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Logo Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine

Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine

Fort WorthMedicine, General, Internal

Logo University of North Texas Health Science Center

University of North Texas Health Science Center

Fort WorthCultural StudiesMedicine, General, InternalPharmacology, Pharmacy

The University of North Texas Health Science Center, commonly known as the UNT Health Science Center and abbreviated UNTHSC, is a graduate-level institution of the University of North Texas System. The 2,243-student, 33-acre campus opened in 1970 and is located in the Cultural District of Fort Worth, Texas.

The UNT Health Science Center comprises the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM), the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the School of Public Health, the School of Health Professions, the UNT System College of Pharmacy, plus other centers and institutes.

UNT Health at UNTHSC is the TCOM faculty practice program providing direct patient care. UNT Health handles over 600,000 patient visits annually. The group's 230 physicians practice in 40 medical and surgical specialties and subspecialties, including allergy/immunology, family practice, cardiology, neurology, obstetrics & gynecology, oncology, orthopedics, psychiatry, sports medicine and neurosurgery.

Research centers and institutes at UNTSHC include the Cardiovascular Research Institute (CRI), the Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technologies (CCFT), the Focused on Resources for her Health Education and Research (FOR HER), the Institute for Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Research (IAADR), the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR), the Institute of Applied Genetics (IAG), the North Texas Eye Research Institute (NTERI), the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC), the Texas Prevention Institute (TPI), the Center For Community Health (CCH), the Primary Care Research Center (PCRC), and The Texas Center for Health Disparities (TCHD).

The UNT Center for Human Identification, which is housed at UNTHSC, analyzes DNA samples from both unidentified remains as well as reference samples submitted by family members of missing persons to law enforcement agencies nationwide. It also conducts all DNA analysis for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The Center is the only academic center in the U.S. with access to the FBI’s next-generation CODIS 6.0 DNA Software. UNTHSC also manages the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) for the U.S. Department of Justice.

UNTHSC serves as home to several National Institutes of Health-funded research programs and currently leads all Texas health science centers in research growth. The Health Science Center also houses laboratories for TECH Fort Worth, a non-profit business incubator for biotechnology.

Community and school outreach programs include Fort Worth’s annual Hispanic Wellness Fair and the annual Cowtown Marathon, which were founded by UNTHSC. The UNTHSC Pediatric Mobile Clinic provides high-quality healthcare to children in underserved areas of Fort Worth at no cost. The Health Science Center participates in 10 state and federally funded programs that bring students and teachers onto campus each summer.
Logo University of North Texas Health Science Center

University of North Texas Health Science Center

Fort WorthCultural Studies Medicine, General, Internal Pharmacology, Pharmacy

The University of North Texas Health Science Center, commonly known as the UNT Health Science Center and abbreviated UNTHSC, is a graduate-level institution of the University of North Texas System. The 2,243-student, 33-acre campus opened in 1970 and is located in the Cultural District of Fort Worth, Texas.

The UNT Health Science Center comprises the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM), the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the School of Public Health, the School of Health Professions, the UNT System College of Pharmacy, plus other centers and institutes.

UNT Health at UNTHSC is the TCOM faculty practice program providing direct patient care. UNT Health handles over 600,000 patient visits annually. The group's 230 physicians practice in 40 medical and surgical specialties and subspecialties, including allergy/immunology, family practice, cardiology, neurology, obstetrics & gynecology, oncology, orthopedics, psychiatry, sports medicine and neurosurgery.

Research centers and institutes at UNTSHC include the Cardiovascular Research Institute (CRI), the Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technologies (CCFT), the Focused on Resources for her Health Education and Research (FOR HER), the Institute for Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Research (IAADR), the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR), the Institute of Applied Genetics (IAG), the North Texas Eye Research Institute (NTERI), the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC), the Texas Prevention Institute (TPI), the Center For Community Health (CCH), the Primary Care Research Center (PCRC), and The Texas Center for Health Disparities (TCHD).

