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Logo University of London

University of London

London

The University of London (informally referred to as London University) is a collegiate research university located in London, England, consisting of 18 constituent colleges, 10 research institutes and a number of central bodies.

The university is the second largest university by number of full-time students in the United Kingdom, with around 135,000 campus-based students and over 50,000 distance learning students in the University of London International Programmes. The university was established by Royal Charter in 1836, as a degree-awarding examination board for students holding certificates from London University (UCL) and King's College, London and "other such other Institutions, corporate or unincorporated, as shall be established for the purpose of Education, whether within the Metropolis or elsewhere within our United Kingdom". The university moved to a federal structure in 1900.

For most practical purposes, ranging from admissions to funding, the constituent colleges operate on a semi-independent basis, with some recently obtaining the power to award their own degrees whilst remaining in the federal university. The nine largest colleges of the university are King's College London; University College London; Birkbeck; Goldsmiths; the London Business School; Queen Mary; Royal Holloway; SOAS; and the London School of Economics and Political Science. The specialist colleges of the university include Heythrop College, specialising in philosophy and theology, and St George's, specialising in medicine. Imperial College London was formerly a member before it left the University of London in 2007. On the 16th July 2015 it was announced that City University London would join the federal University of London, becoming one of its constituent colleges from August 2016.

Many notable individuals have passed through the university, either as staff or students, including at least 4 monarchs, 52 presidents or prime ministers, 74 Nobel laureates, 6 Grammy winners, 2 Oscar winners and 3 Olympic gold medalists.

In post-nominals, the University of London is commonly abbreviated as Lond. or, more rarely, Londin., from the Latin Universitas Londiniensis after their degree abbreviations.
Logo University College London

University College London

LondonTheology, ReligionNeurosciences, NeurologyPharmacology, Pharmacy

University College London (UCL) is a public research university in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Recognised as one of the most prestigious multidisciplinary research universities in the world, UCL is the largest higher education institution in London and the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment.

Founded in 1826 as London University, UCL was the first university institution established in London and the earliest in England to be entirely secular, to admit students regardless of their religion, and to admit women on equal terms with men. The philosopher Jeremy Bentham is commonly regarded as the spiritual father of UCL, as his radical ideas on education and society were the inspiration to its founders, although his direct involvement in its foundation was limited. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with the Institute of Neurology (in 1997), the Eastman Dental Institute (in 1999), the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (in 1999), the School of Pharmacy (in 2012) and the Institute of Education (in 2014).

UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals elsewhere in central London, and satellite campuses in Adelaide, Australia and Doha, Qatar. UCL is organised into 11 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL is responsible for several museums and collections in a wide range of fields, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology and the Grant Museum of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. UCL has around 36,000 students and 11,000 staff (including around 6,000 academic staff and 980 professors) and had a total income of £1.02 billion in 2013/14, of which £374.5 million was from research grants and contracts. UCL is a member of numerous academic organisations and is part of UCL Partners, the world's largest academic health science centre, and the 'golden triangle' of British universities.

UCL is one of the most selective British universities and ranks highly in national and international league tables. UCL's graduates are ranked among the most employable by international employers and its alumni include the "Father of the Nation" of each of India, Kenya and Mauritius, founders of Ghana, modern Japan and Nigeria, the inventor of the telephone, and one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA. UCL faculties have contributed to major advances in several disciplines; all five of the naturally-occurring noble gases were discovered at UCL by William Ramsay, the vacuum tube was invented by UCL graduate John Ambrose Fleming while a faculty of UCL and several foundational advances in modern statistics were made at UCL's statistical science department founded by Karl Pearson. There are 32 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists amongst UCL's alumni and current and former staff.
Logo King's College London

King's College London

LondonMedicine, General, InternalNursingPsychiatry

King's College London (informally King's or KCL; formerly styled King's College, London) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious universities, forming a part of the academic 'golden triangle' of highly research intensive and elite southern English universities.

King's was founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829 and received its royal charter in the same year, making it arguably the third-oldest university in England. St Thomas' Hospital, which is now a teaching hospital of King's College London School of Medicine, the Europe's largest healthcare training facility, which has roots dating back to 1173 with its medical school established in 1550. King's became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with Queen Elizabeth College and Chelsea College of Science and Technology (in 1985), the Institute of Psychiatry (in 1997), and the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals and Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery (in 1998).

