundamental research. Together with the prestigious American journal Science, SciLifeLab awards a young researcher prize.
Logo Stockholm School of Business

Stockholm School of Business

StockholmBusiness

Logo Law Faculty of Stockholm University, Stockholm University

Law Faculty of Stockholm University, Stockholm University

StockholmLawPolitical Science

The Faculty of Law at Stockholm University commenced its activities in the autumn term of 1907 as the Department of Political and Legal Science at the University College of Stockholm, with seven professors and 81 registered students.

By the decision of the Swedish Riksdag in 1959 Stockholm University College was ordered to move to Frescati located outside the Centre of the town. It would take over ten years, however, before the six, blue high-rise blocks were ready to be moved into at the beginning of the 1970s.

Today the Law Faculty is the largest faculty in the country. The Department of Law has between 2500 and 4000 students every year, who study law either following the undergraduate law programme or in the form of independent law courses for non-degree purposes. The Department employs over a hundred full-time teachers for the purposes of teaching and research.

The Faculty has 30 about professors specialising in traditional legal scientific subjects, such as Jurisprudence, Private Law, Fiscal Law, International Law, Public Law, Procedural Law, Legal History and Criminal Law. These scientists have further specialised knowledge of various other fields of law, such as Labour Law, Company Law, Export Law, Real Property Law, Insurance Law, Intellectual Property Law, Marketing Law, the Law of Damages and Transportation Law. In addition to that there is one special chair in European Integration Law.

The Department employs the total of about 155 persons, of which approximately 45 persons represent administrative and technical staff.
Logo Stockholm University

Stockholm University

StockholmMathematics, Statistics, Finance Law

Stockholm University (Swedish: Stockholms universitet) is the state university of Stockholm, Sweden. Stockholm University has two scientific fields: the natural sciences and the humanities/social sciences. With over 70,000 students at four different faculties, law, humanities, the mathematical and natural sciences, it is one of the largest universities in Scandinavia. The institution is regarded as one of the top 100 universities in the world by both the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) and the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (THE) - whereas, in the QS World University Rankings, the SU is among the 200 universities in the world. Stockholm University was granted university status in 1960, making it the fourth oldest Swedish university. Stockholm University's primary mission is to provide education and high quality research for the betterment of the Swedish community.

Lilla Akademien

StockholmMusicInstruments, Instrumentation

Lilla Akademien is a school, founded 1994, which is specially focused on developing musical talent in children, located in Stockholm, Sweden. The Artistic Director and founder of the school is Nina Balabina, Russian violinist and who is also a violin teacher at the school.

Lilla Akademien, best translated as "The Junior Academy", is a unique school specialising in classical music. Housed in an historic building in the Stockholm district Norrmalm, it was founded in 1994 by a group of music teachers under the leadership of Nina Balabina. In its early years, it provided instrumental tuition for young children at the end of the school day, but since 1998 it offers full-time tuition in music and regular schooling for children from 6 years and up. It eventually expanded to include a gymnasium or senior high school, and in 2005 the first graduates got their high school diplomas in the traditional Swedish manner. In a few years, Lilla Akademien has become one of the most significant institutions for the education of young musicians in Scandinavia, and has established itself as an important part of the Stockholm music scene, performing numerous concerts across the country every year. In 2006 Lilla Akademien opened a post-gymnasial 'Pre-college' one-year programme to help bridge the gap between school and higher musical education.

The aim of Lilla Akademien is to give all of its pupils a solid musical foundation on which to build their lives, whether or not they choose to become professional musicians as a profession. The musical life of the school is intense, and great care is taken to foster a joyful rather than competitive spirit. Priority is given to the creation of an artistic personality for each pupil, and individuality is encouraged. Many of the students at the school have backgrounds in countries other than Sweden, which the school is very proud of. They feel that this reflects the multicultural flavour of Stockholm.

At Lilla Akademien children receive individual lessons in one or more instruments, including piano, organ, violin, viola, cello, double bass, recorder, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, tuba, harp and percussion. Class music lessons include music theory, aural training, music history, and - in the gymnasium - musical analysis. Singing in the school choir is compulsory up to the age of 17. The music programme is complemented by courses in dance, visual arts and foreign languages. The school follows the Swedish national curriculum and also offers after-school activities for the younger children whose parents work. The school has five orchestras and numerous ensembles. Rehearsals and concert performances are seen as a highly important part of the pupils' education. Pupils have performed both in Sweden and abroad and have been awarded major prizes in international competitions. Lilla Akademien's orchestras have been on many international tours to huge critical acclaim.

The school leadership strives to establish an extensive network of international contacts for pupil exchanges, guest teacher programmes, and concerts in other countries. Collaborative ventures have already taken place with similar schools in England, Estonia and other parts of Europe.
Logo New Karolinska Solna University Hospital

New Karolinska Solna University Hospital

Solna

The New Karolinska Solna University Hospital (NKS) (Swedish: Nya Karolinska Solna), is the new university hospital to be built in Stockholm, Sweden, replacing the present Karolinska University Hospital. Estimated completion is December 2015.

NKS is also Sweden's first public-private partnership (PPP) project in healthcare. The process for contracting, planning and building the hospital has been heavily criticized by an independent review published by Timbro (
http://timbro.se/valfard/rapporter/skandalen-nya-karolinska). When the hospital was planned, there was an inadequate assessment of the costs of renovating the old Karolinska and the focus was on architectural design and only after a competition had been held was there feedback from a medical perspective. The hospital is smaller than the current Karolinska and does not meet the future needs of an ageing population with increasing healthcare demands. The contracting of the hospital was also not performed correctly as there was only one bid on the tender. The cost of the hospital is currently estimated to 50 000 million SEK and this does not take into account the costs of increasing the number of beds in other Stockholm hospitals or alternatively keeping the old Karolinska to have sufficient number of hospital beds for future needs. The building costs widely exceed those of other, similar projects in Europe and the US. The contracts and details of the New Karolinska have been classified as confidential information despite the bill being picked up by Stockholm taxpayers.

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