The UNT Center for Human Identification, which is housed at UNTHSC, analyzes DNA samples from both unidentified remains as well as reference samples submitted by family members of missing persons to law enforcement agencies nationwide. It also conducts all DNA analysis for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The Center is the only academic center in the U.S. with access to the FBI’s next-generation CODIS 6.0 DNA Software. UNTHSC also manages the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) for the U.S. Department of Justice.

UNTHSC serves as home to several National Institutes of Health-funded research programs and currently leads all Texas health science centers in research growth. The Health Science Center also houses laboratories for TECH Fort Worth, a non-profit business incubator for biotechnology.

Community and school outreach programs include Fort Worth’s annual Hispanic Wellness Fair and the annual Cowtown Marathon, which were founded by UNTHSC. The UNTHSC Pediatric Mobile Clinic provides high-quality healthcare to children in underserved areas of Fort Worth at no cost. The Health Science Center participates in 10 state and federally funded programs that bring students and teachers onto campus each summer.
Logo University of North Texas Health Science Center

University of North Texas Health Science Center

Fort WorthCultural Studies Medicine, General, Internal Pharmacology, Pharmacy

The University of North Texas Health Science Center, commonly known as the UNT Health Science Center and abbreviated UNTHSC, is a graduate-level institution of the University of North Texas System. The 2,243-student, 33-acre campus opened in 1970 and is located in the Cultural District of Fort Worth, Texas.

The UNT Health Science Center comprises the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM), the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the School of Public Health, the School of Health Professions, the UNT System College of Pharmacy, plus other centers and institutes.

UNT Health at UNTHSC is the TCOM faculty practice program providing direct patient care. UNT Health handles over 600,000 patient visits annually. The group's 230 physicians practice in 40 medical and surgical specialties and subspecialties, including allergy/immunology, family practice, cardiology, neurology, obstetrics & gynecology, oncology, orthopedics, psychiatry, sports medicine and neurosurgery.

Research centers and institutes at UNTSHC include the Cardiovascular Research Institute (CRI), the Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technologies (CCFT), the Focused on Resources for her Health Education and Research (FOR HER), the Institute for Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Research (IAADR), the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR), the Institute of Applied Genetics (IAG), the North Texas Eye Research Institute (NTERI), the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC), the Texas Prevention Institute (TPI), the Center For Community Health (CCH), the Primary Care Research Center (PCRC), and The Texas Center for Health Disparities (TCHD).

The UNT Center for Human Identification, which is housed at UNTHSC, analyzes DNA samples from both unidentified remains as well as reference samples submitted by family members of missing persons to law enforcement agencies nationwide. It also conducts all DNA analysis for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The Center is the only academic center in the U.S. with access to the FBI’s next-generation CODIS 6.0 DNA Software. UNTHSC also manages the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) for the U.S. Department of Justice.

UNTHSC serves as home to several National Institutes of Health-funded research programs and currently leads all Texas health science centers in research growth. The Health Science Center also houses laboratories for TECH Fort Worth, a non-profit business incubator for biotechnology.

Community and school outreach programs include Fort Worth’s annual Hispanic Wellness Fair and the annual Cowtown Marathon, which were founded by UNTHSC. The UNTHSC Pediatric Mobile Clinic provides high-quality healthcare to children in underserved areas of Fort Worth at no cost. The Health Science Center participates in 10 state and federally funded programs that bring students and teachers onto campus each summer.
Logo Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

College StationMechanical Engineering Mining, Mineral Processing Mathematics, Statistics, Finance Agriculture, Fisheries, Food Cultural Studies Languages, Philology, Linguistic Studies Literature

Texas A&M University (Texas A&M, TAMU (/ˈtæmuː/), or A&M) is a coeducational public research university located in College Station, Texas, United States. It is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System, the fourth-largest university in the United States and the largest university in Texas. Texas A&M's designation as a land, sea, and space grant institution reflects a range of research with ongoing projects funded by agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. The school ranks in the top 20 American research institutes in funding and has made contributions to such fields as animal cloning and petroleum engineering.