King's has its main campus on the Strand in central London, and has three other Thames-side campuses and another in Denmark Hill in south London. Its academic activities are organised into nine faculties which are subdivided into numerous departments, centres and research divisions. King's is the largest centre for graduate and post-graduate medical teaching and biomedical research in Europe; it is home to six Medical Research Council centres and is a founding member of the King's Health Partners academic health sciences centre. It is a member of numerous academic organisations, including the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association and the Russell Group. King's has around 25,000 students and 6,113 staff and had a total income of £604 million in 2013/14, of which £172 million was from research grants and contracts.

King's is known for its several noted alumni and staff, including 12 Nobel Prize laureates amongst King's alumni and current and former faculty. The university performs highly in international rankings, in 2015 it ranked 19th in the world (5th in the UK and 7th in Europe) in the QS World University Rankings, and 40th in the world (7th in the UK and 10th in Europe) in the 2014 Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In rankings produced by Times Higher Education based upon the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, King's was ranked 6th overall for "research power" and 7th for GPA. In a survey by The New York Times assessing the most valued graduates by business leaders, King's College London graduates ranked 22nd in the world and 5th in the UK. In the 2014 Global Employability University Survey of international recruiters King's is ranked 35th in the world and 7th in the UK.
Logo University of Hertfordshire

University of Hertfordshire

HatfieldAerospaceAstronomy, AstrophysicsBusinessArchitectureHistoryPharmacology, Pharmacy

The University of Hertfordshire is a public research university in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. The university is based largely in Hatfield, Hertfordshire. Its antecedent institution, Hatfield Technical College, was founded in 1952 and was identified as one of 25 Colleges of Technology in the United Kingdom in 1959. In 1992, Hatfield Polytechnic was granted university status by the British government and subsequently renamed University of Hertfordshire. From the time it was awarded university status, Hertfordshire's enrolment has steadily increased. As of 2013, it has 25,130 students and 2,358 staff, 812 of which are academic members of staff. It has more than 5,200 international students and a global network of more than 160,000 alumni. Hertfordshire is a member of Association of Commonwealth Universities and University Alliance. The university has an annual turnover of £234m.

The University's academic activities are organised into 11 schools, within which there are around 50 academic departments and 24 research centres. The university has a unique history in training aerospace engineers. The university offers courses in architecture, astronomy, business, computing, education, engineering, humanities, natural sciences, pharmacy and social sciences. Hertfordshire is recognised as internationally excellent and world leading for research in the field of History.

The University of Hertfordshire is recognised as one Hertfordshire's largest employers with over 2,700 staff and a turnover of more than £235 million. With a student community of over 24,500 including more than 2,000 international students. The university exhibits an international character with 85 countries represented in its student body. It also has a global network of over 165,000 alumni. It has good transport links to the rest of the UK, with London only 25 minutes by train, and the University's own bus company providing student transport.

The University of Hertfordshire is recognised for its excellent teaching and focus on employability of its graduates. It takes a flexible approach to learning, teaching and research, offering e-learning and part-time study options. The creative and entrepreneurial environment is enhanced by close links with business and professions, providing great opportunities for work placements and travel.
Logo Queen Mary University of London

Queen Mary University of London

London

Queen Mary University of London (officially abbreviated to QMUL, informally known as QM) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. With roots dating back to the founding of the London Hospital Medical College in 1785, Queen Mary College was admitted to the University of London in 1915, named after Mary of Teck, Queen of the United Kingdom. In 1989 Queen Mary College merged with Westfield College to form Queen Mary and Westfield College. In 1995, Queen Mary and Westfield College merged with two distinguished medical colleges, St Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College, established in 1843, and the London Hospital Medical College, England's first medical school, founded in 1785. It is recognised as one of the most prestigious universities in London.

Queen Mary is frequently ranked among the top universities in the UK, Europe and is among the top 100 universities in the world. It was recently ranked among the top 5 universities in London. There are six Nobel Laureates amongst Queen Mary's alumni and current and former staff.

Queen Mary's main campus is located in the Mile End area of the East End of London, with other campuses in Holborn, Smithfield and Whitechapel. It has around 17,000 full-time students and 4,000 staff. Queen Mary is organised into three faculties – the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Faculty of Science and Engineering and Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry – within which there are 21 academic departments and institutes. It is one of the largest colleges of the University of London.

