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Logo Drexel University

Drexel University

PhiladelphiaBank, InsuranceLaw

Drexel University is a private research university with three campuses in Philadelphia and one in Sacramento, California. It was founded in 1891 by Anthony J. Drexel, a noted financier and philanthropist. Drexel offers over 70 full-time undergraduate programs and accelerated degrees. At the graduate level, the university offers over 100 masters, doctoral, and professional programs, many available part-time.

Drexel is best known for the cooperative education program (co-op). Drexel's co-op is regularly ranked as one of the best co-op programs in the United States. Participating students have a variety of opportunities to gain up to 18-months of paid full-time working experience before graduation. The university has a large network of more than 1,600 corporate, governmental, and non-profit partners in 28 states and 25 international locations. The employers include top ranked multinational law firms, banks, corporations, and many Fortune 500 companies, such as Goldman Sachs, Microsoft, and Procter & Gamble.

Shanghai Jiao Tong University's academic ranking of world universities ranks Drexel 401-500 and Times Higher Education World University Rankings placed Drexel among the top 200 universities in the World. In U.S. News & World Report's annual "America's Best Colleges List", the university has been ranked consistently among the "Best National Universities – Top Schools." The 2012 rankings place Drexel third in their list of "Up and Coming National Universities" for "promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty, and student life." In addition, the National Science Foundation and the 2009 Lombardi Report also ranked Drexel among the top 50 private comprehensive research universities. Drexel University ranks #45 among "Research Universities by Salary Potential" in the United States.
Logo University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaBusinessEthnic, Family StudiesClassicsTheology, ReligionMedicine, General, Internal

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges. Penn claims to be the oldest university in the United States of America.

Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology although Franklin's curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School of Business, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization, (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.

Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, business school, law school, engineering school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate program is also among the most selective in the country, with an acceptance rate of 10 percent. One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").

All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the rubella and hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.

Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, and university presidents. According to a 2014 study, the University of Pennsylvania has produced the most billionaires of any university at the undergraduate level. Penn's endowment, at $9.6 billion in 2014, is the tenth largest university endowment in the United States and the thirtieth largest on a per-student basis.
Logo Saint Joseph's University

Saint Joseph's University

Merion StationBusiness

Saint Joseph's University (also referred to as SJU or St. Joe's) is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic Jesuit university located in the Overbrook neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America, and the Lower Merion Township on the historic Pennsylvania Main Line. The University was founded in 1851 as Saint Joseph's College by the Society of Jesus. Saint Joseph's is the seventh oldest Jesuit university in the United States and one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities.

Saint Joseph's University educates over 9,000 undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students each year through the Erivan K. Haub School of Business, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Program of Professional & Liberal Studies, and the Haub Degree Completion Program. The University offers over 60 undergraduate majors, 53 graduate programs, 28 study-abroad programs, 12 special-study options, a co-op program, a joint degree program with Thomas Jefferson University, and an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership. It has 17 centers and institutes, including the prestigious Kinney Center for Autism Education & Support and Pedro Arrupe Center for Business Ethics.

Saint Joseph's has grown in physical size and scope since 2001 with the addition of the Maguire Campus, construction of new campus buildings, and the addition of new majors and programs annually. For the 2014 U.S. News and World Report rankings, in the Master's Universities (North) category, Saint Joseph's was ranked number 11.

The Saint Joseph's University athletics teams are called the Hawks. The Hawks are a NCAA Division I program that compete in the Atlantic-10 Conference and Philadelphia's Big 5. The official colors of the University are crimson and grey. The school mascot is the famous Hawk, which never stops flapping its wings while in costume.
Logo University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaBusiness Ethnic, Family Studies Classics Theology, Religion Medicine, General, Internal

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges. Penn claims to be the oldest university in the United States of America.

Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology although Franklin's curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School of Business, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization, (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.

Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, business school, law school, engineering school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate program is also among the most selective in the country, with an acceptance rate of 10 percent. One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").

All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the rubella and hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.

Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, and university presidents. According to a 2014 study, the University of Pennsylvania has produced the most billionaires of any university at the undergraduate level. Penn's endowment, at $9.6 billion in 2014, is the tenth largest university endowment in the United States and the thirtieth largest on a per-student basis.
Logo Rutgers University

Rutgers University

Piscataway TownshipLaw Agriculture, Fisheries, Food

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (/ˈrʌtɡərz/), commonly referred to as Rutgers University, Rutgers, or RU, is an American public research university and the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey.