The first public institution of higher education in Texas, the school opened on October 4, 1876 as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas under the provisions of the Morrill Land-Grant Acts. Originally, the college taught no classes in agriculture, instead concentrating on classical studies, languages, literature, and applied mathematics. After four years, students could attain degrees in scientific agriculture, civil and mining engineering, and language and literature. Under the leadership of President James Earl Rudder in the 1960s, A&M desegregated, became coeducational, and dropped the requirement for participation in the Corps of Cadets. To reflect the institution's expanded roles and academic offerings, the Texas Legislature renamed the school to Texas A&M University in 1963. The letters "A&M", originally short for "Agricultural and Mechanical", are retained only as a link to the university's past. The school's students, alumni, and sports teams are known as Aggies.

The main campus is one of the largest in the United States, spanning 5,200 acres (21 km2), and includes the George Bush Presidential Library. About one-fifth of the student body lives on campus. Texas A&M has approximately 1,000 officially recognized student organizations. Many students also observe the traditions of Texas A&M University, which govern daily life, as well as special occasions, including sports events. On July 1, 2012, the school joined the Southeastern Conference. A&M operates two branches: Texas A&M at Qatar and Texas A&M University at Galveston. Working with agencies such as the Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M has a direct presence in each of the 254 counties in Texas. The university offers degrees in over 150 courses of study through ten colleges and houses 18 research institutes. Texas A&M has awarded over 320,000 degrees, including 70,000 graduate and professional degrees.

As a Senior Military College, Texas A&M is one of six American public universities with a full-time, volunteer Corps of Cadets who study alongside civilian undergraduate students.

B. H. Carroll Theological Institute

IrvingAudit, Accounting

B. H. Carroll Theological Institute is an accredited Christian Baptist institution in Irving, Texas with multiple sources of funding and a self-perpetuating board of governors. It is named after Benajah Harvey Carroll and teaches Baptist principles and practices. It operates in cooperation primarily with Baptist churches, and also cooperates with other Great Commission Christians. The institution offers classes in both conventional classroom settings and by innovative means. It trains students in "“teaching churches” located in multiple Texas cities, as well as through interactive lessons taught over the Internet", with 20 such "teaching churches" in operation throughout Texas as of November 2006. The school plans to focus on the use of distance education to make it easier for students to obtain theological education. As of 2006, the school's second year of operation, B. H. Carroll Theological Institute has 300 students taking courses they hope will lead to seminary degrees and an additional 300 students auditing courses. Bruce Corley was Carroll's first president; Gene Wilkes is Carroll's second president.

In January 2007, the Institute was certified to grant degrees by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and was later exempted from such certification through a ruling of the Texas State Supreme Court. In late February 2012, B. H. Carroll Theological Institute received accreditation status from the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE). Carroll is listed among Institutions and Programs accredited by recognized U.S. Accrediting Organizations by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation(CHEA).
Logo The College at Southwestern

The College at Southwestern

Fort WorthHistoryMusic

The College at Southwestern is the fully accredited baccalaureate school at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, United States. The College offers the Bachelor of Arts in Humanities and the Bachelor of Arts in Music. The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities is a 129 credit hour degree program in the classical tradition, focusing on the Bible and the history of ideas. Students can choose between several degree concentrations, including History of Ideas, Education, Homemaking, Music, and Missions. The Bachelor of Arts in Music is a 126/127 credit hours degree program. Students can choose between several concentrations, including worship, performance, and composition.

Stephen Smith (Ph.D., Regent University) became the dean of the College at Southwestern in January, 2010. Smith is the author of Dying to Preach (Kregel, 2009).

Paige Patterson (Ph.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary) is the President of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and of The College at Southwestern. Patterson was elected the eighth president of Southwestern Seminary in 2003.