Queen Mary is a member of the Russell Group of leading British research universities, the Association of Commonwealth Universities and Universities UK. Queen Mary is a major centre for medical teaching and research and is part of UCL Partners, the world's largest academic health science centre. It has a strategic partnership with the University of Warwick, including research collaboration and joint teaching of English, history and computer science undergraduates. Queen Mary also collaborates with Royal Holloway, University of London to run programmes at the University of London Institute in Paris.
Logo City University London

City University London

LondonLawBusiness

City University London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom. It was founded in 1894 as the Northampton Institute and became a university when The City University was created by Royal Charter in 1966. The Inns of Court School of Law, which merged with City University in 2001, was established in 1852, making it the university's oldest constituent part.

City University has its main campus in the Islington area of central London, with additional campuses in the City of London and the Holborn, Smithfield and Whitechapel areas of London. It is organised into seven Schools, within which there are around 40 academic departments and centres, including the City University Department of Journalism, the Cass Business School and the Inns of Court School of Law (part of the City Law School).

City University had a total income of £178.6 million in 2010/11, of which £8 million was from research grants and contracts. Cass Business school is ranked 2nd in London and top 40 in the world. In 2015 it was ranked 301st in the world according to the QS World University Rankings and is included in Times Higher Education's list of the top 100 universities in the world under 50 years old. City University is a member of the Association of MBAs, EQUIS and Universities UK.

On the 16th July 2015 it was announced that City University would join the federal University of London, becoming one of its constituent colleges from August 2016.
Logo Imperial College London

Imperial College London

LondonBusinessMedicine, General, Internal

Imperial College London is a public research university, located in London, United Kingdom. The university specialises in fields of science, engineering, medicine and business and is considered to be one of the most prestigious science-based universities in the world.

The Imperial College of Science and Technology was founded in 1907, as a constituent college of the federal University of London, by merging the City and Guilds College, the Royal School of Mines and the Royal College of Science. The college grew through mergers including with St Mary's Hospital Medical School, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, the Royal Postgraduate Medical School and the National Heart and Lung Institute to be known as The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine. The college established the Imperial College Business School in 2005, thus covering subjects in science, engineering, medicine and business. Imperial College London became an independent university in 2007 during its centennial celebration.

Imperial is organised into four faculties of science, engineering, medicine and business. The main campus is located in South Kensington with other campuses located elsewhere in London, with a major expansion currently underway in White City. The university is a major biomedical research centre and formed the first academic health science centre in the United Kingdom. Imperial has about 15000 students, and about 8000 staff members. Imperial is a member of the Russell Group, G5, Association of Commonwealth Universities, League of European Research Universities, and the "Golden Triangle" of British universities.

Imperial is consistently included among the top universities in the world. According to The New York Times, recruiters consider its students among the 10 most valued graduates in the world. Imperial faculty and alumni include 15 Nobel laureates, 2 Fields Medalists, 70 Fellows of the Royal Society, 82 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 78 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences.
Logo Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London

Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London

LondonMedicine, General, Internal

Logo Imperial College London

Imperial College London

LondonBusiness Medicine, General, Internal

Imperial College London is a public research university, located in London, United Kingdom. The university specialises in fields of science, engineering, medicine and business and is considered to be one of the most prestigious science-based universities in the world.

The Imperial College of Science and Technology was founded in 1907, as a constituent college of the federal University of London, by merging the City and Guilds College, the Royal School of Mines and the Royal College of Science. The college grew through mergers including with St Mary's Hospital Medical School, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, the Royal Postgraduate Medical School and the National Heart and Lung Institute to be known as The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine. The college established the Imperial College Business School in 2005, thus covering subjects in science, engineering, medicine and business. Imperial College London became an independent university in 2007 during its centennial celebration.

Imperial is organised into four faculties of science, engineering, medicine and business. The main campus is located in South Kensington with other campuses located elsewhere in London, with a major expansion currently underway in White City. The university is a major biomedical research centre and formed the first academic health science centre in the United Kingdom. Imperial has about 15000 students, and about 8000 staff members. Imperial is a member of the Russell Group, G5, Association of Commonwealth Universities, League of European Research Universities, and the "Golden Triangle" of British universities.

