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Logo Boston University

Boston University

BostonBusinessLawUrban Studies

Boston University (most commonly referred to as BU or otherwise known as Boston U.) is a private research university located in Boston, Massachusetts. The university is nonsectarian, but is historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church.

The university has more than 3,800 faculty members and 33,000 students, and is one of Boston's largest employers. It offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctorates, and medical, dental, business, and law degrees through eighteen schools and colleges on two urban campuses. The main campus is situated along the Charles River in Boston's Fenway-Kenmore and Allston neighborhoods, while the Boston University Medical Campus is in Boston's South End neighborhood.

BU is categorized as an RU/VH Research University (very high research activity) in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.BU is a member of the Boston Consortium for Higher Education and the Association of American Universities.

The university counts seven Nobel Laureates when including Nobel Peace Prize winners Martin Luther King, Jr. (PhD '55) and Elie Wiesel, 35 Pulitzer Prize winners, nine Academy Award winners, Emmy and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. BU also has MacArthur, Sloan, and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as American Academy of Arts and Sciences and National Academy of Sciences members among its past and present graduates and faculty.

The Boston University Terriers compete in the NCAA's Division I. BU athletic teams compete in the Patriot League, and Hockey East conferences, and their mascot is Rhett the Boston Terrier. Boston University is well known for men's hockey, in which it has won five national championships, most recently in 2009.
Logo Harvard University

Harvard University

CambridgeHistoryCultural Studies

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, established in 1636. Its history, influence and wealth have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Established originally by the Massachusetts legislature and soon thereafter named for John Harvard (its first benefactor), Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregation­alist and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard has the largest financial endowment of any academic institution in the world, standing at $32.3 billion as of June 2013.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the University's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. It operates several arts, cultural, and scientific museums, alongside the Harvard Library, which is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries with over 18 million volumes. Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, several foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, and 335 Rhodes Scholars. To date, some 150 Nobel laureates and 5 Fields Medalists (when awarded) have been affiliated as students, faculty, or staff.
Logo North Shore Community College

North Shore Community College

DanversBusinessCultural StudiesEthnic, Family StudiesUrban Studies

North Shore Community College is a comprehensive community college offering over 80 associate degree and certificate programs to approximately 16,000 students a year from the 26 cities and towns along the coastal region from north metropolitan Boston to Cape Ann. The college has campuses in Danvers, Lynn, Beverly and Middleton Massachusetts. The college offers transfer programs as well as lifelong learning opportunities and workforce development training to businesses and individuals, cultural enrichment activities, and community development resources. North Shore Community College prepares students for the challenges of living and working in a global economy and provides a competent workforce for the north of Boston region. The College offers a 21st-century curriculum that balances liberal arts with career education delivered through a variety of instructional methods. Approximately 250,000 people have taken courses at the college’s three campuses in Lynn, Danvers and Beverly, as well as online. NSCC recently added a fourth campus in Middleton.

North Shore Community College is one of the largest of the 15 community colleges in Massachusetts and is a source of hope and opportunity and a regional leader for social and economic change. Blending tradition and innovation, liberal arts and career preparation, intellectual development and cultural and personal growth, NSCC fosters a diverse and caring community of learners where all are welcome and each is challenged. NSCC’s student body represents a mix of urban and suburban, a diversity of ethnic and racial groups, white- and blue-collar, middle- and low-income groups, as well as growing numbers of recent immigrants.

Fully accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, North Shore offers lifelong education responsive to changing community needs, evolving technology and the shifting roles faced by individuals and institutions. We believe our greatest contribution to the Commonwealth is the success and achievement of our students. Eighty four percent of our career and technical program students are employed within three months of graduation, and 92% of our graduates live and work on the North Shore. Giving our students the tools to prepare them for the real world and the opportunity to create a future for themselves, their families, and their communities - this is the essence of North Shore Community College.

The college is celebrating its 50th anniversary September 2014 – September 2015 with the theme of Our Legacy, Your Future.
Logo Boston College

Boston College

NewtonArchitectureHistory

Boston College (BC) is a private Jesuit Catholic research university located in the village of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States, 6 miles (9.7 km) west of downtown Boston. It has 9,100 full-time undergraduates and almost 5,000 graduate students. The university's name reflects its early history as a liberal arts college and preparatory school (now Boston College High School) in Boston's South End. It is a member of the 568 Group and the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Its main campus is a historic district and features some of the earliest examples of collegiate gothic architecture in North America.

Boston College's undergraduate program is currently ranked 30th in the National Universities ranking by U.S. News & World Report. Boston College is categorized as a research university with high research activity by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Students at the university earned 21 Fulbright Awards in 2012, ranking the school eighth among American research institutions. At $2.2 billion, Boston College has the 40th largest university endowment in North America.

Boston College offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees through its nine schools and colleges: Morrissey College of Arts & Sciences, Boston College Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Carroll School of Management, Lynch School of Education, Connell School of Nursing, Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, Boston College Law School, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, Woods College of Advancing Studies.

