Your search contains more than 50 results. Only the first results are displayed. Refine your search to get more precise results. New Search

Logo University of Chicago

University of Chicago

ChicagoBusinessLawMedicine, General, InternalNuclear IndustryPhysicsEconomicsPolitical ScienceSociologyTheology, Religion

The University of Chicago (U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. Established in 1890, the University of Chicago consists of The College, various graduate programs, interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, and the Divinity School. The university currently enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and around 15,000 students overall.

University of Chicago scholars have played a major role in the development of various academic disciplines, including: the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, and the behavioralism school of political science. Chicago's physics department helped develop the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction beneath the university's Stagg Field. Chicago's research pursuits have been aided by unique affiliations with world-renowned institutions like the nearby Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory, as well as the Marine Biological Laboratory. The university is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States.

Founded by the American Baptist Education Society with a donation from oil magnate and wealthiest man in history John D. Rockefeller, the University of Chicago was incorporated in 1890; William Rainey Harper became the university's first president in 1891, and the first classes were held in 1892. Both Harper and future president Robert Maynard Hutchins advocated for Chicago's curriculum to be based upon theoretical and perennial issues rather than on applied sciences and commercial utility. With Harper's vision in mind, the University of Chicago also became one of the 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities, an international organization of leading research universities, in 1900.

The University of Chicago is home to many prominent alumni. 89 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the university as visiting professors, students, faculty, or staff, the fourth most of any institution in the world. In addition, Chicago's alumni include 49 Rhodes Scholars, 9 Fields Medalists, 13 National Humanities Medalists, 13 billionaire graduates, and a plethora of members of the United States Congress and heads of state of countries all over the world.
Logo University of Chicago

University of Chicago

ChicagoBusiness Law Medicine, General, Internal Nuclear Industry Physics Economics Political Science Sociology Theology, Religion

The University of Chicago (U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. Established in 1890, the University of Chicago consists of The College, various graduate programs, interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, and the Divinity School. The university currently enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and around 15,000 students overall.

University of Chicago scholars have played a major role in the development of various academic disciplines, including: the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, and the behavioralism school of political science. Chicago's physics department helped develop the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction beneath the university's Stagg Field. Chicago's research pursuits have been aided by unique affiliations with world-renowned institutions like the nearby Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory, as well as the Marine Biological Laboratory. The university is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States.

Founded by the American Baptist Education Society with a donation from oil magnate and wealthiest man in history John D. Rockefeller, the University of Chicago was incorporated in 1890; William Rainey Harper became the university's first president in 1891, and the first classes were held in 1892. Both Harper and future president Robert Maynard Hutchins advocated for Chicago's curriculum to be based upon theoretical and perennial issues rather than on applied sciences and commercial utility. With Harper's vision in mind, the University of Chicago also became one of the 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities, an international organization of leading research universities, in 1900.

The University of Chicago is home to many prominent alumni. 89 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the university as visiting professors, students, faculty, or staff, the fourth most of any institution in the world. In addition, Chicago's alumni include 49 Rhodes Scholars, 9 Fields Medalists, 13 National Humanities Medalists, 13 billionaire graduates, and a plethora of members of the United States Congress and heads of state of countries all over the world.
Logo Robert Morris University Illinois

Robert Morris University Illinois

ChicagoBusinessManagementNursing

Robert Morris University Illinois, formerly Robert Morris College, is an educational institution in the U.S. state of Illinois that has multiple sites, including locations in Chicago (main campus), DuPage, Bensenville, Elgin, Arlington Heights, Orland Park, Peoria, Schaumburg, Springfield, and Lake County. Robert Morris University-Illinois was formerly known as Robert Morris College; however, the institution changed its name to Robert Morris University-Illinois on May 1, 2009. It is a private, accredited, not-for-profit institution with 501(c)(3) status. It offers associate and bachelor's degrees through the School of Business Administration, Institute of Art and Design, Institute of Technology & Media, Institute of Culinary Arts, and the College of Nursing & Health Studies. In 2006, the Morris Graduate School of Management was established, providing Master of Business Administration and Master of Information Systems programs at the Chicago, DuPage and Orland Park campuses. The graduate program has now expanded to all locations across Illinois. Robert Morris University is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Like its namesake in Pennsylvania, Robert Morris University is named after Robert Morris, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and financier of the American Revolution. However, the universities are not affiliated with each other.
Logo University of Chicago

University of Chicago

ChicagoBusiness Law Medicine, General, Internal Nuclear Industry Physics Economics Political Science Sociology Theology, Religion

The University of Chicago (U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. Established in 1890, the University of Chicago consists of The College, various graduate programs, interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, and the Divinity School. The university currently enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and around 15,000 students overall.

University of Chicago scholars have played a major role in the development of various academic disciplines, including: the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, and the behavioralism school of political science. Chicago's physics department helped develop the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction beneath the university's Stagg Field. Chicago's research pursuits have been aided by unique affiliations with world-renowned institutions like the nearby Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory, as well as the Marine Biological Laboratory. The university is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States.

Founded by the American Baptist Education Society with a donation from oil magnate and wealthiest man in history John D. Rockefeller, the University of Chicago was incorporated in 1890; William Rainey Harper became the university's first president in 1891, and the first classes were held in 1892. Both Harper and future president Robert Maynard Hutchins advocated for Chicago's curriculum to be based upon theoretical and perennial issues rather than on applied sciences and commercial utility. With Harper's vision in mind, the University of Chicago also became one of the 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities, an international organization of leading research universities, in 1900.