Imperial is consistently included among the top universities in the world. According to The New York Times, recruiters consider its students among the 10 most valued graduates in the world. Imperial faculty and alumni include 15 Nobel laureates, 2 Fields Medalists, 70 Fellows of the Royal Society, 82 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 78 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences.
Logo London School of Economics

London School of Economics

LondonEconomicsPolitical ScienceMathematics, Statistics, FinanceDecision Support, StatisticsHistoryPhilosophy

The London School of Economics and Political Science (commonly referred to as the London School of Economics or LSE) is a public research university located in London, England which specialises in social sciences, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. LSE is considered to be one of the most prestigious and selective social science institutions in the world.

Founded in 1895 by Fabian Society members Sidney Webb, 1st Baron Passfield, Beatrice Webb, Graham Wallas and George Bernard Shaw for the betterment of society, LSE joined the University of London in 1900 and first issued degrees to its students in 1902. Despite its name, LSE conducts teaching and research across a range of social sciences, as well as in mathematics, statistics, media, philosophy and history.

LSE is located in Westminster, central London, near the boundary between Covent Garden and Holborn. The area is historically known as Clare Market. It has around 9,500 full-time students and just over 3,000 staff and had a total income of £263.2 million in 2012/13, of which £23.7 million was from research grants. The School is organised into 24 academic departments and 20 research centres. LSE forms a part of the academic golden triangle of highly research intensive southern English universities.

LSE is consistently ranked as one of the best universities in the world with excellence in a wide range of subjects. According to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, the School has the highest proportion of world-leading research among all British universities. The School has produced many notable alumni in the fields of law, economics, philosophy, history, business, literature, media and politics. Around 45 past or present presidents and prime ministers have studied or taught at LSE, and 28 members of the current British House of Commons and 46 members of the current House of Lords have either studied or taught at the School. To date, 26% (or 12 out of 46) of all the Nobel Prizes in Economics have been awarded to LSE alumni and current and former staff. Out of all European universities, LSE has educated the most billionaires according to a 2014 global census of dollar billionaires. Notable businesspeople who studied at LSE include George Soros and David Rockefeller.
Logo Royal Holloway, University of London

Royal Holloway, University of London

EghamUrban Studies

Royal Holloway, University of London, formally incorporated as Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, is a public research university and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It has three faculties, 19 academic departments and c. 8,600 undergraduate and postgraduate students from over 100 countries. The campus is just west of Egham, Surrey, within the Greater London Urban Area, although outside the M25 motorway and c. 19 miles (31 km) from the geographic centre of London.

The Egham campus was founded in 1879 by the Victorian entrepreneur and philanthropist Thomas Holloway. Royal Holloway College was officially opened in 1886 by Queen Victoria as an all-women college. It became a member of the University of London in 1900. In 1945, the college admitted male postgraduate students, and in 1965, around 100 of the first male undergraduates. In 1985, Royal Holloway merged with Bedford College (another former all-women's college in London, which was founded in 1849 and, like Royal Holloway, joined the University of London in 1900 and became fully co-educational in 1965). The merged college was named Royal Holloway and Bedford New College (RHBNC), this remaining the official registered name of the college by Act of Parliament. The campus is dominated by the Founder's Building, a Grade I listed red-brick building modelled on the Château de Chambord in the Loire Valley, France.

Royal Holloway is ranked 17th in the UK and 118th in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for 2014–15. The guide has described Royal Holloway as "truly world class". Royal Holloway is ranked in 6th place in the world (1st in the UK) in the category of "International Outlook", recognising its broader outlook as a global university. The rankings use three separate indicators to judge "international outlook"—proportion of international staff and students, and research in terms of papers that are co-authored with at least one international partner.

