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Logo Rutgers University

Rutgers University

Piscataway TownshipLawAgriculture, Fisheries, Food

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (/ˈrʌtɡərz/), commonly referred to as Rutgers University, Rutgers, or RU, is an American public research university and the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey.

Originally chartered as Queen's College on November 10, 1766, Rutgers is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine "Colonial Colleges" founded before the American Revolution. The college was renamed Rutgers College in 1825 in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830), a New York City landowner, philanthropist and former military officer, whose generous donation to the school allowed it to reopen after years of financial difficulty. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church and admitted only male students. The college expanded its role in research and instruction in agriculture, engineering, and science when it was named as the state's sole land-grant college in 1864 under the Morrill Act of 1862. It gained university status in 1924 with the introduction of graduate education and further expansion. However, Rutgers evolved into a coeducational public research university after being designated "The State University of New Jersey" by the New Jersey Legislature in laws enacted in 1945 and 1956. It is one of only two colonial colleges that later became public universities. Rutgers, however, remains something of a public-private hybrid, in particular retaining certain "private rights" against unilateral changes in its governance, name, and structure that the state might otherwise want to impose.

Rutgers has three campuses located throughout New Jersey: The New Brunswick campus in New Brunswick and adjacent Piscataway, the Newark campus and the Camden campus. The university has additional facilities elsewhere in New Jersey. Instruction is offered by 9,000 faculty members in 175 academic departments to over 45,000 undergraduate students and more than 20,000 graduate and professional students.

The University is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the Association of American Universities and the Universities Research Association
Logo New York University • NYU

New York University • NYU

New York

New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian American research university based in New York City. Founded in 1831, NYU is the largest private nonprofit institution of American higher education. NYU's main campus is located at Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. The University also established NYU Abu Dhabi, NYU Shanghai and maintains 11 other Global Academic Centers in Accra, Berlin, Buenos Aires, Florence, London, Madrid, Paris, Prague, Sydney, Tel Aviv and Washington, D.C.

NYU was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1950. NYU counts thirty-six Nobel Prize winners, four Abel Prize winners, over thirty National Medals for Science, Technology and Innovation, Arts and Humanities recipients, sixteen Pulitzer Prize winners, over thirty Academy Award winners, as well as several Russ Prize, Gordon Prize, Draper Prize and Turing Award winners, and dozens of Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. NYU also has MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering members among its past and present graduates and faculty. NYU has the most Oscar winners of any university.

NYU is organized into more than twenty schools, colleges, and institutes, located in six centers throughout Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn. According to the Institute of International Education, NYU sends more students to study abroad than any other US college or university, and the College Board reports more online searches by international students for "NYU" than for any other university.
Logo Columbia University

Columbia University

New York

Columbia University (officially Columbia University in the City of New York) is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Originally established in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in New York State, as well as one of the country's nine colonial colleges. After the revolutionary war, King's College briefly became a state entity, and was renamed Columbia College in 1784. A 1787 charter placed the institution under a private board of trustees before it was further renamed Columbia University in 1896 when the campus was moved from Madison Avenue to its current location in Morningside Heights occupying land of 32 acres (13 ha). Columbia is one of the fourteen founding members of the Association of American Universities, and was the first school in the United States to grant the M.D. degree.

The University is organized into twenty schools, including Columbia College, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of General Studies. The University also has global research outposts in Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Paris, Mumbai, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago and Nairobi. It has affiliation with several other institutions nearby, including Teachers College, Barnard College, and Union Theological Seminary, with joint undergraduate programs available through the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, Sciences Po Paris, and the Juilliard School.

Columbia annually administers the Pulitzer Prize. Notable alumni and former students (including those from King's College) include five Founding Fathers of the United States; nine Justices of the United States Supreme Court; 20 living billionaires; 29 Academy Award winners; and 29 heads of state, including three United States Presidents. Additionally, 101 Nobel Prize laureates have been affiliated with it as students, faculty, or staff.
Logo Kean University

Kean University

UnionPhysicsDentistry, Oral SurgeryMedicine, General, InternalMathematics, Statistics, FinanceEthnic, Family StudiesPolitical Science

Kean University /ˈkeɪn/ is a coeducational, public university located in Union and Hillside, New Jersey, United States. Kean University serves its students in the liberal arts, the sciences, and the professions and is best known for its programs in the humanities and social sciences and in education, graduating the most teachers in the state of New Jersey annually. Kean is also noted for the physical therapy program which it holds in conjunction with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

