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Logo San Jose State University

San Jose State University

San Jose

San José State University (commonly referred to as San Jose State or SJSU) is a comprehensive public university located in San Jose, California, United States. It is the founding school of the 23 campus California State University (CSU) system, and holds the distinction of being the oldest public institution of higher education on the West Coast of the United States.

Located in downtown San Jose, the SJSU main campus is situated on 154 acres (62 ha), or roughly 19 square blocks. SJSU offers 134 bachelor's and master's degrees with 110 concentrations and five credential programs with 19 concentrations. The university also offers three joint doctoral degree programs and one independent doctoral program as of 2014. SJSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

SJSU's total enrollment was 32,697 in fall 2014, including over 6,000 graduate students and other post-baccalaureate students. As of fall 2013, graduate student enrollment at SJSU was the highest of any campus in the CSU system. SJSU's student population is one of the most ethnically diverse in the nation, with large Asian and Hispanic enrollments, as well as the highest foreign student enrollment of all master's institutions in the United States. As of fall 2014, the top five most popular undergraduate majors at SJSU were (in descending order of popularity): psychology, accounting, marketing, business management and biological sciences. As of fall 2014, the top five most popular graduate programs were (in descending order of popularity): software engineering, electrical engineering, library and information sciences, social work and occupational therapy.

San José State University claims to provide Silicon Valley firms with more engineering, computer science and business graduates than any other college or university, and philanthropic support of SJSU is among the highest in the CSU system. SJSU sports teams are known as the Spartans, and compete in the Mountain West Conference (MWC) in NCAA Division I.
Logo De Anza College

De Anza College

CupertinoHistory

De Anza College is a 112-acre (45 ha) community college located in Cupertino, California. It was founded in 1967 on the site of the Beaulieu Winery and is named after the Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza. Along with the arrival and growth of Apple Computer, the presence of De Anza College contributed significantly to the growth of Cupertino from a small town to an industrial city and an integral part of Silicon Valley. It consistently ranks #1 or #2 in the state for the total number of students who annually transfer to University of California and California State University campuses. The college is also the home of the California History Center, housed in a mansion called "Le Petit Trianon". The current president of De Anza college is Brian Murphy, replacing Martha Kanter who later became the Under Secretary of Education for the Obama Administration. The average class size at De Anza is 35, and approximately 2,800 students transfer per year. It also attracts a heavy international student population.

De Anza College is part of Silicon Valley's Foothill-De Anza Community College District, which also administers Foothill College in nearby Los Altos Hills, California. The district serves the cities of Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Sunnyvale and San Jose. The district headquarters is on the Foothill campus.

Each year, De Anza invites several celebrities and dignitaries for public speaking engagements at its main theater, the Flint Center. De Anza once held the second largest pow-wow in the Bay Area, but the pow-wow organizers moved the event in 2005.

De Anza holds a monthly flea market in its parking lot, which has become a community tradition as well as major source of income for the De Anza Associated Student Body (DASB). With a budget of over 1 million dollars, the DASB has one of the biggest student budgets of any community college in California.

De Anza formerly had their own campus police. They used to wear slacks and polo shirts, and officers were unarmed. The department was not a POST participating agency and in 2001, the campus police departments at De Anza and Foothill College were merged to become the Foothill-De Anza College District Police.
Logo Stanford University

Stanford University

StanfordEarth Science

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University) is a private research university in Stanford, California, and one of the world's most prestigious institutions, with the top position in numerous rankings and measures in the United States.

Stanford was founded in 1885 by Leland Stanford, former Governor of and U.S. Senator from California and leading railroad tycoon, and his wife, Jane Lathrop Stanford, in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford, Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was opened on October 1, 1891 as a coeducational and non-denominational institution. Tuition was free until 1920. The university struggled financially after Leland Stanford's 1893 death and and again after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Following World War II, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would later be known as Silicon Valley. By 1970, Stanford was home to a linear accelerator, and was one of the original four ARPANET nodes (precursor to the Internet).

The main campus is located in northern Santa Clara Valley adjacent to Palo Alto and between San Jose and San Francisco. Other holdings, such as laboratories, and nature reserves, are located outside the main campus. Its 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus is one of the largest in the United States. The university is also one of the top fundraising institutions in the country, becoming the first school to raise more than a billion dollars in a year.

Stanford's academic strength is broad with 40 departments in the three academic schools that have undergraduate students and another four professional schools. Students compete in 36 varsity sports, and the university is one of two private institutions in the Division I FBS Pacific-12 Conference. It has gained 107 NCAA team championships, the second-most for a university, 476 individual championships, the most in Division I, and has won the NACDA Directors' Cup, recognizing the university with the best overall athletic team achievement, every year since 1994-1995.