Royal Holloway is highly rated for the wide-reaching impact of its research, scoring 98.9 per cent for citations (first in the UK), further cementing Royal Holloway’s status as one of the world’s premier research institutions. It is particularly strong in arts and humanities. Admission into courses in English, Creative Writing, Psychology and Music are very competitive with a 9:1 applicants to place ratio. Royal Holloway's degree courses in Information Security, Physics, International Relations, Earth Sciences, and Media Arts are also particularly strong, frequently ranking in the top 10 of national subject rankings. There are strong links and exchange programmes with leading institutions in the United States, Canada, and Hong Kong, notably Yale University, the University of Toronto, and the University of Hong Kong.
Logo Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry

LondonDentistry, Oral SurgeryMedicine, General, Internal

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry is a medical and dental school. The school was formed in 1995 by the merger of the London Hospital Medical College (the first school to be granted an official charter for medical teaching in 1785) and the Medical College of St Bartholomew's Hospital (the oldest remaining hospital in the United Kingdom, having been founded in 1123, with medical teaching beginning from that date) and Queen Mary and Westfield College.

The school exists on two main sites, having a presence at the site of both of the former colleges at and near their respective hospitals, St Bartholomew's Hospital (in Smithfield, City of London and nearby in Charterhouse Square), and the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, Tower Hamlets with an additional site at Queen Mary's main (Mile End) campus. A new building (Blizard Building), named after the founder of The London Hospital Medical College, Sir William Blizard, was recently completed at the Royal London site, and houses research laboratories and is the main site for medical undergraduate teaching.

In the 2008 government Research Assessment Exercise, the school was ranked first for the quality of its medical research in London and fourth overall nationally; the dental school was ranked joint first. As of 2008 the school accepted 277 British medical students per annum and an additional 17 from overseas, making it one of the largest medical schools in the United Kingdom. The medical school is part of Queen Mary University of London, a constituent college of the federal University of London, and a member of the United Hospitals.
Logo University of London

University of London

London

The University of London (informally referred to as London University) is a collegiate research university located in London, England, consisting of 18 constituent colleges, 10 research institutes and a number of central bodies.

The university is the second largest university by number of full-time students in the United Kingdom, with around 135,000 campus-based students and over 50,000 distance learning students in the University of London International Programmes. The university was established by Royal Charter in 1836, as a degree-awarding examination board for students holding certificates from London University (UCL) and King's College, London and "other such other Institutions, corporate or unincorporated, as shall be established for the purpose of Education, whether within the Metropolis or elsewhere within our United Kingdom". The university moved to a federal structure in 1900.

For most practical purposes, ranging from admissions to funding, the constituent colleges operate on a semi-independent basis, with some recently obtaining the power to award their own degrees whilst remaining in the federal university. The nine largest colleges of the university are King's College London; University College London; Birkbeck; Goldsmiths; the London Business School; Queen Mary; Royal Holloway; SOAS; and the London School of Economics and Political Science. The specialist colleges of the university include Heythrop College, specialising in philosophy and theology, and St George's, specialising in medicine. Imperial College London was formerly a member before it left the University of London in 2007. On the 16th July 2015 it was announced that City University London would join the federal University of London, becoming one of its constituent colleges from August 2016.

Many notable individuals have passed through the university, either as staff or students, including at least 4 monarchs, 52 presidents or prime ministers, 74 Nobel laureates, 6 Grammy winners, 2 Oscar winners and 3 Olympic gold medalists.

In post-nominals, the University of London is commonly abbreviated as Lond. or, more rarely, Londin., from the Latin Universitas Londiniensis after their degree abbreviations.
Logo University College London

University College London

LondonTheology, Religion Neurosciences, Neurology Pharmacology, Pharmacy

University College London (UCL) is a public research university in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Recognised as one of the most prestigious multidisciplinary research universities in the world, UCL is the largest higher education institution in London and the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment.

Founded in 1826 as London University, UCL was the first university institution established in London and the earliest in England to be entirely secular, to admit students regardless of their religion, and to admit women on equal terms with men. The philosopher Jeremy Bentham is commonly regarded as the spiritual father of UCL, as his radical ideas on education and society were the inspiration to its founders, although his direct involvement in its foundation was limited. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with the Institute of Neurology (in 1997), the Eastman Dental Institute (in 1999), the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (in 1999), the School of Pharmacy (in 2012) and the Institute of Education (in 2014).

UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals elsewhere in central London, and satellite campuses in Adelaide, Australia and Doha, Qatar. UCL is organised into 11 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL is responsible for several museums and collections in a wide range of fields, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology and the Grant Museum of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. UCL has around 36,000 students and 11,000 staff (including around 6,000 academic staff and 980 professors) and had a total income of £1.02 billion in 2013/14, of which £374.5 million was from research grants and contracts. UCL is a member of numerous academic organisations and is part of UCL Partners, the world's largest academic health science centre, and the 'golden triangle' of British universities.