Kean University was founded in 1855 in Newark, New Jersey, as the Newark Normal School. Initially established for the exclusive purpose of being a teacher-education college it became New Jersey State Teachers College in 1937. In 1958, following a post-war boom of students and increasing demands for a more comprehensive curriculum, the college was relocated from Newark to Union Township, site of the Kean family's ancestral home at Liberty Hall. After its move to the historic Livingston-Kean Estate, which includes the entire Liberty Hall acreage, the historic James Townley House, and Kean Hall, which historically housed the library of United States Senator Hamilton Fish Kean and served as a political meeting place, the school became Newark State College, a comprehensive institution providing a full range of academic programs and majors. Renamed Kean College of New Jersey in 1973, the institution earned university status on September 26, 1997, becoming Kean University of New Jersey. Kean University has subsequently grown to become the third largest institution of higher education in New Jersey and currently comprises five undergraduate colleges and the Nathan Weiss Graduate College. Kean University also hosts numerous research institutions, perhaps most prominently the New Jersey Center for Science, Technology and Mathematics, the Kean University Human Rights Institute, the Holocaust Recourse Center, the Wynona Moore Lipman Ethnic Studies Center, and Liberty Hall. In recent years Kean has expanded to a satellite campus in Toms River, New Jersey and is planning a foreign campus in the People's Republic of China.

Kean University was named a noteworthy College of the Year in 2001 by Time, and in 2008 was designated one of the five best diverse colleges in the nation by DiversityInc.
Logo Fordham University

Fordham University

New YorkBusinessHuman Resources, Social WorkLaw

Fordham University (FU) is a private, nonprofit, coeducational research university based in New York City, United States. It was founded by the Catholic Diocese of New York in 1841 as St. John's College, placed in the care of the Society of Jesus shortly thereafter, and has since become an independent institution under a lay board of trustees, which describes the university as "in the Jesuit tradition."

Fordham is composed of ten constituent colleges, four of which are for undergraduates and six of which are for postgraduates. It enrolls approximately 15,000 students across three campuses in New York State: Rose Hill in the Bronx, Lincoln Center in Manhattan, and Westchester in West Harrison. In addition to these campuses, the university maintains a study abroad center in the United Kingdom and field offices in Spain and South Africa. Fordham awards the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees, as well as various master's and doctoral degrees. The 2016 edition of U.S. News and World Report lists Fordham as a national university and ranks it 66th in this category. Its graduate programs in law, business, English, social work, and education are ranked among the best in the country.

Fordham Preparatory School, a four-year, all-male college preparatory school, was once integrated with the university and shares its founding. It became legally independent in 1972 and moved to its own facilities on the northwest corner of the Rose Hill campus; however, the school remains connected to the university in many ways.
Logo New York Institute of Technology

New York Institute of Technology

New YorkManagementArchitectureMedicine, General, Internal

New York Institute of Technology (also known as NYIT) is a private, independent, nonprofit, non-sectarian, coeducational research university. NYIT has five schools and two colleges, all with a strong emphasis on technology and applied scientific research: School of Architecture and Design, School of Education, School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, School of Health Professions, School of Management, College of Arts and Sciences and College of Osteopathic Medicine. The university has three New York campuses: one in Old Westbury, Nassau County, Long Island; one in Central Islip, Suffolk County, Long Island; and one near Columbus Circle in Manhattan. As well, it has several global campuses in: Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Nanjing, China; and Vancouver, Canada. NYIT offers many degree programs, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees, in more than 50 fields of study, including architecture and design; arts and sciences; education; engineering and computing sciences; health professions; management; and osteopathic medicine. NYIT awards the Bachelor of Architecture, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees, as well as various master's and doctoral degrees. NYIT has degree partnerships with over a dozen Chinese universities, as well as with universities in France, Taiwan, Brazil, and Turkey.

NYIT enrolls over 10,000 students across its campuses in New York State. NYIT students represent nearly all 50 U.S. states and 109 countries. NYIT consistently ranks in the "top 50" among U.S. universities in the north, as compiled by U.S. News & World Report.
Logo New Jersey Institute of Technology

New Jersey Institute of Technology

NewarkArchitecture

The New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is a public research university in the University Heights neighborhood of Newark, New Jersey. NJIT is New Jersey's Science & Technology University. Centrally located in the New York metropolitan area its campus is within walking distance of downtown Newark. New York City, 9 miles (14.5 km) and under 30 minutes away, is directly accessible from campus via public transit.