Originally chartered as Queen's College on November 10, 1766, Rutgers is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine "Colonial Colleges" founded before the American Revolution. The college was renamed Rutgers College in 1825 in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830), a New York City landowner, philanthropist and former military officer, whose generous donation to the school allowed it to reopen after years of financial difficulty. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church and admitted only male students. The college expanded its role in research and instruction in agriculture, engineering, and science when it was named as the state's sole land-grant college in 1864 under the Morrill Act of 1862. It gained university status in 1924 with the introduction of graduate education and further expansion. However, Rutgers evolved into a coeducational public research university after being designated "The State University of New Jersey" by the New Jersey Legislature in laws enacted in 1945 and 1956. It is one of only two colonial colleges that later became public universities. Rutgers, however, remains something of a public-private hybrid, in particular retaining certain "private rights" against unilateral changes in its governance, name, and structure that the state might otherwise want to impose.

Rutgers has three campuses located throughout New Jersey: The New Brunswick campus in New Brunswick and adjacent Piscataway, the Newark campus and the Camden campus. The university has additional facilities elsewhere in New Jersey. Instruction is offered by 9,000 faculty members in 175 academic departments to over 45,000 undergraduate students and more than 20,000 graduate and professional students.

The University is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the Association of American Universities and the Universities Research Association
Logo Rutgers School of Law - Camden, Rutgers University

Rutgers School of Law - Camden, Rutgers University

CamdenLawBusiness

Rutgers Law School is a public law school of Rutgers University located in Camden, New Jersey on the Delaware Waterfront. It is one of two unified law schools of Rutgers University, the other located in Newark, and one of only two law schools in the state of New Jersey. The law school is located on the main campus of Rutgers–Camden, just 3 miles (4.8 km) away from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania via the immediately neighboring Benjamin Franklin Bridge. The law school officially merged with Rutgers School of Law-Newark in August 2015, after gaining ABA approval, creating a unified Rutgers Law School.

Originally opened in 1926 as "South Jersey Law School" by Collingswood mayor and businessperson Arthur E. Armitage, Sr. and an interested group of citizens, the law school merged with Rutgers University in 1950. The school is approved by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools. Students are graduates of 140 different colleges and universities. The school consistently ranks in the second tier of law schools in the nation and is currently ranked 91st among the Top 100 law schools in the 2013 edition of U.S. News & World Report's "Best Graduate Schools", but has ranked higher in previous years (i.e. 65th in 2006, 2007, 2009). The school's legal writing program is ranked 11th in the nation by U.S. News and has been consistently ranked among the top legal writing programs in the past decade. Its part-time program was ranked 9th in the nation for 2013.

In January 2009, Rutgers Law School, in Camden, completed construction of a new facility designed by Ayers Saint Gross. The 53,000 square feet (4,900 m2) addition to the existing law school cost approximately $24 million and added classrooms, office space, and the 'Archer & Greiner Moot Courtroom.' The project included renovations in the existing facility, expanded social areas and clinical space. A two-story glass bridge spans Fifth Street in Camden and is visible to travelers on the Benjamin Franklin Bridge.
Logo Rutgers University

Rutgers University

Piscataway TownshipLaw Agriculture, Fisheries, Food

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (/ˈrʌtɡərz/), commonly referred to as Rutgers University, Rutgers, or RU, is an American public research university and the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey.

Originally chartered as Queen's College on November 10, 1766, Rutgers is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine "Colonial Colleges" founded before the American Revolution. The college was renamed Rutgers College in 1825 in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830), a New York City landowner, philanthropist and former military officer, whose generous donation to the school allowed it to reopen after years of financial difficulty. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church and admitted only male students. The college expanded its role in research and instruction in agriculture, engineering, and science when it was named as the state's sole land-grant college in 1864 under the Morrill Act of 1862. It gained university status in 1924 with the introduction of graduate education and further expansion. However, Rutgers evolved into a coeducational public research university after being designated "The State University of New Jersey" by the New Jersey Legislature in laws enacted in 1945 and 1956. It is one of only two colonial colleges that later became public universities. Rutgers, however, remains something of a public-private hybrid, in particular retaining certain "private rights" against unilateral changes in its governance, name, and structure that the state might otherwise want to impose.

Rutgers has three campuses located throughout New Jersey: The New Brunswick campus in New Brunswick and adjacent Piscataway, the Newark campus and the Camden campus. The university has additional facilities elsewhere in New Jersey. Instruction is offered by 9,000 faculty members in 175 academic departments to over 45,000 undergraduate students and more than 20,000 graduate and professional students.