UCL is one of the most selective British universities and ranks highly in national and international league tables. UCL's graduates are ranked among the most employable by international employers and its alumni include the "Father of the Nation" of each of India, Kenya and Mauritius, founders of Ghana, modern Japan and Nigeria, the inventor of the telephone, and one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA. UCL faculties have contributed to major advances in several disciplines; all five of the naturally-occurring noble gases were discovered at UCL by William Ramsay, the vacuum tube was invented by UCL graduate John Ambrose Fleming while a faculty of UCL and several foundational advances in modern statistics were made at UCL's statistical science department founded by Karl Pearson. There are 32 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists amongst UCL's alumni and current and former staff.
Logo King's College London

King's College London

LondonMedicine, General, Internal Nursing Psychiatry

King's College London (informally King's or KCL; formerly styled King's College, London) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious universities, forming a part of the academic 'golden triangle' of highly research intensive and elite southern English universities.

King's was founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829 and received its royal charter in the same year, making it arguably the third-oldest university in England. St Thomas' Hospital, which is now a teaching hospital of King's College London School of Medicine, the Europe's largest healthcare training facility, which has roots dating back to 1173 with its medical school established in 1550. King's became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with Queen Elizabeth College and Chelsea College of Science and Technology (in 1985), the Institute of Psychiatry (in 1997), and the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals and Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery (in 1998).

King's has its main campus on the Strand in central London, and has three other Thames-side campuses and another in Denmark Hill in south London. Its academic activities are organised into nine faculties which are subdivided into numerous departments, centres and research divisions. King's is the largest centre for graduate and post-graduate medical teaching and biomedical research in Europe; it is home to six Medical Research Council centres and is a founding member of the King's Health Partners academic health sciences centre. It is a member of numerous academic organisations, including the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association and the Russell Group. King's has around 25,000 students and 6,113 staff and had a total income of £604 million in 2013/14, of which £172 million was from research grants and contracts.

King's is known for its several noted alumni and staff, including 12 Nobel Prize laureates amongst King's alumni and current and former faculty. The university performs highly in international rankings, in 2015 it ranked 19th in the world (5th in the UK and 7th in Europe) in the QS World University Rankings, and 40th in the world (7th in the UK and 10th in Europe) in the 2014 Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In rankings produced by Times Higher Education based upon the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, King's was ranked 6th overall for "research power" and 7th for GPA. In a survey by The New York Times assessing the most valued graduates by business leaders, King's College London graduates ranked 22nd in the world and 5th in the UK. In the 2014 Global Employability University Survey of international recruiters King's is ranked 35th in the world and 7th in the UK.
Logo Heythrop College, University of London

Heythrop College, University of London

LondonPhilosophyTheology, Religion

Heythrop College, University of London, is a public university and the specialist philosophy and theology college of the University of London located in Kensington in London and is the oldest constituent college of the federal University of London, being founded in 1614 by the Society of Jesus. Heythrop joined the University of London in 1971, maintaining its Catholic links and ethos whilst offering an educational experience that respects all faiths and perspectives. Heythrop is a centre for inter-religious dialogue and modern philosophical inquiry and is a member of the Cathedrals Group of British colleges and universities.

Heythrop is situated on London's Kensington Square, whilst also having access to University of London facilities, such as Senate House and its extensive library. The college has three main departments offering undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in philosophy, theology and related social sciences as well as five specialist institutes and centres that promote and research in their specific field.

Heythrop has a total student population of 800, allowing one-to-one tutorship with its academic staff, one of the few institutions outside of Oxford or Cambridge to do so in the United Kingdom. The college is also widely regarded as being home to one of the largest philosophy and theology related libraries in Britain. The college is a registered charity under English law.

In June 2015 the Governing Body concluded that the College in its current form, as a constituent college of the University of London, will come to an end in 2018.
Logo University College London

University College London

LondonTheology, Religion Neurosciences, Neurology Pharmacology, Pharmacy

University College London (UCL) is a public research university in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Recognised as one of the most prestigious multidisciplinary research universities in the world, UCL is the largest higher education institution in London and the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment.