Founded in 1881 with the support of local industrialists and inventors, especially Edward Weston (334 US Patents), NJIT opened as Newark Technical School in 1884. Application oriented from inception the school grew into a classic engineering college – Newark College of Engineering (NCE) – and then, with the addition of a School of Architecture in 1973, into a polytechnic university that is now home to five colleges and one school.

NJIT opened with 88 students. As of fall 2014, the university enrolls more than 10,600 students, over 2,200 of whom live on campus. Architecturally significant buildings include Eberhardt Hall, the Campus Center, and the Central King Building – in the Collegiate Gothic style – which is being renovated into a STEM center. Planned facilities include a Wellness & Events Center that will house a 3,500-seat venue for social and sporting events.

NJIT offers 48 undergraduate (Bachelor of Science/Arts) majors and 78 graduate (Masters and PhD) programs. Via its Honors College it also offers professional degree programs in collaboration with nearby institutions. These include a program in medicine (M.D.) with New Jersey Medical School (Rutgers), and an accelerated engineering + law program (BS, JD) with Seton Hall Law School. An early leader in distance learning – it trademarked the term "Virtual Classroom" – NJIT offers a wide range of on-line courses and degrees.

The university is organized into 27 academic departments. Three departments, Biological Sciences, History, and Theater Arts, are federated with Rutgers-Newark whose campus borders NJIT's. With a student population that is almost 20% international NJIT consistently ranks among the 10 most ethnically diverse national universities in the country. It has multiple study abroad options along with extensive co-op, internship, and service opportunities. According to PayScale (2015–16) NJIT ranks 19th among Engineering Schools and 34th among Research Universities in the US by Salary Potential.

NJIT is categorized as a high research activity (RU/H) university by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Its NSF funding exceeded $107 million in 2013. Areas of focus include: applied mathematics, materials science, biomedical engineering, signal processing, transportation planning, and solar physics - the school operates the Big Bear Solar Observatory (optical) and the Owens Valley Solar Array (radio). NJIT's mission includes economic development; two examples of which are the Enterprise Development Center (EDC), an on-campus business incubator that houses over 90 start-ups, and the New Jersey Innovation Institute (NJII).

NJIT is Land-grant university. It is also a Sea-grant college, and a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. A leader in the graduate education of students that are underrepresented in STEM fields, it has participated in the McNair Scholars Program since 1999. The NJIT Highlanders (NCAA Division I) primarily compete in the Atlantic Sun Conference.
Logo The New School

The New School

New YorkHistoryEcology, Evolution, Environment

The New School is a university in New York City, United States, located mostly in Greenwich Village. From its founding in 1919 by progressive New York educators, and for most of its history, the university was known as The New School for Social Research. Between 1997 and 2005 it was known as New School University. The university and each of its colleges were renamed in 2005.

The university is renowned for its teaching and its open intellectual environment. It has also launched or housed a range of important institutions such as the international think tank World Policy Institute, the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, the India China Institute, the Observatory on Latin America, and the Center for New York City Affairs. It also hosts the annual National Book Awards. Parsons The New School for Design is the university's highly competitive art school.

Some 9,300 students are enrolled in graduate and undergraduate degree programs, organized into seven different schools, which teach a variety of disciplines, including the social sciences, liberal arts, humanities, architecture, fine arts, design, music, drama, finance, psychology and public policy.

The graduate school of The New School began in 1933 as the University in Exile, an emergency rescue program for threatened scholars in Europe. In 1934 it was chartered by the New York state board of regents and its name was changed to the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science, a name it would keep until 2005 when it was renamed New School for Social Research.
Logo New York University

New York University

NYU

New York

New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian American research university based in New York City. Founded in 1831, NYU is the largest private nonprofit institution of American higher education. NYU's main campus is located at Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. The University also established NYU Abu Dhabi, NYU Shanghai and maintains 11 other Global Academic Centers in Accra, Berlin, Buenos Aires, Florence, London, Madrid, Paris, Prague, Sydney, Tel Aviv and Washington, D.C.