Stanford faculty and alumni have founded many companies including Google, Hewlett-Packard, Nike, Sun Microsystems, Instagram and Yahoo!, and companies founded by Stanford alumni generate more than $2.7 trillion in annual revenue, equivalent to the 10th-largest economy in the world. It is the alma mater of 30 living billionaires, 17 astronauts, and 18 Turing Award laureates. It is also one of the leading producers of members of the United States Congress. The University has affiliated with 59 Nobel laureates and 2 Fields Medalists (when awarded).
Logo School of Medicine, Stanford University

School of Medicine, Stanford University

StanfordMedicine, General, InternalHealth Care Sciences, Services

Stanford University School of Medicine is the medical school of Stanford University. It is located at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, California. It is the successor to the Medical Department of the University of the Pacific, founded in San Francisco in 1858 and later named Cooper Medical College; the medical school was acquired by Stanford in 1908. Due to this descent, it ranks as the oldest medical school in the Western United States. The medical school moved to the Stanford campus near Palo Alto, California in 1959.

Clinical rotations occur at several hospital sites. In addition to the Stanford University Medical Center (Stanford Hospital and Clinics) and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford has formal affiliations with Kaiser Permanente, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center and the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Stanford medical students also manage two free clinics: Arbor Free Clinic in Menlo Park and Pacific Free Clinic in San Jose. Stanford is a cutting-edge center for translational and biomedical research (both basic science and clinical) and emphasizes medical innovation, novel methods, discoveries, and interventions in its integrated curriculum.

The School of Medicine also has a Physician Assistant (PA) program that was added in 1971, called the Primary Care Associate Program. It was one of the first accredited physician assistant programs in California. It is offered in association with Foothill College. The program has graduated more than 1,300 physician assistants since its opening. Most graduates fulfill the program's mission of serving underserved medical communities.
Logo Stanford University

Stanford University

StanfordEarth Science

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University) is a private research university in Stanford, California, and one of the world's most prestigious institutions, with the top position in numerous rankings and measures in the United States.

Stanford was founded in 1885 by Leland Stanford, former Governor of and U.S. Senator from California and leading railroad tycoon, and his wife, Jane Lathrop Stanford, in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford, Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was opened on October 1, 1891 as a coeducational and non-denominational institution. Tuition was free until 1920. The university struggled financially after Leland Stanford's 1893 death and and again after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Following World War II, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would later be known as Silicon Valley. By 1970, Stanford was home to a linear accelerator, and was one of the original four ARPANET nodes (precursor to the Internet).

The main campus is located in northern Santa Clara Valley adjacent to Palo Alto and between San Jose and San Francisco. Other holdings, such as laboratories, and nature reserves, are located outside the main campus. Its 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus is one of the largest in the United States. The university is also one of the top fundraising institutions in the country, becoming the first school to raise more than a billion dollars in a year.

Stanford's academic strength is broad with 40 departments in the three academic schools that have undergraduate students and another four professional schools. Students compete in 36 varsity sports, and the university is one of two private institutions in the Division I FBS Pacific-12 Conference. It has gained 107 NCAA team championships, the second-most for a university, 476 individual championships, the most in Division I, and has won the NACDA Directors' Cup, recognizing the university with the best overall athletic team achievement, every year since 1994-1995.

Stanford faculty and alumni have founded many companies including Google, Hewlett-Packard, Nike, Sun Microsystems, Instagram and Yahoo!, and companies founded by Stanford alumni generate more than $2.7 trillion in annual revenue, equivalent to the 10th-largest economy in the world. It is the alma mater of 30 living billionaires, 17 astronauts, and 18 Turing Award laureates. It is also one of the leading producers of members of the United States Congress. The University has affiliated with 59 Nobel laureates and 2 Fields Medalists (when awarded).
Logo Stanford Law School

Stanford Law School

StanfordLaw

Stanford Law School (also known as Stanford Law or SLS) is a professional graduate school of Stanford University, located in the Silicon Valley near Palo Alto, California. Established in 1893, Stanford Law is currently ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the second best law school in the United States and has been ranked as one of the top three law schools (with Yale Law School and Harvard Law School) every year since 1992.

Stanford Law School employs more than 70 full-time and part-time faculty members and enrolls over 500 students who are working toward their Doctor of Jurisprudence (J.D.) degree. Stanford Law also confers four advanced legal degrees: a Master of Laws (LL.M.), a Master of Studies in Law (M.S.L.), a Master of the Science of Law (J.S.M.), and a Doctor of the Science of Law (J.S.D.). Each fall, Stanford Law enrolls a J.D. class of approximately 180 students, giving Stanford the smallest student body of any law school ranked in the top fourteen (T14). Stanford also maintains eleven full-time legal clinics, including the nation's first and most active Supreme Court litigation clinic, and offers 27 formal joint degree programs.