The University is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the Association of American Universities and the Universities Research Association
Logo Law School, University of Pennsylvania

Law School, University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaLaw

The University of Pennsylvania Law School, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the law school of the University of Pennsylvania. A member of the Ivy League, it is among the oldest and most selective law schools in the nation. It is currently ranked 7th overall by U.S. News & World Report,. It offers the degrees of Juris Doctor (J.D.), Master of Laws (LL.M.), Master of Comparative Laws (LL.C.M.), and Doctor of the Science of Law (S.J.D.).

The entering class typically consists of approximately 250 students, and admission is highly competitive. For the class entering in the fall of 2014, 16% out of 5859 applicants were offered admission, with 250 matriculating. The 25th and 75th LSAT percentiles for the 2014 entering class were 164 and 170, respectively, with a median of 169. The 25th and 75th undergraduate GPA percentiles were 3.52 and 3.95, respectively, with a median of 3.89. Penn Law's July 2012 Pennsylvania Bar Examination passage rate was 96.08%. The Law School is one of the "T14" law schools, that is, schools that have consistently ranked within the top 14 law schools since U.S. News & World Report began publishing rankings.

The Law School emphasizes cross-disciplinary education, through courses, certificates, and joint/dual degree programs with the other graduate and professional schools on the Penn campus, such as the Wharton School. The school prides itself on its collegiality and the importance it places on diversity. Over a third of students identify as persons of color, and 12% of students enrolled with an advanced degree.

Although well known for its corporate and criminal law faculty, the Law School offers an extensive curriculum and hosts various student groups, research centers and activities. Students publish the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the oldest law journal in the country. Among the school's alumni are a US Supreme Court Justice, several state Supreme Court Justices and supreme court justices of foreign countries, as well as several founders of law firms, university presidents and deans, business entrepreneurs, and politicians.

According to Penn's 2014 ABA-required disclosures, 94.24% of the Class of 2014 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation, excluding solo practitioners.
Logo University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaBusiness Ethnic, Family Studies Classics Theology, Religion Medicine, General, Internal

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges. Penn claims to be the oldest university in the United States of America.

Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology although Franklin's curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School of Business, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization, (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.

Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, business school, law school, engineering school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate program is also among the most selective in the country, with an acceptance rate of 10 percent. One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").

All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the rubella and hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.

Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, and university presidents. According to a 2014 study, the University of Pennsylvania has produced the most billionaires of any university at the undergraduate level. Penn's endowment, at $9.6 billion in 2014, is the tenth largest university endowment in the United States and the thirtieth largest on a per-student basis.
Logo Valley Forge Military Academy and College

Valley Forge Military Academy and College

WaynePhysics

Valley Forge Military Academy & College (usually shortened as VFMA&C) is an American preparatory boarding school (grades 7-12) and coeducational (as of Fall 2006) junior college in the military school tradition located in Wayne, Pennsylvania. Though military in tradition and form, Valley Forge Military Academy (the high school portion of VFMA&C) is a college preparatory boarding institution specializing on student leadership. VFMA&C's administration is composed almost entirely of current or retired military and the Board of Trustees are almost entirely alumni. Some graduates pursue careers in armed services, and VFMA&C has one Rhodes Scholar. VFMA&C and the Duke of York's Royal Military School, United Kingdom have become sister institutions. VFMAC has strong ties with various Royal Families and organizations.

The Valley Forge Corps of Cadets is the only American military organization that maintains British drill and ceremonies. The entire student body (Academy and College) pledge to an honor code and is obligated to cadet duties and responsibilities. The Corps of Cadets is entirely student run. All cadets must pass a board and earn a "Capshield" to be a member of the Corps of Cadets. Valley Forge Military Academy and College is unique among American secondary and higher education to have the only, student run and the only physically demanding, six week military indoctrination, held twice a year, called "Plebe System." It is also the only Corps of Cadets in the United States to still have a traditional mounted battalion of one cavalry troop and one artillery battery. The VFMAC Alumni Association has one of the largest and busiest alumni participation in the nation.