NYU was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1950. NYU counts thirty-six Nobel Prize winners, four Abel Prize winners, over thirty National Medals for Science, Technology and Innovation, Arts and Humanities recipients, sixteen Pulitzer Prize winners, over thirty Academy Award winners, as well as several Russ Prize, Gordon Prize, Draper Prize and Turing Award winners, and dozens of Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. NYU also has MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering members among its past and present graduates and faculty. NYU has the most Oscar winners of any university.

NYU is organized into more than twenty schools, colleges, and institutes, located in six centers throughout Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn. According to the Institute of International Education, NYU sends more students to study abroad than any other US college or university, and the College Board reports more online searches by international students for "NYU" than for any other university.
Logo State University of New York at Purchase

State University of New York at Purchase

Port ChesterCultural StudiesFilm, Radio, TelevisionMusic

Purchase College, State University of New York, is a public four-year college located in Purchase, New York, United States. It is one of 13 comprehensive colleges in the State University of New York (SUNY) system. Founded by Governor Nelson Rockefeller in 1967 as "the cultural gem of the SUNY system," Purchase College claims to offer "a unique education that combines programs in the liberal arts with conservatory programs in the arts in ways that emphasize inquiry, mastery of skills, and creativity." Purchase College was ranked 9 in U.S. News & World Report's 2014 listing of top public liberal arts colleges. The college was listed as one of Kiplinger's 100 Best Public College Values in 2014. It was also listed in that publication's 2014 list of Best Values in Small Colleges. The Princeton Review included Purchase College in its 2015 list of The Best 379 Colleges.

Purchase College confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Science (BS), Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Bachelor of Music (MusB), Master of Arts (MA), Master of Fine Arts (MFA), and Master of Music (MM). As a requirement for the BA and BS degree, students undertake a senior project in which they devote two semesters to an in-depth, original, and creative study under the close supervision of a faculty mentor. Similarly, the BFA and MusB studies culminate in a senior exhibition, film, or recital. Master's degree programs culminate in a thesis and the MFA and MM culminate in an exhibition, recital, or related presentation.
Logo The New School

The New School

New YorkHistory Ecology, Evolution, Environment

The New School is a university in New York City, United States, located mostly in Greenwich Village. From its founding in 1919 by progressive New York educators, and for most of its history, the university was known as The New School for Social Research. Between 1997 and 2005 it was known as New School University. The university and each of its colleges were renamed in 2005.

The university is renowned for its teaching and its open intellectual environment. It has also launched or housed a range of important institutions such as the international think tank World Policy Institute, the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, the India China Institute, the Observatory on Latin America, and the Center for New York City Affairs. It also hosts the annual National Book Awards. Parsons The New School for Design is the university's highly competitive art school.

Some 9,300 students are enrolled in graduate and undergraduate degree programs, organized into seven different schools, which teach a variety of disciplines, including the social sciences, liberal arts, humanities, architecture, fine arts, design, music, drama, finance, psychology and public policy.

The graduate school of The New School began in 1933 as the University in Exile, an emergency rescue program for threatened scholars in Europe. In 1934 it was chartered by the New York state board of regents and its name was changed to the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science, a name it would keep until 2005 when it was renamed New School for Social Research.
Logo St. Francis College

St. Francis College

Audit, AccountingManagementPsychologyUrban StudiesEcology, Evolution, Environment

St. Francis College, often referred to as St. Francis or SFC, is a private, coeducational college located in Brooklyn Heights, New York, in the United States. The campus comprises five interconnected buildings, occupying half of a city block in Downtown Brooklyn. It was founded in 1859 by friars of the Order of Servant Franciscans, a Franciscan order, as the St. Francis Academy and was the first private school in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn. St. Francis College began as a parochial all-boys academy in the City of Brooklyn and has transformed into a small liberal arts college that has 19 academic departments which offer 72 majors and minors.

St. Francis College is a predominantly undergraduate institution, yet does have graduate programs in accounting, project management and psychology. St. Francis has been ranked nationally and regionally by Forbes magazine, Washington Monthly, Money magazine and U.S. News & World Report as one of the top baccalaureate colleges. St. Francis is set in an urban environment and is considered a commuter college. As of 2014, there are 2,764 undergraduates (11% part-time) and 55 graduates (45% part-time). The student to faculty ratio is 18:1 and 46.8% of classes have 20 or fewer students. The 2,900 students that attend St. Francis College come from over 80 countries. St. Francis College has been ranked by the New York Times and Forbes as one of the more diverse colleges in the United States.