The University of Chicago is home to many prominent alumni. 89 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the university as visiting professors, students, faculty, or staff, the fourth most of any institution in the world. In addition, Chicago's alumni include 49 Rhodes Scholars, 9 Fields Medalists, 13 National Humanities Medalists, 13 billionaire graduates, and a plethora of members of the United States Congress and heads of state of countries all over the world.
Logo Shimer College

Shimer College

Chicago

Shimer College (pronounced Listeni/ˈʃaɪmər/ SHY-mər) is an American Great Books college in Chicago, Illinois. Founded in 1853 as the Mt. Carroll Seminary in Mount Carroll, Illinois, the school became affiliated with the University of Chicago and was renamed the Frances Shimer Academy in 1896. It was renamed Shimer College in 1950, when it began offering a four-year curriculum based on the Hutchins Plan of the University of Chicago. Although the University of Chicago parted with Shimer (and the Hutchins' Plan) in 1958, Shimer has continued to use a version of that curriculum. The college left Mount Carroll for Waukegan in 1978, moving to Chicago in 2006.

Its academic program is based on a core curriculum of sixteen required courses in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. All courses are small seminars with no more than twelve students, and are based on original sources from a list of about 200 core texts broadly based on the Great Books canon. Classroom instruction is Socratic discussion. Considerable writing is required, including two comprehensive examinations and a senior thesis. Students are admitted primarily on the basis of essays and interviews; no minimum grades or test scores are required. Shimer has one of the highest alumni doctorate rates in the country.

The college occupies a complex designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe on the main campus of the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago's Near South Side. The American Institute of Architects has called the IIT campus one of the 200 most significant works of architecture in the United States, and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.

Shimer is governed internally by an assembly in which all community members have a vote.

According to The New York Times, students "share a love of books [and] a disdain for the conventional style of education. Many say they did not have a good high school experience". Students, who tend to be individualistic and creative thinkers, are encouraged to ask questions. Shimer has historically averaged 125 students, and enrolled 97 in 2014. Most Shimer alumni go on to graduate studies.
Logo Adler School of Professional Psychology

Adler School of Professional Psychology

ChicagoPsychologyCriminology, PenologyEthnic, Family StudiesManagementRehabilitation

Adler University is a post-baccalaureate, non-profit institution of higher education and private graduate school of social and health sciences located in Chicago, Illinois and Vancouver, British Columbia. Adler University continues the pioneering work of psychiatrist and first community psychologist Alfred Adler by graduating socially responsible practitioners, engaging communities, and advancing social justice. Formerly named The Adler School of Professional Psychology, in November 2013 the institution's Board of Trustees voted unanimously to advance the institution's collegiate status to that of a university. The name change -- to Adler University -- occurred officially in January 2015 to reflect both the growth of the institution and its broadening pedagogical focus beyond psychology.

Adler University offers three doctoral degrees, one in clinical psychology (Psy.D.), a Doctor of Couple and Family Therapy (D.C.F.T.), and a Ph.D. in Counselor Education & Supervision -- and more than a dozen master’s degree programs in areas such as counseling psychology, art therapy, public policy, nonprofit management, emergency management leadership, criminology, and rehabilitation. Adler enrolls more than 1,200 students at both its campuses in Chicago, Illinois and Vancouver, British Columbia. The current president of Adler University is Raymond E. Crossman, Ph.D. Crossman is the fifth president of university, appointed in 2003, and since then has realized a new vision, new academic programs, and significant growth for the institution.

In striving to be the leader in educating socially responsible practitioners, Adler University attracts applicants to its graduate programs who are broadly interested in social justice -- and its interface with social science, public policy, and the health sciences, rather than applicants who are merely interested in traditional private practice.

Adler Toronto and the Adler Graduate School in Minneapolis, Minnesota are not affiliated administratively with Adler University in Chicago, Illinois and Vancouver, British Columbia.
Logo Chicago Theological Seminary

Chicago Theological Seminary

ChicagoTheology, Religion

The Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) is an ecumenical American seminary located in Chicago, Illinois, and is one of seven seminaries historically affiliated with the United Church of Christ. It is the oldest institution of higher education in Chicago, originally established in 1855 under the direction of abolitionist the Rev. Stephen Peet and the Congregational Church (now the United Church of Christ) by charter of the Illinois legislature. In addition to being a seminary of the United Church of Christ, CTS offers students coursework necessary to be ordained by both the United Methodist Church and the Metropolitan Community Church denominations.

In the 19th century, the Chicago Theological Seminary lead the Christian Abolitionism movement, while during the 20th century, the seminary stood as a bastion of Social Gospel Christianity. The seminary's preeminent religious activists and theologians among its faculty and alumni include Graham Taylor, Howard Schomer, G. Campbell Morgan, and Otis Moss III.

Chicago Theological enrolls a diverse student population representing more than 40 different faith traditions, perspectives and denominations, and houses the Center for the Study of Black Faith and Life (CSBFL), the Center for Jewish, Christian, & Islamic Studies (JCIS), the Center for the Study of Korean Christianity (CSKC), and the LGBTQ Religious Studies Center. CTS students hold academic reciprocity with the University of Chicago, the University of Chicago Divinity School, and with member schools of the Association of Chicago Theological Schools consortium.

The first in many fields, CTS remains the first theological school to introduce the field education experience into a seminary curriculum, the first to create a distinct Department of Christian Sociology in an American theological school, the first seminary to award a degree in divinity to a woman in the US (Florence Fensham, 1902), the first seminary in the US to award the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree for his activism in the Civil Rights movement, the first to elect an African American to lead a predominantly white theological school (C. Shelby Rooks, 1974 to 1984), and the first free-standing Protestant seminary to endow a chair in Jewish Studies.

A university is missing?

Add it

Creative Commons License Except otherwise noted, the work presented on this page is licensed under a Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0). Note: Exception includes: flags, Alumnya logo, ranking system.