Valley Forge Military College, "The Military College of Pennsylvania," is unique as it is the only private junior military college in the United States where the entire college student body is military cadets from the US and international cadets. All students are members of the Corps of Cadets. The Academy & College was fully residential, but in recent years the academy also offers a day student program. VFMC is the only military college that caters to all branches of the US military through the ROTC and the "Prepster" program for all 5 US Federal Service Academies.
Logo University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaBusiness Ethnic, Family Studies Classics Theology, Religion Medicine, General, Internal

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges. Penn claims to be the oldest university in the United States of America.

Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology although Franklin's curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School of Business, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization, (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.

Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, business school, law school, engineering school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate program is also among the most selective in the country, with an acceptance rate of 10 percent. One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").

All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the rubella and hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.

Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, and university presidents. According to a 2014 study, the University of Pennsylvania has produced the most billionaires of any university at the undergraduate level. Penn's endowment, at $9.6 billion in 2014, is the tenth largest university endowment in the United States and the thirtieth largest on a per-student basis.
Logo University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaBusiness Ethnic, Family Studies Classics Theology, Religion Medicine, General, Internal

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges. Penn claims to be the oldest university in the United States of America.

Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology although Franklin's curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School of Business, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization, (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.

Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, business school, law school, engineering school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate program is also among the most selective in the country, with an acceptance rate of 10 percent. One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").

All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the rubella and hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.

Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, and university presidents. According to a 2014 study, the University of Pennsylvania has produced the most billionaires of any university at the undergraduate level. Penn's endowment, at $9.6 billion in 2014, is the tenth largest university endowment in the United States and the thirtieth largest on a per-student basis.
Logo University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

PhiladelphiaBusiness Ethnic, Family Studies Classics Theology, Religion Medicine, General, Internal

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine original Colonial Colleges. Penn claims to be the oldest university in the United States of America.

Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology although Franklin's curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School of Business, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization, (Houston Hall, 1896) were all born at Penn.

Penn offers a broad range of academic departments, an extensive research enterprise and a number of community outreach and public service programs. It is particularly well known for its medical school, dental school, design school, business school, law school, engineering school, communications school, nursing school, veterinary school, its social sciences and humanities programs, as well as its biomedical teaching and research capabilities. Its undergraduate program is also among the most selective in the country, with an acceptance rate of 10 percent. One of Penn's most well known academic qualities is its emphasis on interdisciplinary education, which it promotes through numerous joint degree programs, research centers and professorships, a unified campus, and the ability for students to take classes from any of Penn's schools (the "One University Policy").

All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. Penn is consistently ranked among the top research universities in the world, for both quality and quantity of research. In fiscal year 2011, Penn topped the Ivy League in academic research spending with an $814 million budget, involving some 4,000 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,400 support staff/graduate assistants. As one of the most active and prolific research institutions, Penn is associated with several important innovations and discoveries in many fields of science and the humanities. Among them are the first general purpose electronic computer (ENIAC), the rubella and hepatitis B vaccines, Retin-A, cognitive therapy, conjoint analysis and others.

Penn's academic and research programs are led by a large and highly productive faculty. Nine Penn faculty members or graduates have won a Nobel Prize in the last ten years. Over its long history the university has also produced many distinguished alumni. These include twelve heads of state (including one U.S. President), three United States Supreme Court justices, and supreme court justices of other states, founders of technology companies, international law firms and global financial institutions, and university presidents. According to a 2014 study, the University of Pennsylvania has produced the most billionaires of any university at the undergraduate level. Penn's endowment, at $9.6 billion in 2014, is the tenth largest university endowment in the United States and the thirtieth largest on a per-student basis.
Logo Doane Academy

Doane Academy

Burlington

Doane Academy is a coeducational independent private day school located in Burlington, New Jersey. It was founded as St. Mary's Hall in May 1837 by the Right Reverend George Washington Doane, the second Episcopal bishop of New Jersey, and is recognized as the first all-girls, academic boarding school in the United States. Originally founded to offer an education equal to that of men, it accepted girls and young women as undergraduates and postgraduates. In 1966 an all-boys school, Doane Academy, was opened in Burlington in association with St. Mary's Hall. In 1974, the two schools merged to form the co-educational St. Mary's Hall-Doane Academy. In April 2008 the name was shortened to Doane Academy.

Three buildings on campus are of historical importance, including the Chapel of the Holy Innocents, which has been called the first Gothic cruciform church in the United States. The building has been recorded in the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), with measured drawings held by the Library of Congress. The campus is currently expanding, with the construction of Rowan Hall (Nov 2014), a three-story building which will add eleven classrooms as well as meeting and administrative spaces.

The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1989.