Boston College sports teams are called the Eagles, and their colors are maroon and gold; the school mascot is Baldwin the Eagle. The Eagles compete in NCAA Division I as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference in all sports offered by the ACC. The men's and women's ice hockey teams compete in Hockey East. Boston College's men's ice hockey team is one of the most decorated programs in the nation, having won five national championships.
Logo Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

CambridgeBank, InsuranceDancePhysicsEconomicsManagementBiology, Biochemistry, BiotechnologyLanguages, Philology, Linguistic Studies

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. Researchers worked on computers, radar, and inertial guidance during World War II and the Cold War. Post-war defense research contributed to the rapid expansion of the faculty and campus under James Killian. The current 168-acre (68.0 ha) campus opened in 1916 and extends over 1 mile (1.6 km) along the northern bank of the Charles River basin.

MIT, with five schools and one college which contain a total of 32 departments, is traditionally known for its research and education in the physical sciences and engineering, and more recently in biology, economics, linguistics, and management as well. MIT is often cited as among the world's top universities. The "Engineers" sponsor 31 sports, most teams of which compete in the NCAA Division III's New England Women's and Men's Athletic Conference; the Division I rowing programs compete as part of the EARC and EAWRC.

As of 2015, 84 Nobel laureates, 52 National Medal of Science recipients, 45 Rhodes Scholars, 38 MacArthur Fellows, 34 astronauts, and 2 Fields Medalists have been affiliated with MIT. The school has a strong entrepreneurial culture, and the aggregated revenues of companies founded by MIT alumni would rank as the eleventh-largest economy in the world.
Logo Babson College

Babson College

WellesleyBusinessAudit, AccountingManagement

Babson College is a private business school in Wellesley, Massachusetts, established in 1919. Its central focus on entrepreneurship education has made it the top entrepreneurship college in the United States.

Babson offers bachelor's degrees in business administration, and students have the opportunity to declare concentrations in more than twenty-five areas of study. The College also offers master's degrees in business administration, accounting, entrepreneurial leadership, and management. Often referred to as the "Entrepreneur's College," Babson is known for immersing its students in the entrepreneurial lifestyle and culture. Babson currently offers nearly fifty-five entrepreneurship-related undergraduate courses. These courses are taught in tandem with traditional liberal arts courses, which are over sixty percent of the typical student's schedule. Every entrepreneurship course at Babson is taught by professors who have started, sold, bought, or run successful businesses. Babson currently has an undergraduate acceptance rate of 26%.

Babson College has consistently appeared on the U.S. News & World Report rankings as the number one college in entrepreneurship education for nearly three decades. In 2014, CNN's Money Magazine named Babson the number one college in the country, and in 2015, the magazine ranked it second. Babson's MBA program has also been ranked number one in entrepreneurship for over twenty years by U.S. News & World Report. Babson's alumni include five living billionaires.
Logo Harvard University

Harvard University

CambridgeHistory Cultural Studies

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, established in 1636. Its history, influence and wealth have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Established originally by the Massachusetts legislature and soon thereafter named for John Harvard (its first benefactor), Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregation­alist and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard has the largest financial endowment of any academic institution in the world, standing at $32.3 billion as of June 2013.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the University's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. It operates several arts, cultural, and scientific museums, alongside the Harvard Library, which is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries with over 18 million volumes. Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, several foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, and 335 Rhodes Scholars. To date, some 150 Nobel laureates and 5 Fields Medalists (when awarded) have been affiliated as students, faculty, or staff.
Logo Harvard University

Harvard University

CambridgeHistory Cultural Studies

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, established in 1636. Its history, influence and wealth have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Established originally by the Massachusetts legislature and soon thereafter named for John Harvard (its first benefactor), Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregation­alist and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard has the largest financial endowment of any academic institution in the world, standing at $32.3 billion as of June 2013.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the University's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. It operates several arts, cultural, and scientific museums, alongside the Harvard Library, which is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries with over 18 million volumes. Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, several foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, and 335 Rhodes Scholars. To date, some 150 Nobel laureates and 5 Fields Medalists (when awarded) have been affiliated as students, faculty, or staff.
Logo Boston University

Boston University

BostonBusiness Law Urban Studies

Boston University (most commonly referred to as BU or otherwise known as Boston U.) is a private research university located in Boston, Massachusetts. The university is nonsectarian, but is historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church.

The university has more than 3,800 faculty members and 33,000 students, and is one of Boston's largest employers. It offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctorates, and medical, dental, business, and law degrees through eighteen schools and colleges on two urban campuses. The main campus is situated along the Charles River in Boston's Fenway-Kenmore and Allston neighborhoods, while the Boston University Medical Campus is in Boston's South End neighborhood.

BU is categorized as an RU/VH Research University (very high research activity) in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.BU is a member of the Boston Consortium for Higher Education and the Association of American Universities.

The university counts seven Nobel Laureates when including Nobel Peace Prize winners Martin Luther King, Jr. (PhD '55) and Elie Wiesel, 35 Pulitzer Prize winners, nine Academy Award winners, Emmy and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. BU also has MacArthur, Sloan, and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as American Academy of Arts and Sciences and National Academy of Sciences members among its past and present graduates and faculty.