Founded in 1826 as London University, UCL was the first university institution established in London and the earliest in England to be entirely secular, to admit students regardless of their religion, and to admit women on equal terms with men. The philosopher Jeremy Bentham is commonly regarded as the spiritual father of UCL, as his radical ideas on education and society were the inspiration to its founders, although his direct involvement in its foundation was limited. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. It has grown through mergers, including with the Institute of Neurology (in 1997), the Eastman Dental Institute (in 1999), the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (in 1999), the School of Pharmacy (in 2012) and the Institute of Education (in 2014).

UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals elsewhere in central London, and satellite campuses in Adelaide, Australia and Doha, Qatar. UCL is organised into 11 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL is responsible for several museums and collections in a wide range of fields, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology and the Grant Museum of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. UCL has around 36,000 students and 11,000 staff (including around 6,000 academic staff and 980 professors) and had a total income of £1.02 billion in 2013/14, of which £374.5 million was from research grants and contracts. UCL is a member of numerous academic organisations and is part of UCL Partners, the world's largest academic health science centre, and the 'golden triangle' of British universities.

UCL is one of the most selective British universities and ranks highly in national and international league tables. UCL's graduates are ranked among the most employable by international employers and its alumni include the "Father of the Nation" of each of India, Kenya and Mauritius, founders of Ghana, modern Japan and Nigeria, the inventor of the telephone, and one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA. UCL faculties have contributed to major advances in several disciplines; all five of the naturally-occurring noble gases were discovered at UCL by William Ramsay, the vacuum tube was invented by UCL graduate John Ambrose Fleming while a faculty of UCL and several foundational advances in modern statistics were made at UCL's statistical science department founded by Karl Pearson. There are 32 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists amongst UCL's alumni and current and former staff.
Logo City University London

City University London

LondonLaw Business

City University London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom. It was founded in 1894 as the Northampton Institute and became a university when The City University was created by Royal Charter in 1966. The Inns of Court School of Law, which merged with City University in 2001, was established in 1852, making it the university's oldest constituent part.

City University has its main campus in the Islington area of central London, with additional campuses in the City of London and the Holborn, Smithfield and Whitechapel areas of London. It is organised into seven Schools, within which there are around 40 academic departments and centres, including the City University Department of Journalism, the Cass Business School and the Inns of Court School of Law (part of the City Law School).

City University had a total income of £178.6 million in 2010/11, of which £8 million was from research grants and contracts. Cass Business school is ranked 2nd in London and top 40 in the world. In 2015 it was ranked 301st in the world according to the QS World University Rankings and is included in Times Higher Education's list of the top 100 universities in the world under 50 years old. City University is a member of the Association of MBAs, EQUIS and Universities UK.

On the 16th July 2015 it was announced that City University would join the federal University of London, becoming one of its constituent colleges from August 2016.
Logo Institute of Cancer Research

Institute of Cancer Research

SuttonOncologyMedicine, General, Internal

The Institute of Cancer Research (the ICR) is a public research institute and university located in London, United Kingdom, specialised in oncology, and a constituent college of the University of London. It was founded in 1909 as a research department of the Royal Marsden Hospital and joined the University of London in 2003. It has been responsible for a number of breakthrough discoveries, including that the basic cause of cancer is damage to DNA.

The ICR occupies two sites, one in Chelsea, Central London and one in Sutton, southwest London, and had a total income of £96.4 million in 2012/13, of which £52.3 million was from peer-reviewed research grant awards. The ICR provides both taught postgraduate degree programmes and research degrees and currently has around 340 students. Together with the Royal Marsden Hospital the ICR forms the largest comprehensive cancer centre in Europe, and was ranked first amongst all British higher education institutions in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework Table of Excellence. In clinical medicine, 83% and in biological sciences, 96% of the ICR’s academic research was assessed to be world leading or internationally excellent (4* or 3*).

The ICR receives its external grant funding from the government body the Higher Education Funding Council for England, from government research council bodies and from charities including the Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK, Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research. It also receives voluntary income from legacies and from public and corporate donations. It runs the Everyman Campaign fundraising appeal, which raises awareness of male cancers and funds research into testicular and prostate cancer at the Everyman Centre, which is based at the ICR.

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