As of the 2014-15 school year, the school had an enrollment of 205 students and 30 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of approximately 7:1.

On January 9, 2015, the school announced that Mr. Henry M. Rowan and his wife, long-time benefactors, had established a $17 million endowment for Doane Academy, with the proceeds available to the school in perpetuity. Because of their generous donation, Doane Academy is building another building connecting Scarborough Hall (1912) and Odenheimer Hall (1869) in their honor called Rowan Hall. Construction is to be finished by the 2015-2016 school year. The Rowan Family Foundation continues to support the school at a high level.

Doane Academy is a member of NJAIS, NAIS and NAES.
Logo Reformed Episcopal Seminary

Reformed Episcopal Seminary

Blue BellTheology, Religion

Logo Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College

Swarthmore

Swarthmore College (/ˈswɑːθ.mɔr/ SWAHTH-mor locally, or /ˈswɔrθ.mɔr/ SWAWRTH-mor), informally known as Swat, is a private liberal arts college located in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, 11 miles (17.7 km) southwest of Philadelphia.

Founded in 1864, Swarthmore was one of the earliest coeducational colleges in the United States. The school was organized by a committee of Quakers from three "Hicksite" yearly meetings: Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia. Many of the founders were prominent in the abolitionist and women's rights movements and other social concerns and included Edward Parrish, (1822-1872), Deborah and Joseph Wharton, Benjamin Hallowell, and James and Lucretia Mott, (1793-1880). Swarthmore was established to be a college, "...under the care of Friends, at which an education may be obtained equal to that of the best institutions of learning in our country." By 1906 Swarthmore dropped its religious affiliation, becoming officially non-sectarian.

Swarthmore is a member of the "Tri-College Consortium", a cooperative arrangement among Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr, and Haverford Colleges. The consortium shares an integrated library system of more than three million volumes, and students are able to cross-register in courses at all three institutions. A common Quaker heritage exists amongst the consortium schools and the University of Pennsylvania also extends this cross-registration agreement to classes at the University of Pennsylvania's College of Arts and Sciences.

Swarthmore students have won 30 Rhodes Scholarships, 8 Marshall Scholarships, 151 Fulbright Scholarships, 22 Truman Scholarships, 13 Luce Scholarships, 67 Watson Fellowships, 3 Soros Fellowships, 18 Goldwater Scholarships, 84 Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowships, 13 National Endowment for the Humanities Grants for Younger Scholars, 234 National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships, 35 Woodrow Wilson Fellowships, and 2 Mitchell Scholarships.
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Drexel University

PhiladelphiaBank, Insurance Law

Drexel University is a private research university with three campuses in Philadelphia and one in Sacramento, California. It was founded in 1891 by Anthony J. Drexel, a noted financier and philanthropist. Drexel offers over 70 full-time undergraduate programs and accelerated degrees. At the graduate level, the university offers over 100 masters, doctoral, and professional programs, many available part-time.

Drexel is best known for the cooperative education program (co-op). Drexel's co-op is regularly ranked as one of the best co-op programs in the United States. Participating students have a variety of opportunities to gain up to 18-months of paid full-time working experience before graduation. The university has a large network of more than 1,600 corporate, governmental, and non-profit partners in 28 states and 25 international locations. The employers include top ranked multinational law firms, banks, corporations, and many Fortune 500 companies, such as Goldman Sachs, Microsoft, and Procter & Gamble.

Shanghai Jiao Tong University's academic ranking of world universities ranks Drexel 401-500 and Times Higher Education World University Rankings placed Drexel among the top 200 universities in the World. In U.S. News & World Report's annual "America's Best Colleges List", the university has been ranked consistently among the "Best National Universities – Top Schools." The 2012 rankings place Drexel third in their list of "Up and Coming National Universities" for "promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty, and student life." In addition, the National Science Foundation and the 2009 Lombardi Report also ranked Drexel among the top 50 private comprehensive research universities. Drexel University ranks #45 among "Research Universities by Salary Potential" in the United States.
Logo Haverford College

Haverford College

HaverfordPhilosophy

Haverford College (/ˈhævərfərd/ HA-vər-fərd) is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, United States, a suburb of Philadelphia. All students of the College are undergraduates, and nearly all reside on campus.

The college was founded in 1833 by area members of the Orthodox Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) to ensure an education grounded in Quaker values for young Quaker men. Although the college no longer has a formal religious affiliation, the Quaker philosophy still influences campus life. Originally an all-male institution, Haverford began admitting female transfer students in the 1970s and became fully co-educational in 1980. Currently, more than half of Haverford's students are women. For most of the 20th century, Haverford's total enrollment was kept below 300, but the school went through two periods of expansion after the 1970s, and its current enrollment is 1,190 students.