The Boston University Terriers compete in the NCAA's Division I. BU athletic teams compete in the Patriot League, and Hockey East conferences, and their mascot is Rhett the Boston Terrier. Boston University is well known for men's hockey, in which it has won five national championships, most recently in 2009.
Logo Suffolk University Law School

Suffolk University Law School

BostonLawPolitical Science

Suffolk University Law School (also known as "Suffolk Law School"). Suffolk University Law School is a private, non-sectarian law school located in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. Suffolk University Law School was founded in 1906 by Gleason Archer, Sr. to provide a legal education for those who traditionally lacked the opportunity to study law because of socio-economic or racial discrimination. Suffolk is the fourth-oldest New England law school in continuous existence.

The law school currently has both day and evening, part-time divisions. Suffolk University Law School has been accredited by the American Bar Association since 1953 and the Association of American Law Schools since 1977. The school is located in Sargent Hall on Tremont Street in downtown Boston. Suffolk offers over 200 upper-level electives, the most of any law school in the country, and is consistently ranked one of the most technologically advanced schools in the nation. Suffolk publishes six law reviews, to which students, faculty, and other scholars contribute. Suffolk has attracted notable scholars and prominent speakers including, but not limited to, John F. Kennedy, William Rehnquist, Antonin Scalia, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Noam Chomsky. Suffolk University Law School alumni are found in high-level judicial, political, and private positions throughout the United States. With over 25,000 alumni, Suffolk is the fourth largest law school in the United States.

According to Suffolk Law's 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 36.9% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.
Logo Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Boston

The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (formerly Harvard School of Public Health, as HSPH; now also referred to the Harvard Chan School, The T.H. Chan School, The T.H. Chan School of Public Health, or still simply The Chan School of Public Health) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University, located in the Longwood Medical Area of Boston, Massachusetts neighborhood of Mission Hill, which is next to Harvard Medical School. HSPH is considered a significant school focusing on health in the United States. The school grew out of the Harvard-MIT School for Health Officers, the nation's first graduate training program in population health, which was founded in 1913 and became Harvard School of Public Health in 1922. Julio Frenk, the Minister of Health of Mexico from 2000 to 2006 and a former executive director of the World Health Organization (WHO), became the new dean of the school in January 2009.

Harvard School of Public Health is one of the most selective and prestigious public health schools in the world. In 2006, the middle 50 percent of the incoming class had an incoming GPA between 3.50 and 3.75 (out of 4.0). About half of students already hold a medical doctorate (M.D. or D.O.), and many of the others already hold another advanced professional or doctoral degree upon admission (typically a DPM, DDS/DMD, PhD, JD, or MBA). Students at the school are drawn from around the world, with about 40 percent of the student body coming from outside of the United States.

As of 2015, the school is ranked second in the nation (after the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and tied with University of North Carolina School of Public Health) in the U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News consistently ranks Harvard #1 in Health Policy and Management.

The School's objectives are to provide the highest level of education to health scientists, practitioners, and leaders, to foster new discoveries leading to improved health for the people of this country and all nations, and to strengthen health capacities and services for communities.
Logo Harvard University

Harvard University

CambridgeHistory Cultural Studies

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, established in 1636. Its history, influence and wealth have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Established originally by the Massachusetts legislature and soon thereafter named for John Harvard (its first benefactor), Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregation­alist and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard has the largest financial endowment of any academic institution in the world, standing at $32.3 billion as of June 2013.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the University's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. It operates several arts, cultural, and scientific museums, alongside the Harvard Library, which is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries with over 18 million volumes. Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, several foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, and 335 Rhodes Scholars. To date, some 150 Nobel laureates and 5 Fields Medalists (when awarded) have been affiliated as students, faculty, or staff.
Logo Boston University

Boston University

BostonBusiness Law Urban Studies

Boston University (most commonly referred to as BU or otherwise known as Boston U.) is a private research university located in Boston, Massachusetts. The university is nonsectarian, but is historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church.

The university has more than 3,800 faculty members and 33,000 students, and is one of Boston's largest employers. It offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctorates, and medical, dental, business, and law degrees through eighteen schools and colleges on two urban campuses. The main campus is situated along the Charles River in Boston's Fenway-Kenmore and Allston neighborhoods, while the Boston University Medical Campus is in Boston's South End neighborhood.

BU is categorized as an RU/VH Research University (very high research activity) in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.BU is a member of the Boston Consortium for Higher Education and the Association of American Universities.

The university counts seven Nobel Laureates when including Nobel Peace Prize winners Martin Luther King, Jr. (PhD '55) and Elie Wiesel, 35 Pulitzer Prize winners, nine Academy Award winners, Emmy and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. BU also has MacArthur, Sloan, and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as American Academy of Arts and Sciences and National Academy of Sciences members among its past and present graduates and faculty.

The Boston University Terriers compete in the NCAA's Division I. BU athletic teams compete in the Patriot League, and Hockey East conferences, and their mascot is Rhett the Boston Terrier. Boston University is well known for men's hockey, in which it has won five national championships, most recently in 2009.

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