Student life at Southwestern includes campus-wide chapel three times a week, an on-campus grill and coffee house in the Naylor Student Center, a Recreation Center (featuring a pool, indoor basketball court, aerobic and weight rooms, indoor racquetball courts, intramural sports, and karate and swimming classes), The Riley Conference and Guest Housing Center, student organizations, and mission and evangelism trips. Southwestern has an on-campus medical clinic.
Logo Texas Christian University

Texas Christian University

Fort Worth

Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private, coeducational university located in Fort Worth, Texas. The campus is located on 272 acres (1.10 km2) about three miles (8 km) from downtown Fort Worth. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Disciples of Christ. Its mascot is the "horned frog". For most varsity sports TCU competes in the Big 12 conference of the NCAA's Division I. The university enrolls around 9,725 students, with 8,456 being undergraduates. As of October 2011, TCU's total endowment was $1.2 billion.
Logo College of Education, Texas Christian University

College of Education, Texas Christian University

Fort WorthEducation, Educational Research

Logo Texas Christian University

Texas Christian University

Fort Worth

Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private, coeducational university located in Fort Worth, Texas. The campus is located on 272 acres (1.10 km2) about three miles (8 km) from downtown Fort Worth. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Disciples of Christ. Its mascot is the "horned frog". For most varsity sports TCU competes in the Big 12 conference of the NCAA's Division I. The university enrolls around 9,725 students, with 8,456 being undergraduates. As of October 2011, TCU's total endowment was $1.2 billion.
Logo Texas Christian University

Texas Christian University

Fort Worth

Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private, coeducational university located in Fort Worth, Texas. The campus is located on 272 acres (1.10 km2) about three miles (8 km) from downtown Fort Worth. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Disciples of Christ. Its mascot is the "horned frog". For most varsity sports TCU competes in the Big 12 conference of the NCAA's Division I. The university enrolls around 9,725 students, with 8,456 being undergraduates. As of October 2011, TCU's total endowment was $1.2 billion.
Logo Texas Christian University

Texas Christian University

Fort Worth

Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private, coeducational university located in Fort Worth, Texas. The campus is located on 272 acres (1.10 km2) about three miles (8 km) from downtown Fort Worth. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Disciples of Christ. Its mascot is the "horned frog". For most varsity sports TCU competes in the Big 12 conference of the NCAA's Division I. The university enrolls around 9,725 students, with 8,456 being undergraduates. As of October 2011, TCU's total endowment was $1.2 billion.
Logo Texas Tech University

Texas Tech University

LubbockLaw Energy, Fuels Meteorology, Atmospheric Sciences

Texas Tech University, often referred to as Texas Tech, Tech, or TTU, is a public research university in Lubbock, Texas, United States. Established on February 10, 1923, and originally known as Texas Technological College, it is the leading institution of the four-institution Texas Tech University System. The university's student enrollment is the sixth-largest in the state of Texas, as of the Fall 2014 semester. The university shares its campus with Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, making it the only campus in Texas to house an undergraduate university, law school, and medical school at the same location.

The university offers degrees in more than 150 courses of study through 13 colleges and hosts 60 research centers and institutes. Texas Tech University has awarded over 200,000 degrees since 1927, including over 40,000 graduate and professional degrees. The Carnegie Foundation classifies Texas Tech as having "high research activity". Research projects in the areas of epidemiology, pulsed power, grid computing, nanophotonics, atmospheric sciences, and wind energy are among the most prominent at the university. The Spanish Renaissance-themed campus, described by author James Michener as "the most beautiful west of the Mississippi until you get to Stanford", has been awarded the Grand Award for excellence in grounds-keeping, and has been noted for possessing a public art collection among the ten best in the United States.

The Texas Tech Red Raiders are charter members of the Big 12 Conference and compete in Division I for all varsity sports. The Red Raiders football team has made 36 bowl appearances, which is 17th most of any university. The Red Raiders basketball team has made 14 appearances in the NCAA Division I Tournament. Bob Knight, the second-winningest coach in men's NCAA Division I basketball history, served as the team's head coach from 2001 to 2008. The Lady Raiders basketball team won the 1993 NCAA Division I Tournament. In 1999, Texas Tech's Goin' Band from Raiderland received the Sudler Trophy, which is awarded to "recognize collegiate marching bands of particular excellence".

Though the majority of the university's students originate in the southwestern United States, the school has served students from all 50 states and more than 100 countries. Texas Tech University alumni and former students have gone on to prominent careers in government, business, science, medicine, education, sports, and entertainment.

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