Haverford is a member of the Tri-College Consortium, which allows students to register for courses at both Bryn Mawr College and Swarthmore College. It is also a member of the Quaker Consortium ("Penn-Pal") which allows students to cross-register at the College of General Studies and the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

The college has produced 67 Fulbright Scholars, 62 Watson Fellows, 24 Goldwater Scholars, 20 Rhodes Scholars, 18 Guggenheim Fellows, 4 MacArthur Fellows, and 3 Nobel Prize Recipients.

Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine

PhiladelphiaMedicine, General, Internal

The Smilow Translational Research Center at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine

The Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine is located at 34th and Civic Center Blvd, on the former site of the Philadelphia Civic Center, on the campus of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The $302-million project was designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects and completed in 2008. It is the largest capital project ever undertaken by the University of Pennsylvania Health System.

The Center is home to Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center, radiation oncology, cardiovascular medicine and an outpatient surgical pavilion. One of the most important parts of the Center for Advanced Medicine is the Roberts Proton Therapy Center which houses the largest proton therapy center associated with a medical center in the world. The proton therapy center will be used by both the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, as well as the Penn Health System to treat cancer patients.

Of noted importance is center glass atrium which delivers daylight throughout the building. This design element is part of a patient-focused mission that seeks to coordinate diagnosis and treatment within a healthy setting. In addition to providing patient-focused design and care, the Perelman Center's is designed to anticipate and respond to future trends in medicine. Penn plans for the Perelman Center will accommodate the rapid increase in outpatient surgery and house the most advanced medical technology available.
Logo Salem Community College

Salem Community College

Carneys Point TownshipBusinessNursing

Salem Community College is an accredited, co-educational, two-year public, community college located in Salem County, New Jersey. Salem Community College's main 11-acre (45,000 m2) campus is in Carneys Point Township. SCC is authorized to grant associate degrees — Associate in Arts, Associate in Fine Arts, Associate in Science and Associate in Applied Science — and certificates in over 40 liberal arts, business, practical nursing, scientific glass technology, and technology programs of study.

Salem Community College was founded as Salem County Technical Institute in 1958. Recognizing the college-level caliber of the institute’s programs, the Salem County Board of Chosen Freeholders requested approval to grant degree-awarding authority to the institute. The New Jersey Commission on Higher Education evaluated the institute’s programs and granted the requested approval. On September 3, 1972, Salem Community College was established.

Salem Community College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, which was first granted in 1979, and reaffirmed in 1984, 1990,1995 & 2005.

Joan M. Baillie was appointed Salem Community College’s seventh president on March 22, 2012, after serving as interim president since January 1. Baillie's leadership succeeds the College's longest-serving president, Dr. Peter B. Contini.

Baillie, who has been affiliated with SCC for 20 years, served as Provost-Chief Academic Officer under former President Peter B. Contini. Previously, she was Dean of Academic Affairs, a faculty member and executive director of the SCC Foundation.
Logo Philadelphia Naval Asylum

Philadelphia Naval Asylum

PhiladelphiaArchitecture

The Philadelphia Naval Asylum is a complex of buildings in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built in 1827 as a hospital, it later housed the Philadelphia Naval School, served as a home for retired sailors for the United States Navy from 1834 to 1976, and was ultimately redeveloped as luxury condominiums. The site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971.

Set on more than 20 acres (8.1 ha), the campus includes three buildings designed by architect William Strickland that are considered some of the best examples of Greek Revival architecture in the United States: Biddle Hall (the 1833 main building), the surgeon's residence and the governor's residence.

For seven years, the campus housed the Philadelphia Naval School, a precursor to the United States Naval Academy. Beginning in 1838, midshipmen approaching examinations for promotion were assigned to the school for eight months of study. In 1842, William Chauvenet was placed in charge of the school and formalized much of the study. When the Naval Academy was formed in 1845, four of the seven faculty members came from the Philadelphia school.

In 1889, its name was changed to Naval Home. In 1976, the Naval Home was moved to Gulfport, Mississippi, after it was determined that the Philadelphia facility could not be economically expanded and modernized.

In 1988, the property was sold to residential developer Toll Brothers. The main building was damaged by arsonists in 2003. It has since been restored as luxury condominiums.

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