SFC has 19 athletic teams that compete in Division I of the NCAA and are known as the Terriers and Lady Terriers for the men's and women's teams, respectively. SFC's teams participate in the Northeast Conference, with the exception of the men's and women's water polo teams which compete in the CWPA and the MAAC, respectively.
Logo Drew University

Drew University

MadisonBank, InsuranceUrban StudiesLanguages, Philology, Linguistic StudiesLiteratureTheology, Religion

Drew University is a coeducational private university located in Madison, New Jersey, in the United States. Drew has been nicknamed the "University in the Forest" because of the serenity of its wooded 186-acre campus (753,000 m2) when compared to the busy suburban area surrounding the school. As of 2015, 2,113 students are pursuing degrees at the university's three schools. Undergraduate tuition for the 2015-2016 academic year was US$59,661 (excluding books, personal expenditures, and health insurance), making Drew among the most expensive universities in New Jersey.

In 1867, financier and railroad tycoon Daniel Drew purchased an estate in Madison to establish a theological seminary to train candidates for ministry in the Methodist church. The seminary later expanded to offer an undergraduate liberal arts curriculum in 1928 and graduate studies in 1955. The College of Liberal Arts, serving 1,417 undergraduate students, offers strong concentrations in the natural sciences, social sciences, languages and literatures, humanities and the arts and in several interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary fields. The Drew Theological School, the third-oldest of thirteen Methodist seminaries affiliated with the United Methodist Church, currently enrolls 436 students preparing for careers in the ministry and the academic study of theology. The Caspersen School of Graduate Studies, enrolling 351 graduate students, offers masters and doctoral degrees in a variety of specialized and interdisciplinary fields.

While affiliated with the Methodist faith, Drew University makes no religious demands of its students. While many of the Theological School's students and faculty are United Methodist, students of all faiths are admitted to study. The United Methodist Church's General Commission on Archives and History is located on campus and maintains an archive of Methodist records and artifacts from the nineteenth century to the present.
Logo SUNY Downstate Medical Center

SUNY Downstate Medical Center

Medicine, General, InternalBiology, Biochemistry, BiotechnologyNursing

SUNY Downstate Medical Center, located in central Brooklyn, New York, is the only academic medical center for health education, research, and patient care serving Brooklyn’s 2.5 million residents. As of Fall 2011, it had a total student body of 1,738 and approximately 8,000 faculty and staff.

Downstate Medical Center comprises a College of Medicine, Colleges of Nursing and Health Related Professions, Schools of Graduate Studies and Public Health, and University Hospital of Brooklyn. It also includes a major research complex and biotechnology facilities.

SUNY Downstate ranks eighth nationally in the number of alumni who are on the faculty of American medical schools. More physicians practicing in New York City graduated from Downstate than from any other medical school. With 1,040 residents (young physicians in training), Downstate's residency program is the 16th largest in the country.

SUNY Downstate Medical Center is the fourth largest employer in Brooklyn. Eighty-six percent of its employees are New York City residents; 68 percent live in Brooklyn. The medical center's total direct, indirect, and induced economic impact on New York State is in excess of $2 billion. SUNY Downstate Medical Center attracted close to $60 million in external research funding in 2011, which includes $26 million from federal sources. It ranks fourth among SUNY campuses in grant expenditures, and second among SUNY's academic health centers.
Logo New York University

New York University

NYU

New York

New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian American research university based in New York City. Founded in 1831, NYU is the largest private nonprofit institution of American higher education. NYU's main campus is located at Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. The University also established NYU Abu Dhabi, NYU Shanghai and maintains 11 other Global Academic Centers in Accra, Berlin, Buenos Aires, Florence, London, Madrid, Paris, Prague, Sydney, Tel Aviv and Washington, D.C.

NYU was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1950. NYU counts thirty-six Nobel Prize winners, four Abel Prize winners, over thirty National Medals for Science, Technology and Innovation, Arts and Humanities recipients, sixteen Pulitzer Prize winners, over thirty Academy Award winners, as well as several Russ Prize, Gordon Prize, Draper Prize and Turing Award winners, and dozens of Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. NYU also has MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering members among its past and present graduates and faculty. NYU has the most Oscar winners of any university.

NYU is organized into more than twenty schools, colleges, and institutes, located in six centers throughout Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn. According to the Institute of International Education, NYU sends more students to study abroad than any other US college or university, and the College Board reports more online searches by international students for "NYU" than for any other university.

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