Stanford Law alumni include several of the first women to occupy Chief Justice or Associate Justice posts on supreme courts: current Chief Justice of New Zealand Sian Elias, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the late Associate Justice of the Hawaii Supreme Court Rhoda V. Lewis, and the late Chief Justice of Washington Barbara Durham. Other justices of supreme courts who graduated from Stanford Law include the late Chief Justice of the United States William Rehnquist, retired Chief Justice of California Ronald M. George, retired California Supreme Court Justice Carlos R. Moreno, and the late California Supreme Court Justice Frank K. Richardson.
Logo Stanford University

Stanford University

StanfordEarth Science

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University) is a private research university in Stanford, California, and one of the world's most prestigious institutions, with the top position in numerous rankings and measures in the United States.

Stanford was founded in 1885 by Leland Stanford, former Governor of and U.S. Senator from California and leading railroad tycoon, and his wife, Jane Lathrop Stanford, in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford, Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was opened on October 1, 1891 as a coeducational and non-denominational institution. Tuition was free until 1920. The university struggled financially after Leland Stanford's 1893 death and and again after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Following World War II, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would later be known as Silicon Valley. By 1970, Stanford was home to a linear accelerator, and was one of the original four ARPANET nodes (precursor to the Internet).

The main campus is located in northern Santa Clara Valley adjacent to Palo Alto and between San Jose and San Francisco. Other holdings, such as laboratories, and nature reserves, are located outside the main campus. Its 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus is one of the largest in the United States. The university is also one of the top fundraising institutions in the country, becoming the first school to raise more than a billion dollars in a year.

Stanford's academic strength is broad with 40 departments in the three academic schools that have undergraduate students and another four professional schools. Students compete in 36 varsity sports, and the university is one of two private institutions in the Division I FBS Pacific-12 Conference. It has gained 107 NCAA team championships, the second-most for a university, 476 individual championships, the most in Division I, and has won the NACDA Directors' Cup, recognizing the university with the best overall athletic team achievement, every year since 1994-1995.

Stanford faculty and alumni have founded many companies including Google, Hewlett-Packard, Nike, Sun Microsystems, Instagram and Yahoo!, and companies founded by Stanford alumni generate more than $2.7 trillion in annual revenue, equivalent to the 10th-largest economy in the world. It is the alma mater of 30 living billionaires, 17 astronauts, and 18 Turing Award laureates. It is also one of the leading producers of members of the United States Congress. The University has affiliated with 59 Nobel laureates and 2 Fields Medalists (when awarded).
Logo University of Redwood

University of Redwood

Stanford

University of Redwood is a fictitious college claiming to be located in Oregon in the United States. It can be confused with Reed College in Portland, Oregon, or the College of the Redwoods in Eureka, California.

The Redwood website copies the Reed website, except it substitutes the institution's name. However, on at least the About page, the copiers failed and at one point left the Reed name intact. The street address and phone numbers for Reed's Cooley Art Gallery remain intact on the Redwood site. At one point, the entire faculty directory of Reed was listed on the Redwood site. While Reed was founded by Simeon and Amanda Reed, Redwood was founded by Simeon and Amanda Redwood.

As first reported by Inside Higher Ed, at least one man living in China created the Redwood site in June 2010. Reed first discovered the Redwood site in October 2010 and sent letters to Redwood's internet service provider under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act demanding that the copyrighted materials be taken down. The site was removed within a few days. However, the site was restored in November when its owners claimed that the infringing materials were removed. Reed officials rediscovered the site in January 2011; as of February 2011 they once again were able to have the site taken down. According to Martin Ringle, chief technology officer of Reed, the site could be used to collect admission application fees fraudulently from Asian students. Upon receiving an application, "a shrewd scammer could wait several weeks, then issue a rejection letter, and the student would never know" that Redwood did not exist. Ringle claimed he found Redwood mentioned on Asian higher-education blogs.

The Redwood website lists a mailing address in Torrance, California, that belongs to a mail-forwarding company. That company forwards the mail to China. It also lists a fax number with a 650 area code, which is assigned to the Bay Area south of San Francisco, California.
Logo Santa Clara University

Santa Clara University

Santa ClaraArchitecture Business Law Psychology Theology, Religion

Santa Clara University is a private non-profit Jesuit university located in Santa Clara, California. It has 5,435 full-time undergraduate students, and 3,335 graduate students. Founded in 1851, Santa Clara University is the oldest operating institution of higher learning in California, and has remained in its original location for 162 years. The University's campus surrounds the historic Mission Santa Clara de Asis, which traces its founding to 1776. The Campus mirrors the Mission's architectural style, and provides a fine early example of Mission Revival Architecture.

The university offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees through its six colleges, the School of Arts and Sciences, School of Education and Counseling Psychology, SCU Leavey School of Business, School of Engineering, Jesuit School of Theology, and the School of Law.

Santa Clara's sports teams are called the Broncos. Their colors are red and white. The Broncos compete at the NCAA Division I levels as members of the West Coast Conference in 19 sports. The Broncos own a long history of success on the national stage in a number of sports.

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